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Awesome Video Of The Day: Train Logger

 

20 minutes of psychedelic clay animation bliss courtesy of Nicos Livesey

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Tristram Lansdowne’s Surreal Watercolor Mirage Of Landscape And Architecture

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Tristram Lansdowne’s watercolors are investigations of landscape and architecture in relation to ideas of permanence and function. Geological and botanical frames of reference add temporal concerns to Lansdowne’s exploration of the metaphorical power of ruins.

The watercolours present richly described scenes in which various tropes of landscape and architecture have been assembled to create conflicted systems, developed according to a logic dominated more by historical glitch than any autonomous idea of form and function. Both enchanting natural phenomenon and deluding vision, the mirage serves, here, as false refuge but also as an opportunity for divination, for time travel. Vestiges of architectural modernism appear, but only as specimens in a larger natural history that includes 17th century geological theories and Romantic totems. This is a world comprised of art historical flotsam, predicated on faulty idealism and mistaken identity, where everything is an invasive species.

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Matthieu Bourel’s Surreal Collages Are Quietly Strange

Matthieu Bourel - Collage

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Matthieu Bourel - Collage

Matthieu Bourel - Collage

Matthieu Bourel creates surreal collages that, despite their dream-like qualities, feel somehow rooted in reality. It might have something to do with his use of black and white photos, summoning up a specter of the past and lending a sort of mythic quality to his art.

In some of his pieces, it almost feels as though they’re still frames of a tall tale as opposed to utter fiction. They feel historically relevant, which, according to Bourel, is part of the intended effect. “When successful, all the elements fall together with irony and tension while all other realities are obliterated, leaving the viewer as participant inside the picture, with his own codes and connections,” Bourel explains. “The image then carries the weight of a personal reality.”

The phrase “personal reality” aptly encapsulates the quiet strangeness of his collages. Bloodless cross-sections of torsos and bodies are more contemplative than gruesome, as though they’re textbook diagrams.

Bourel describes his process as finding pictures and photographs that spark inspiration. He’s drawn to pictures that “evoke a fake history or inspire nostalgia for a period in time that never truly existed.”

“A piece often becomes about the search and desire to combine those emergent narrative symbols that seem charged with a familiar yet distant emotion,” Bourel says.

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Thomas Cian Merges Portraits With Nature

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Milan-artist Thomas Cian merges portraits with nature in his highly detailed drawings. Utilizing graphite and marker, Cian captures delicate expressions in his subjects which range from indifferent to melancholy. His ability to render life-like  images of birds, flowers, and landscapes into these portraits create surrealistic drawings that speak as much to the likeness of the subject as it does to their mood and circumstance.

Cian’s skill and style allows him to create works in his sketchbook quite quickly. One example is a highly realistic sketch of a man in front of his computer which was captured by time lapse video, found here.  Completed in thirty-minutes, the clip illustrates Cian’s drawing method and his ability to compile very specific details even within the constrained space of a Moleskin.   (via artfucksme)

Additional images of Cian’s work can be found at Behance.

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Contemporary Needlepoint in Home is Where The Needle Marks

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Ellen Schinderman curated the first part of her contemporary needlepoint exhibit Home is Where The Needle Marks at (Sub)Urban Home, with a second round of art to follow on Saturday, June 16th at PopTART gallery. After building a network of artists working within the medium via personal interactions and social media sites like Flickr, Ellen assembled a group that is really pushing the boundaries of concept and subject matter. For example, Mark Bieraugel presented several pieces that featured the titles of porno mags he used to keep hidden in his room as a teenager, which were hand sewn onto camouflage patterns – in essence, still keeping them hidden. There was also Robert Marbury who took pictures of graffiti in bathroom stalls and turned them into circular pieces that you’d expect to see in a wonderful little old lady’s house, except for the fact they say things like “I heart boobs” and “I heart dicks for din-din.”

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Adam Ekberg’s Aura

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Adam Ekberg’s photographic interventions remind me of those special moments that you occasionally experience like walking down the street and seeing a rainbow for a split second or witnessing a meteor shower while camping by yourself.

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Amazing Photos Of Japan Earthquake

We wanted to take a moment and share some of these amazing (and horrifying) photographs that The Atlantic posted of the Japan earthquake and Tsunami. Our friends out there are still putting back the pieces and we want you to join us in sending lots of positive vibes and wish them a speedy recovery. Since we’re in a “Sending” mood  why don’t we also reach into our wallets and send a few bucks to the Red Cross to help in the relief. You can fill out a quick form on the Red Cross site or just text 9099 to make a $10 donation. More photos after the jump.

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Flat Resalvaged Wood Sculptures Look Incredibly Three Dimensional

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Dutch artist Ron van der Ende‘s artworks at once deceiving and straightforward.  His wall mounted sculptures are much shallower than they may appear.  Not more than six inches deep the carefully painted bas relief pieces suggest a depth that extends beyond the wall.  This deception of perspective extends into the works’ content.  For example, a humble grain of salt depicted monumentally as if it were some extraterrestrial object.  However, van der Ende never forgets his material or attempts to hide the art’s point of origin.  For all of the trompe l’oeil effects and meticulous carving, the salvaged wood always seems to seep through.  In this way the material determines the piece as a whole, and anything secret isn’t hidden far off.

You can see Ron van der Ende’s exhibition Phasmid currently on view at Ambach & Rice gallery in Los Angeles through the 27th of July.

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