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Another Awesome Video Of The Day: David Shrigley

 

Pringle of Scotland has commissioned Glasgow-based artist David Shrigley to produce a corporate film. The 3-minute animation depicts the making of jumpers and cardigans over the past nearly 200 year history of the Scottish brand.

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Photographer Spotlight: Gabriel Wickbold

Gabriel Wickbold photography

I’m a fan of color, especially in the  works of  photographer Gabriel Wickbold. Check out the rest of her site as it does not disappoint!

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Brand Creativity: Getting The Most Out Of Your Business Cards

got print business cards got print business cardsBusiness cards have massive potential to keep your audience engaged. When used properly, they act as avenues that drive people to your social media presence, personalize your company and dramatically extend your brand’s footprint.

Of course, creating a great design is critical, but so is putting in the effort afterwards. Fortunately, we’ve come up with a few tried and tested methods for getting more from your legwork.

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Brandon Hirzel/Bemo

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Virginia Mori’s Dark, Surreal Illustrations Of Headless Women

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Italian illustrator Virginia Mori uses black ballpoint pen and pencil on paper to create strange, lady-centric compositions. The minimal drawings feature long-haired women in surreal situations. Heads are often seen severed or parts of the body are fused with furniture. Although they are weird, Mori’s work isn’t gruesome. Even when a umbrella handle is coming out of a character’s mouth, there’s no blood or guts. It’s simply a surreal scene.

Mori separates mind from body, in both literal and figurative ways. Heads are rolling, they exist on different levels, and are obstructed by hair. It represents the idea that we can “disconnect” our mental from our physical self, and that this separation can feel like two entities. But in Mori’s illustrations, what causes it? Mystics? Physical ailments? Lessons not learned? The sparse compositions allow for multiple interpretations.

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Lila Jang’s Warped And Bloated 18th-Century Furniture

Lila Jang - sculpture Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture
Lila Jang - sculpture

South Korean artist Lila Jang is a sculptor who creates distorted effigies of traditional 18th-century French furniture. From bloated footstools to levitating wall lamps, Jang’s anthropomorphic furniture subverts upper-class affectations into warped Lewis Carroll-inspired imagery, evoking wonder and bewilderment in equal measure at the surreal shapes her furniture take on. Jang received her BFA in Sculpture from Honik University in her hometown of Seoul before moving to Paris to attend École Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts for her MFA, and has since gained international acclaim through group shows and art fairs around the globe. According to Jang, her work is a representation of the current state of humanity, stuck “in the midpoint of that constant struggle between reality and the ideal.”

Jang drew inspiration for the series of fantasy furniture from the limitations she found within her cramped apartment in Paris, where tables and chairs only seemed to fit if they were bent out of shape first. The surreality behind the work is also inspired by Jang’s desire to break away from a quotidian routine, turning familiar, unremarkable furnishings into exceptional works of art. Although the pieces are gestural and whimsical in design, the true achievement of the work lies in its retention of the practical applications of the furniture. Even with the canapé climbing the wall, don’t you still want to curl up in it with a book? It’s all the same with Jang’s less functional pieces, such as the warped dining chairs: one can easily picture her pieces fitting right in at any number of houses built by contemporary architects. Jang’s most recent solo exhibition took place at the Centre Culturel de Coreen in Paris where she now lives, presumably in a larger apartment filled with her collection of fantastically anthropomorphic fittings.

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Paola de Grenet’s “Albino Beauty”

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I came across photographer Paola de Grenet’s photo series, “Albino Beauty,” today. Her figures are ethereally beautiful, almost sculptural.

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Laura Plageman’s Subtly Distorted Landscape Photographs Will Make You Do A Double Take

crumpled Photography

distorted  PhotographyLaura Plageman - PhotographyLaura Plageman - Photography

Photographer Laura Plageman carefully distorts her photographs in a way that is so subtle that it makes you do a double take. Using photographs that she has shot, she folds, tears, and crumples idyllic-looking landscapes. This is done in such a way that at first glance, these Plageman’s slight alterations make perfect sense. You wouldn’t necessarily question the melting tree line until you begin to study the photographs.  Once you do, you can see that the mood of these images has changed. And, that’s exactly what Plageman wants. From her artist statement:

Her images explore the relationships between the process of image making, photographic truth and distortion, and the representation of landscape. She is interested in making pictures that examine the natural world as a scene of mystery, beauty, and constant change transformed by both human presence and by its own design.

Plageman titles of all her pieces as “Response to…” I see the the way she manipulates her photographs as a way of responding to the environment that she’s captured.   These aren’t negative interpretations or an ill-will towards these landscapes. Instead, they add another layer of story-telling to what already exists. The creased paper adds depth, and tearing adds a new horizon line. What exists beyond what we now can’t see. Rather than showing us a landscape we’ve seen many times before, Plageman creates a totally new narrative by just a few considered folds.

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