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Yusuke Oono’s 360° Handcut Pop-Up Books

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Japanese artist/designer/architect (and construction worker?Yusuke Oono was thinking beyond flat when she conceived her 3-Dimensional art books. First designing the layouts of each book (which includes titles like Sweet HomeJungle BookIn A Cheese, and a 360° Christmas Book) by hand and with the aid of design programs, Oono then uses a laser-cutter to carve out the highly-detailed dioramas that make up each page of the story. These pages are then bound together, creating a compiled book which more than pops out, but can be read in 360°.

Fitting for an intricate project, these ultra-creative art books are available for purchase, and even more interesting after viewing the dozens of process shots Oono posts documenting her process in intricate detail. (via colossal)

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PAUL BUCKLEY

Paul Buckley, the VP Executive Creative Director for Penguin USA, has continued to art director and design some of the most eye-catching book covers I’ve ever seen. Instead of relying on a simplified photograph with super-clean typography, or reaching back for a retro look, Buckley hires the best-of-the-best in illustration and independent comics (Burns, Hanuka, Millionaire, to name a few) to create wonderfully fresh graphic images that leave little to be desired. And since these books are all classics, you don’t have to worry about being deceived by these alluring covers, because the interiors are guaranteed to be just as perfect as the exteriors. It is encouraging that the daunting sterility of the Kindle and Nook are being combated by men like Buckley, Kidd, Gall, and so many more, and if such devotion remains to be ceaselessly put into future book production, there should be little fear of physical books disappearing anytime soon. For a complete look at all of the book layouts (fronts, backs, interiors) see Sir Buckley’s Flickr.

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Idan Friedman’s Ordinary People & Disposable Objects

Idan Friedman creates portraits of everyday people embossed by hand on disposable tin trays. However this series reminds me of stories you hear about someone seeing the popes image on a moldy slice of bread.

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Designer Fashion Transformed Into Grotesque Consumerism Critique

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The artwork Andrea Hasler if nothing else is a critique of consumerism. Her Burdens of Excess series resemble the strange blend of designer fashion and a slaughterhouse.  Fleshy blobs bulge between straps and buttons nearly turning the high fashion accessories into bizarre creatures.  Zippers and stitching even begin to seem like biological features. Still, our “natural” biological sides as human is a jarring contrast to ideas as contrived as fashion, luxury, even money.

The press release from her recent show at Gusford Gallery in Los Angeles states:

“Hasler’s work focuses on constructions of identity and collective desires, and is characterized by a tension between attraction and repulsion. The works in the Desire series, in particular, focus on the obsession of projections of affluence and glamor. Reworking designer bags, shoes, and accessories into organ-resemblant sculptures, Hasler’s works engage with the psychological aspects of consumerism, blurring the lines between what you are and what you must have.

Through the transformation of GUSFORD’s Melrose Avenue gallery space into an indulgent, glamorous shop, Hasler’s installation embodies the epitome of luxurious excess, and looks to a dystopic future, where branded organs may one day be the ultimate fashion accessory.”

Watch a video of her installation at Gusford Gallery as well as a short interview with the artist after the jump.

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SPORTS! at Synchronicity Gallery

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SPORTS! is a group show curated by Ryan Travis Christian (I believe he is an interviewer on Fecal Face) opening TONIGHT (7pm – 12am) at Synchronicity Gallery in the Melrose/Heliotrope area. Anyone in the area should go because judging by the work that’s going to be featured in the show, and the after gallery hours night-time musical entertainment that the gallery are putting on, it seems like it’s going to be a great show + vibe. I wish I could go but I’m leave for the desert in 10 minutes! A list of the artists, details, and a list of the images are after the jump. Yay! Sports!

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Pari Ehsan Thoughtfully Pairs Chic Outfits With Contemporary Art

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New York based interior designer Pari Ehsan marries high fashion and high art by posing in outfits that thoughtfully complement artworks, installations, and architecture, posting the results to Instagram and her website. Ehsan’s project began when she was taking a personal portrait in front of an art piece and noticed that her fur coat created an interesting juxtaposition. Ehsan then decided to begin this fashion-art project in order to explore a creative outlet outside of her job as an interior designer. Her background in architecture – she studied it at both USC and UCLA before moving to NYC – helps inform her approach to the project, with some of her fashion looks complementing building and interior designs. Every Saturday, Ehsan hops around New York City’s galleries, looking for inspiration. “It’s very intuitive when I see something I like and get a good feeling about,” Ehsan says. “At that point, if I’m really compelled to do an outfit pairing, I find the look and do the styling.”

