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Office for the development of Substitute Materials

3:2 An experiment in time travel. Subject lived in isolation for three weeks adjusting to a slow clock, experiencing only two weeks 2008

3:2 An experiment in time travel. Subject lived in isolation for three weeks adjusting to a slow clock, experiencing only two weeks 2008

Continuing my Rhizome Commissions coverage, here is Office for the development of Substitute Materials. Their work deals in the relationship between objects and how humans use them, or how objects become more human just because we are using them. The ideas about tools and their relationships to us and each other is incredibly smart but at the same time, attainable in their simplicity. The way they document their work is also very beautiful. I’m a big fan. You can see their Rhizome proposal after the jump (it’s the last item in the post).

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Cecilia de Corral Stitched Drawings

 

New York City based Cecilia de Corral mixes quirky imagery and stitched line work to create  drawings that blend collage, needle work,  and illustration all into one piece.

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The Seven Deadly Sins In The Artwork Of Gurt Swanenberg

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Taking cues from a 17th century practice known as taolennou, Gurt Swanenberg creates a new series of compelling sculptures. The original idea of taolennou was intended to provoke awareness of the seven deadly sins to a largely illiterate population through visual imagery.
Swanenberg takes the same idea and brings it into the present. Using various animal skulls he paints commercial logos related to each of the seven sins and makes statement about how they’re interpreted in the present day. Ideas such as gluttony are depicted on a pig skull with junk food logos painted on it. Wrath shows violent imagery on a lion head skull which includes gun and nazi references.
Even though the skeletons are painted Swanenberg takes references from sticker culture and collage. His overall aesthetic uses anthropology with brand name culture to comment on society’s ills. The original seven deadly sins surfaced around the 14th century. It was put forth by the Catholic Church to call awareness to man’s tendency to sin in the areas mentioned. According to the church there are two types of sin; venial which is relatively minor and the more serious mortal or deadly which is considered to compromise the grace and charity of a person’s nature. (via supersonic)

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Matt Nichols: Objectified

Artist Matt Nichols takes craftsmanship to a new level by pairing bold symbols with an acute sensibility for surface material.  While stunning as photos, the work is best experienced in person.  Physically interacting with these sculptures definitely forced me to reevaluate the relationship I had to the familiar iconography he often uses as a point of entry for the viewer.  Nichols comes from a serious design back ground, being largely responsible for much of the visual branding associated with the clothing company Neff.  While most would remain comfortable in that roll – he needed to push things further by shifting his focus towards a more physical realm.  With the closing of an exhibition at Hungryman Gallery just behind him, new work is already on the way.  Having recently returned to the Los Angeles area you can expect to see his name popping up in galleries across the SoCal area in the very near future.

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Ben Rayner

Attention world I have found my new favorite photographer!  London based photographer Ben Rayner is the coolest.  I love his work.  His photographs possess a sort of child-like wonder and enthusiasm to them.  Check out some more of his work after the jump!

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Creative 3D Sculpted Alphabet Made From Food, Body Parts And Other Everyday Objects

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German design studio FOREAL has created an impeccable set of 3D alphabet renderings for their personal project “Sculpted Alphabet”. Playful series features the whole English alphabet made from various everyday objects, food products and even body parts. The whole set of 26 letters was created by two designers, Benjamin Simon and Dirk Schuster.

“New tools, new playgrounds. One single rule: Choose a letter and sculpt it! Maxon gave us it’s new sculpting tools with the last releases of Cinema 4D. Our goal was to create the whole alphabet and achieve some completely new ways how type can be built and seen. A playful execution of that self-initiated project helped us to gain some significant experience in cgi sculpting techniques while having a lot of fun. We hope you enjoy these as we did.”

The project by FOREAL is a candid illustration of how three-dimensional CGI (computer-generated imagery) has moved forward and continues to grow in capabilities. The artistic 3D alphabet was designed using one of the agency’s illustration tools, Maxon Cinema 4D. According to the producers, it is one of the greatest tools for recreating even the slightest details, such as hair or fur.

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Lisa Beck’s Rorschach Installations

Brooklyn, NY based painter and sculptor Lisa Beck creates reflective, Rorschach like abstractions that function simultaneously as murals, paintings, sculptures, and installations.

“My work has always been driven by certain preoccupations and obsessions, that can be seen as divided between the particular and the universal. The particular is shorthand for the observable aspects of reality, the stuff around us (the landscape, our bodies). The universal is a shorthand for things that are too vast or too tiny for us to grasp completely ( space, atomic physics)— that necessarily become a kind of abstraction. Those are the things that I think about, with an emphasis on the relationship between those things — the place where they meet or interact, rather than the divide. I’m concerned with where I stand, or where anyone stands, in relation to these aspects of existing reality … the act of observation of the place in between; visual awareness and perception as a way of understanding existence, like a filter.

I tend to be attracted to opposing but related visual phenomena like positive and negative, pattern and randomness, color and grayscale, flatness and depth, representational and abstract imagery. I always want to go in both directions a once and much of my work has involved trying to find ways to integrate these opposites. My most prevalent motif has been the circle in all its forms and references. Atoms, dots, spheres, solids, voids, cells, selves, stars, eternity, emptiness- it’s amazing how much can attach to this form.” (via)

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Cute Or Crude? Lisa Yuskavage’s Oil Paintings Are Cheeky And A Bit Controversial

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Painting something like Lolita crossed with David Lynch crossed with a crude porn site, the works of Lisa Yuskavage seem to have people divided. Her luscious images of nude women and girls have been described as both vulgar and earnest, affectionate and alienating. She has developed a unique style that blends Renaissance techniques, landscapes, still lifes, cartoon-like figures, porn and religious iconography that both delights and disturbs viewers. Yuskavage’s world is full of innocent yet flirtatious vixens parading around in their undies and getting into mischief in meadows or apartments. Her characters seem a bit narcissistic, and self loving, and in some cases maybe even self loathing. Yet they are definitely interesting and magnetic; a commentary on the complexities of the modern woman and her sexuality.

Drawing on her own childhood experiences, Yuskavage explains her encounters with, and understandings of sexiness and power:

As a little girl, in Catholic school, they were the first feminists I met. It seems counterintuitive, but these women rejected the normal system of life. The ones that taught me were quite smart. When I came to my senses, I realized it would actually be awful for me to live that particular life. I guess I liked the idea of a calling, the intensity of it. (Source)

Works from the last 25 years of Yuskavage’s career is now on show at The Rose Art Museum of Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. Be sure to visit and make up your own mind if you love or loathe her style and content. Her solo show Lisa Yuskavage: The Brood is on display from September 12 to December 13, 2015 at David Zwirner Gallery in NYC.

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