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Awesome Video Of The Day: Todor & Petru


Boobs, fat dude guts, explosive animation, and super fast euro raps make for an interesting video.

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Elizabeth Peyton’s Long Lost Sister?

Left, En Hong, Right, Elizabeth Peyton

Left, En Hong, Right, Elizabeth Peyton

We received an artist submission today from En Hong, a Korean artist currently living & working in NYC. I was kind of  blown back by her cosmic soul sister double take to Elizabeth Peyton. 

What do you guys think- too similar, or sincere homage? More Peyton/Hong images below. I don’t know, I might fall on the uncanny doppelganger side of things.

 

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Adam Baz

Adam Baz

Whimsical mixed media work from west coaster Adam Baz. His mystical drawings unfold with simple yet refined details and bursts of color. Also reminds me a little bit of of Zachary Rossman’s work, which is definitely a good thing.

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Kour Pour Recreates Carpets In Every Painstaking Detail

Kour Pour - PaintingKour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting Kour Pour - Painting

Taking images from auction catalogs, artist Kour Pour translates intricately-patterned carpets onto paneled surfaces. The multi-step process is labor intensive, not to mention large – his work is 8 feet tall. First, Pour scans in the image of a rug and burns it on a silk screen. Then, he uses a broom to begin his underpainting (the texture gives it an appearance of a textile). Afterwards, he silkscreens the design to the panel and begins the work of painting every painstaking detail. The final step is to use an electrical sander to erase the painted surface and expose the layers of the under-painting. What results is work that looks like an faded, well-worn rug.

Pour is both British and Persian, and when he was younger, his father owned a rug shop in England. His work is tied to this past, as he explains in his artist statement:

Carpets were a part of my childhood growing up in England. I remember my Father’s rug shop, and how he would hand-dye sections of carpets that had faded away, in order to bring them back to their original colours. I felt that in doing this, my Father was making an effort to maintain all their history and meaning, as if he was bringing the carpets back to life. When I first moved to Los Angeles I had feelings of displacement and much like the faded carpets, I too felt a part of my history disappear. I started the carpet painting series and noticed how art and objects could play an increasingly important role in our diverse society. Through making these paintings I am constantly learning more about my background and the rich mix of culture that surrounds me and the carpets.

By recreating carpets, Pour highlights their meaning as object, as well as the implications of their surface design. They signify an object of privilege (as their originals come from an auction catalog), and our commodity-based consumer culture. Beyond that, the patterns of animals and men on horses is representational of globalization, a culture’s history, and more.  (Via Bmore Art and Flat Surface)

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Mesmerizing Wall Patterns Cast By Intricate Shadows

Anila Quayyum Agha- Laser Cut WoodAnila Quayyum Agha- Laser Cut Wood Anila Quayyum Agha- Laser Cut Wood Anila Quayyum Agha- Laser Cut Wood

Mixed media artist Anila Quayyum Agha has figured out how to decorate an entire room with shadows cast from a box. Laser cutting intricate patterns into a wooden cube, a light within the cube projects an intricate display of shadows that envelope the entire room in ornate design. The results are breathtaking and the philosophy behind her work is fascinating.

This project, titled “Intersections,” combines the patterning of Islamic sacred spaces with architectural aesthetics:

“The Intersections project takes the seminal experience of exclusion as a woman from a space of community and creativity such as a Mosque and translates the complex expressions of both wonder and exclusion that have been my experience while growing up in Pakistan. The wooden frieze emulates a pattern from the Alhambra, which was poised at the intersection of history, culture and art and was a place where Islamic and Western discourses, met and co-existed in harmony and served as a testament to the symbiosis of difference. For me the familiarity of the space visited at the Alhambra Palace and the memories of another time and place from my past, coalesced in creating this project. My intent with this installation was to give substance to mutualism, exploring the binaries of public and private, light and shadow, and static and dynamic. This installation project relies on the purity and inner symmetry of geometric design, the interpretation of the cast shadows and the viewer’s presence within a public space.”

(Excerpt from Source)

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Photography Spotlight: Paul Paper

paul paper photography

Paul Paper lives in Vilnius, Lithuania where he daydreams, sleeps, walks and sometimes takes pictures. He shoots spontaneously, capturing what he calls “the tiny tiny miracle in boring every day.”

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Suzanne Heintz Photographs the American Dream With Her Mannequin Family

Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz Suzanne Heintz

Photographer Suzanes Heintz is a self-proclaimed spinster. As a single woman, she got fed up with the bombardment of questions about when she was going to get married. Tired of being pittied, she decided to confront this issue head on. She purchased two mannequins – one male and one female child – and the series Life Once Removed was born. Dressing up and posing with her fake family, she stages witty representations of the American Dream. Ski trips, vacations, and stereotypical romantic moments are all acted out by Heintz, and she sets the scene perfectly. These colorful images feel saturated, in both how they look and the emotional exuberance of the her expression and body language.

Heintz rejects the notion that to be a successful woman means that you have to fulfill a laundry list of achievements, not limited to an education, career, home, family, accomplishment, and enlightenment. In an interview with Feature Shoot, she explains why she created Life Once Removed:

I’m simply trying to get people to open up their minds and quit clinging to antiquated notions of what a successful life looks like. I want people to lighten up on each other and themselves, and embrace their lives for who it has made them, with or without the Mrs., PhD. or Esq. attached.

All of these photographs are shot on location. When Heintz lays her head in mannequin’s husband’s lap while in the park, it’s totally real, and an important aspect to Heintz’s series. She goes on to say:

While I need the public to act as character and context for the actual photo or video, I also need their responses to make the effort a success as an instigator for social change. The reaction can vary from a raised eyebrow with a head turn, to a blast of laughter, to taking their own snapshots while posing with the mannequins. It depends a lot on the location. But most importantly, it stops people in their tracks long enough to ask me what the heck I’m doing. Because the project is so audacious and flat-out funny, it helps me reach the public, and actually get them to let their guard down long enough for me to have a conversation with them. (Via Feature Shoot)

 

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