Get Social:

Photographer Statia Grossman’s Seething (But Funny) Visuals About Her Ex-Lover

statia grossman shit you left behindstatia grossman photographystatia Grossman photographystatia grossman photography

The therapeutic effects of art can reveal itself in wonderful and mysterious ways. It can also be a sarcastic “f” you given the proper creator. Photographer Statia Grossman, who fits into the second category,  has just released her first book on Amazon, entitled “Sh*t You Left Behind”, a series of pictures taken with her ex-lover’s items. Judging by the pix and comments, it wasn’t a happy breakup. No, this was definitely filled with much drama and Grossman appears as a woman scorned. It’s an interesting study into what drives people and what they hold dear to them. Since Grossman is a photographer,  her sensitivity to the visual image is at a high level and each of the photographs hold a memory or hurt hitting home not only to the creator but viewer. Like love, art is universal and things people think important in various situations doesn’t differ much. In this case, sex was probably a big part of the relationship and most of the images shows her in objectified positions with one of his items. We also learn a little bit about him. He was a musician who liked taking pills and didn’t express much emotion. He was also allergic to Grossman’s cat, which she resented.  The project does a good job at revealing compromises we make in the name of love and how we can better serve ourselves next time around. (via artnet)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Ben Sears

 

Kentucky-based designer and illustrator Ben Sears knows how to showcase his work. With a portfolio jumping from commercial work, process screencaps, and sketchbook doodles, one can’t help
but admire his work ethic. His sketchbook work has unlimited appeal- work that’s both clever and perfectly rendered never goes out of style. Plus, who can frown at Yoshi and ferrets?

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Malia Jensen’s Sculptures Of Sensory Longing

Malia Jensen - Sculpture Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen - Sculpture

Malia Jensen juxtaposes deep sensory textures with completely opposite objects or animals to create a feeling of longing, sexuality, desire, or play. The pillow, tragically, will never be comfortable enough, born from cutting board wood. Likewise, the breast, shaped from a block of salt lick, will never be able to feel a tongue the way that it should. Each carefully chosen medium breathes a new heavy sadness into the life of these objects, condemned to mirror reality without all the glorious amenities or enjoyments.

Of her work, in ArtSlant Magazine, Jensen states, “You can seduce someone in, and they might be laughing for a while, but they realize this is somewhat dark. There’s a deep sadness in a lot of work. It’s like finding a human condition in an animal parallel.”

Currently Trending

Le Goff & Gabarra

Le Goff and Gabarra

Le Goff & Gabarra is a design agency based in Paris. Their work demonstrates an understanding of bold colors and strong typography. I’m partial to their physical typographic works, especially their work for 6 scope. That 6 made out of water looks pleasantly scientific (check that one out after the jump). Good job to you Le Goff & Gabarra, keep ’em comin’!

Currently Trending

Pari Ehsan Thoughtfully Pairs Chic Outfits With Contemporary Art

paridust4
paridust  paridust11 paridust8

New York based interior designer Pari Ehsan marries high fashion and high art by posing in outfits that thoughtfully complement artworks, installations, and architecture, posting the results to Instagram and her website. Ehsan’s project began when she was taking a personal portrait in front of an art piece and noticed that her fur coat created an interesting juxtaposition. Ehsan then decided to begin this fashion-art project in order to explore a creative outlet outside of her job as an interior designer. Her background in architecture – she studied it at both USC and UCLA before moving to NYC – helps inform her approach to the project, with some of her fashion looks complementing building and interior designs. Every Saturday, Ehsan hops around New York City’s galleries, looking for inspiration. “It’s very intuitive when I see something I like and get a good feeling about,” Ehsan says. “At that point, if I’m really compelled to do an outfit pairing, I find the look and do the styling.”

Ehsan’s Instagram account was recently nominated by the Council of Fashion Designers of America (CFDA) for a Fashion Instagrammer of the Year Award, alongside other stand-out fashion-related accounts. Though she didn’t win, Ehsan’s account is still impressive, especially considering that fact that most of the other nominees – including the winner – work in fashion or media. Clearly, Ehsan’s lack of insider status has not hurt her project’s success.  (via blanton museum of art)

Currently Trending

dooom

Dooom’s portfolio of twisting and turning hands and geometric shapes.

Currently Trending

Yago Hortal’s Thick Paint Mounds

We have featured the work of Yago Hortal in the past (here). He continues to produce lush abstractions that pulsate with energy. In his newest series he takes the Impasto technique to the extreme. Massive gobs engulf his canvases. Tidal waves of color confront existing surfaces adding increased depth to his kinetic compositions.

Currently Trending

Rana Begum’s Shifting Perspective Geometric Sculptures

page56-1029-full page56-1030-full

page46-1027-full

no.429fold_c

The first quality one may see in the brightly-colored, bent steel pieces by Rana Begum is the potential to shift based on perspective. From one angle, viewers will be confronted by a flat, monochromatic shape jutting from the wall, while another view offers more intricate geometric patterns spreading across several pieces. This is the legacy of Sol Lewitt, Donald Judd or Agnes Martin – to take the simplest shapes and through color, form and collection, imbue them with complexity and depth. As Begum explains, “Its so beautiful the way the simple form and shape can be repeated to create a space like that”

Though Begum lists these more modern artists as influences, the Bangladeshi-born, London-based artist also explains that the Aniconism (belief in avoiding/outlawing representations of divine beings, prophets or any human beings in religious imagery) traditions of Islam were equally influential. This tradition was responsible for the exquisite geometric and intensely detailed works seen in classical Islamic architecture, a connection which is apparent in Begum’s deceptively simple works.  “For me, architecture evokes memories of reading the Quran as a child in a mosque in Bangladesh,” said Begum in an interview with Surface Magazine’s Marina Cashdan, “which was bare, simple, and had a lot of light coming in through the windows.”  This shifting imagery can be seen in her works, where repetition and simplistic elements collectively offer complexity.

Begum’s most recent works often uses paint on Origami-like, bent mild steel and powder-coated aluminum, but she has also begun using brass and copper as a base for her wall sculptures. “[They are] materials I spent a long time researching and I’m excited to use them for this show,” she says. “They bring an extra dimension to the works” (via wallpaper* and surface)

Currently Trending