Ehsan’s Instagram account was recently nominated by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) for a Fashion Instagrammer of the Year Award, alongside other stand-out fashion-related accounts. Though she didn’t win, Ehsan’s account is still impressive, especially considering that fact that most of the other nominees – including the winner – work in fashion or media. Clearly, Ehsan’s lack of insider status has not hurt her project’s success.  (via blanton museum of art)

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Kimsooja’s Mirrored Installation Transforms Classic Greenhouse Into Psychedelic Rainbow Room

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Perhaps the fascination for artists utilizing chrome and mirror in their works is the increasing divide between seeing ourselves more and more via social media, yet understanding ourselves less. This is particularly evident in the work of New York-based Korean multidisciplinary artist Kimsooja, which often deals with the self-perception and the self and the other. In her installation To Breathe – A Mirror Woman at the Palacio de Cristal, Parque del Retiro, in Madrid, Kimsooja transformed a classic greenhouse by removing everything and replacing it with a mirrored floor. Next, the Tague, South Korean-born artist used a translucent, light-diffracting film to coat the windows, which cause an array of naturally occurring rainbows, which were in turn continuously reflected by a mirrored surface that covered the entire floor. Like many of her projects, an audio pairing accompanied the visuals. Visitors would experience a recording of Kimsooja breathing, enhancing the contemplative yet personal and relatable mystery of the installation.

Taken from Kimsooja’s description of the project, “Outside light filters through the glass of the pavilion and reflects off the diffraction film. It diffuses into rainbow spectrums, transforming the external panorama seen from within the palace. The resulting effect is that the entire structure as well as the rays of colour reflecting off the mirrored floor. Natural light, colour, and sound are all ethereal elements within the empty space. The artist’s breathing from the performance, The Weaving Factory, bounces off the mirrors and fills the entire building to intermix with it, breaking down barriers of inside and outside, self and other, and reality and fantasy.”

Kimsooja’s most recent project most recently wrapped the Korean Pavilion with a similar film treatment at the 2013 Venice Art Biennale. (via myampgoesto11 and colossal)

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Ted Lawson’s Eerie Sculptures Question The Meaning Of Identity

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Ted Lawson’s figurative work actualizes difficult concepts of physical identity. His work both strips individuality from his subjects while simultaneously forcing character through implications of the viewer, and therefore, complicating the very meaning of identity.

For example, in his piece titled, Eve, referring to the bible’s first woman, he depicts the cycle of a mutating female figure based on her weight. In this work, Lawson juxtaposes bodies with hanging flesh riddled with cellulite against ones simply constructed of skin and bone. The piece forces the viewer to formulate his or her own opinion of which body is the correct body. Or rather, which body correlates to which type of identity. When reflecting on this piece, the viewer is faced with his or her own interpretations of the same woman. It is then that a more interesting question is posed; does this piece prove that physical appearance identifies who we are, or, does it question the importance of the body— is our physical appearance, perhaps, arbitrary to who we are? Is this woman not the same woman in each representation?

The same questions are raised in his piece The Death of Narrative. There we find a naked woman laying, as if posing for a Renaissance painting, perhaps a Venus. However, instead of being surrounded in objects, hues, and sentiments that would then create allegory, this figure is encompassed with a pastiche of plastic objects. She is not grounded in space or time. She has no history, no narrative, and therefore, no implemented meaning. When observing a subjectless subject, one cannot help but to create purpose; it is human nature to understand through vehicles of narrative and history. Thus, by placing a being in a certain trajectory of non-meaning (the artist describes his work as existential), meaning is then inevitably created due to the human brain’s need for association.

Ted Lawson’s work constantly plays with identity not only through narrative, but also through the its relation to art history. His titles are always referential, if not playful. Even in the means by which he makes his work, sculpting through digital technology, is a manipulation of the tradition of his medium. Lawson’s work is a contemporary interpretation of classic quandaries, however, perhaps his work poses more questions, rather than attempting to answer. (via Empty Kingdom)

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