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Benedetto Demaio Creates A Vibrant World With A Cool Sense Of Color

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Have you ever loved a color so much that you wish you could paint everything in it? Well, artist Benedetto Demaio has immersed his entire photography in a color that he so deeply enjoys. The brilliant artwork of Italian artist Benedetto Demaio completely engulfs you in a world of specific color. Photographing simple subjects like deflated balloons and crayon shards, he transforms the ordinary into a perfectly constructed photo, complete with a curated palette. Although his images include a wide variety of subjects, they all hold a certain, cool blue that ties them all together in a way that is unmistakably intentional by Demaio. This hue is the artist’s signature. It is amazing how many different ways a color can be expressed, in so many different textures. Demaio’s blue is shown in soft, puffy material, in torn paper, and in places that are true to nature, like an ocean wave.

Each photograph, carefully constructed and thought out, contains beautiful compositions of an inviting, cohesive color palette. The artist’s sense of playfulness is apparent in his experimental use of color, as he often applies his favorite color in places that it may not normally be found, like in color swatches on the beach. Still, you cannot help to be charmed by the repetitiveness of the blue hue. There is a fun, triumphant spirit of creativity in Demaio’s work that is such an irresistible breath of fresh air. (via Honestly WTF)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Dragonfly Love

This is probably the best short film I have ever seen using only a camera phone. Director Thomas Hilland was asked to make the most out of Nokia N8’s smartphone camera. If the quality of the film doesn’t do it for you, I know I especially enjoyed the rotund men running around in costumes, battling each other with remote controlled dragonflies. Music was by the British band, Kap Bambino.

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Evan Campbell’s Scary Faces

Free-lance sculptor extraordinaire Evan Campbell creates insanely realistic sculptures!  His work has been featured in films by Martin Scorsese, John Carpenter, Wes Craven, Robert Rodriguez, Quentin Tarantino, Michael Mann, and Kevin Smith.

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Roger Deckker

Roger deckkerRoger Deckker is an amazing photographer. From landscape to fashion, his work is so rad! With the majority of his fashion photography in black and white or low color saturation, the emotional strength of the image is on point. His photo editing is very fun and creative, which he uses to depict more of a classic 70s style to his images. Check it out!

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Thom Puckey at Museum Centro Pecci

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Sculptor Thom Puckey has a new exhibit on now at the Museum Centro Pecci in Prato, Italy, called Extreme Beauty. The unexpected combination of classically-sculpted figures paired with implements of death are a definite comment on where society has taken us since Neoclassicism. “The presence of modern weapons in the sculptures makes them seem contemporary in a cheap kind of way, this I realise. I like this suggestion of cheapness, I play into it. Chicks and guns,” explains the artist. Puckey makes “cheap” look pretty amazing, don’t you think?

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Norman Mooney’s Explosive Burst Sculptures

NYC based artist Norman Mooney makes works that are at once physical and metaphysical. His works explore the elemental and cyclical synergies of nature. Materiality, pattern, scale and experience are key concerns within his practice. Although he works in a wide array of materials his massive burst sculptures are completely jaw dropping. Radiating from every angle these incredible explosions shimmer and shine like a star far off in the galaxy. (via)

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Emotional Portraits Of Black Dogs Who Are Often Left Out Of Adoption

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Dogs of all shapes and sizes have hearts of gold, and yet it’s said that black dogs are routinely ignored and denied adoption based on the color of their silky fur. The photographer Fred Levy hopes to shatter negative stereotypes about the dark hued animals, perpetuated throughout our culture perhaps by the ominous depictions of the creatures in media, with the Black Dog Project. Capturing furry friends ranging in age and experience, the artist pins his regal subjects against a black backdrop, narrating a poignant story of canine love and courage.

Set against the soft darkness behind them, the animals appear lonesome and curious. Presumably told to sit for the shot, they cock their heads, let drop their downy ears, and look to the viewer for approval. The moving, miraculous tension in the animals’ bodies recalls the ever-willing canine anticipation the blessed “come,” a nod of recognition, an offer of affection, a release from being alone.

Levy’s stunning lighting records the nuances of the black fur, celebrating the shade that is so often overlooked; the silky stands catch the light in such a way that haloes their faces, gives heavenly, royal meaning to their curved backs and furrowed brows. Levy maintains each subject’s rich personality; the wizened senior Faith perks up her ears, and the therapy dog Max patiently holds our gaze with intent amber eyes.

Says Levy of the project, “I’ve found that it’s really important to share the idea that there are always so many dogs in need of a good safe home, regardless of what the dog looks like […] Maybe someone will see this and consider the gravity of owning a pet, no matter what color it is.” To learn more about the Black Dogs Project, check here, and take a look at some of the enchanting photos below. (via Huffington Post and Design Taxi)

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OakOak Playing With the City

According to his website, the street artist OakOak “is a French artist who likes to play with urban elements”.  Using simple means and materials, OakOak undermines his neighborhood with playful results.  He uses a minimal amount of actual original artwork, instead re-purposing signs, facades, cement blocks, chipping paint, and more.  OakOak transforms a neighborhood’s imperfections into its own adornments.  He says of his interventions:

“The less I intervene on the wall or the road, the better, especially if I can totally change the sense of the urban environment” [via]

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