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Hermès × Tokujin Yoshioka

Maison Hermès installation by Tokujin Yoshioka from Dezeen on Vimeo.

This is a really awesome new window display at Maison Hermès in Japan. The installation/window display was done by designer Tokujin Yoshioka, featuring a set of Hermès scarfs and video installation. Although the design and concept is simple, it’s a very cool and dynamic installation. Check it out!

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Documentary Watch: Rashid Johnson



How does an artist contribute his own personal story in the face of prevailing historical narratives? In this film, Rashid Johnson discusses the fluid nature of black identity in America and its escapist tendencies, from the Afrocentric politics of Marcus Garvey to the cosmic philosophy of Sun Ra. Johnson’s invented secret society—”The New Negro Escapist Social and Athletic Club”—is a framework through which the artist humorously upends, through repetition and juxtaposition, conventional expectations of historical influence and legacy. Inspired by a story by the artist Lawrence Weiner in which one character says to another that “a table is something to put something on,” Johnson creates sculptures of shelf-like structures from materials such as black wax, mirror, tile, and branded wood. Each structure is filled with culturally resonant objects—such as Miles Davis and Ramsey Lewis jazz records, books by comedians Dick Gregory and Bill Cosby, and treatises by scholars such as W.E.B. Du Bois and Debra J. Dickerson—as well as the artist’s own photographs and hand-made objects.  Watch the full documentary after the jump.

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Dr. Seuss’s “Unorthodox Taxidermy” Brings Magical Creatures To Life





In the late 1930s, Dr. Seuss (Theodor Seuss Geisel) brought his imaginary creatures to life, sculpting them out of wood, mounting them on the wall, and imbuing them with a haunting realism by incorporating real animal parts. The remains of deceased animals came from his father’s workplace, the Forest Park Zoo.

After their construction, the creatures, bearing delightful names like the “Andulovian Grackler” and the “Two Horned Drouberhannis,” were sold as a collection under the title “Collection of Unorthodox Taxidermy.” After living in a child’s bedroom, the pieces were retired to an old barn and resold in 2004. The Chase Group later made resin copies of many of the works. Some of these pieces are available for sale on eBay.

Each sculpture stays true to Seuss’s touchingly earnest connection with the imaginative realm of childhood. The animals, though mounted on a wall, maintain a poignant emotive ability; the marriage of raised brows and mellow smiles with the antlers of genuine beasts makes the works magically vital, communicative— and somehow— real.

The profound soulfulness of the work is only enhanced by its hints of morbidity. In what is perhaps a critique of taxidermy practices, the prolific artist chose to present these fantastical creatures within the context of human domination, forcing viewers to reconcile our desire to believe in magic with the knowledge of environmental destruction. In this way, the aging of the works has not detracted from their potency but has serendipitously heightened it; years after the prolific author’s death, we are asked to search these faded faces for indicators of bestial personalities and traces of the beloved artist’s hand. Take a look. (via This is Colossal and the world’s best ever)

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Hiroyuki Shinozaki’s Open House

For anyone who grew up in the 80’s & 90’s, Hiroyasu Sakaguchi’s House T will look vaguely familiar, namely because House T is laid out like a level in Mario, or most other Nintendo games for that matter. All the spaces in a house that we have gotten used to as individual, semi-private rooms have been stripped of their walls and joined into one long inter-connected space. I love it because it reminds us of the tension between psychological and physical space, how we compartmentalize various aspects of our life into respective spaces. House T reminds me of Gordon Matta Clark’s work, albeit much cleaner, Japanese, and way less punk rock, but the altering of our perception of space is in them both. (via)

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Nik Daum

The Inventor of Cross Dressing & MODE V

The Inventor of Cross Dressing & MODE V

The figure on the left is a product of Nik Daum‘s imagination, and I feel like that’s exactly where it takes you, into some imaginary world. Cool colors, awkward angles, this piece is definitely a reflection of his own personal aesthetic, best summed up by himself in his bio on his website – which I highly recommend you read! And if you’re up for some stalking, he’s got 5 webcams in different parts of his house, tracking his every move. Daum’s also done quite a bit of commercial work; you’re bound to be familiar with several of the campaigns he’s been involved with, like Target, Jamba Juice, and Nike. He’s got a whole lot going on, take a few minutes and just check it out! Everything is laced with his humor, and though it says you’ll be disappointed on his homepage, trust me, you won’t.

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Janet Echelman’s Monumental Neon Fishnet Installations

Beginning her career as a painter Janet Echelman started working with fishing nets after a shipment of paints was lost in transit during an artist residency in India. Today teams of designers and fabricators work with her as she reshapes urban airspace with monumental, fluidly moving sculpture that responds to environmental forces including wind, water, and sunlight. made out of woven and colored netting Echelman creates massive installations that look like neon colored jelly fish or spiderwebs flowing effortlessly through the sky.

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Van Orton Design’s Stained-Glass Style 80’s Movie Posters




van orton 2

Italian-based twin brother design team (who go by the nom de guerre) Van Orton Design created a hit recently with their latest project of stained-glass style movie posters. Digitally composing the images using iconic characters and scenes from each film, Van Orton replaced saints and religious iconography with pop-culture standards like the Terminator, The Joker and Jack Burton, juxtaposing them with the time-honored (and increasingly disappearing) art of stained glass sectioning.

Van Orton’s selection of now-classic films from the science-fiction, action and cult fantasy genres adds an interesting element to the genesis of these designs, in that they seem to replicate stained glass coloring books more than the classical stained glass reminiscent of Europe’s grand cathedrals. This design choice adds to the light-hearted and nostalgic mood of the series, and appropriately separates it from ‘high art’ (though the Batman Poster for example certainly has visual similarities to the work of famous British artists Gilbert & George). The combination of thin and thicker black lines (replicating the lead used to secure colored glass) holds a wide prismatic array of colors, which also brings a unique, crisp quality which can only be achieved through delicate digital design.

You can purchase your own posters (pre-colored or not) by Van Orton Design here.

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Ursula Brookbank

Los Angeles photographer Ursula Brookbank’s Lady Studio series bring together the costumes and theatrics of Cindy Sherman and the faces of the Joker to create arresting and haunting images.

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