Get Social:

Sweden’s Tree Hotels

Swedish designers and architects have taken the fad of adult tree house building and made it extraordinarily Swedish in the best way possible at the Tree Hotel. Mirror houses, UFOs with star-print sheets, giant bird nests; these exist in real life. What a wonderful world.( via )

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Jorge Miguel’s “Dark People”

Jorges Miguel - Photography

I wear a lot of black and am frequently lumped into a certain black wearing subculture that will remain nameless (hint: it isn’t “dark people”); so I was understandably delighted when I saw these exquisitely polished portraits by Spanish photographer Jorge Miguel.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Holy Smokes Sophie Kern!

Loving these simple yet effective pattern and typogrpahic drawings by British artist Sophie Kern.

Currently Trending

Urban Decay Storybook-Like Street Art

hyuro street art11 hyuro street art12

hyuro street art13

Hyuro has a very peculiar style of street art.  Her work is highly detailed and uses subdued colors.  It is her artwork’s narrative quality that makes it stand out.  Each mural seems to be a very small piece of a much larger story.  The viewer passing the mural almost feels like an interruption to some mysterious goings-on.   The influential fellow Spain based street artist ESCIF poetically says regarding Hyuro and her work:

“Hyuro doesn´t paint on the street. Hyuro talks to the street. And she does it with such respect and affection, which are the others who, as we approached, we paint the walls that she just whispers.”

Currently Trending

Photographer Mads Perch’s Ethereal Light Projection Portraits Will Hypnotize You

Mads Perch - photographMads Perch - photographMads Perch - photograph


Mads Perch is a wonderful master of light. He not only photographs sensual portraits beautifully, but also can manipulate projections with finesse. Working mostly as a commercial photographer, Perch  together with art director Gemma Fletcher has become used to producing unfussy images quickly and efficiently. He has a sensitive style that would have no problem fitting in with the digital romantics.

This is a genre where artists are harnessing digital technologies in their search for the sublime: representing manifestations of Romanticism in the digital. (Source)

Perch does just that – his images are peaceful, ethereal, emotive and gentle. He evokes something very humane with the aid of different technologies. He says of his own work:

[My] photography encompasses clean, crisp, fresh and beautifully understated portraiture to more vivid imagery imbued with vibrancy, attitude and a healthy dose of color.

Perch’s choice of patterns and tones he projects are what make his portraits so enchanting. The blocks of greens and oranges caressing noses and draping over shoulders; the stripes bending around a gently tilted head; eyelids covered in technicolor plaid – these are what turn his subjects from something expected into something surprisingly celestial. Apart from these portraits, Perch has tried this method of projection on various buildings, structures and landscapes for an ad campaign in 2014. He has also photographed the award winning Klaxons ‘Surfing The Void’ album cover, and British rock group Clock Opera’s ‘Ways To Forget’ cover. All using a similarly clever and experimental approach to light and color. To see more of his beautiful work take a look here.

Currently Trending

Dive Into the Underwater World of Adam Wallacavage’s Magnificent Octopus Chandeliers

Adam Wallacavage - epoxy clay, lamp parts, epoxy resin and spray paint

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

Adam Wallacavage - Wire, lamp parts, glass beads, epoxy resin, epoxy clay

What do you get when you combine underwater sea creatures with elegant and sophisticated lighting? You get the weird and whimsical octopus chandeliers of artist Adam Wallacavage. The Philadelphia based artist uses traditional ornamental plastering techniques to create working chandeliers in the shape of octopus and fantastical sea life. Each chandelier is created from a wide range of materials such as epoxy resin, iridescent powders, spray paint, and glitter. His inspiration and ideas come from a very eclectic range of sources such as flashy church decoration, tales of underwater adventure, and, not surprisingly, taxidermy. His absurd style is both gaudy and Victorian while still being absurdly fun.

Wallacavage’s childlike imagination turns a seemingly normal object into wonderfully gaudy and kitschy chandeliers full of shiny colors and tentacles. Each chandelier Wallacavage constructs is unique with their wide array of pastel, glittery colors and their endless ocean-life motifs. These include green seashells, purple tentacles, pink pearls, and even big, round eyes starring straight at you. Some of his chandeliers seem to be inspired by the pastel colors and ornate design of the Rococo period, while his other chandeliers have a louder palette with strange faces and eyes. His octopus creations create a surrealistic atmosphere as each sea monster is suspended from the ceiling, reaching out its tentacles, which happen to hold the chandelier lighting. After seeing Wallacavage’s highly imaginative and extravagant chandeliers, you realize how much chandeliers already looked like octopus! Not only can you find the artist’s octopus chandeliers in several New York City galleries, Wallacavage is also an accomplished photographer. He even has a book published on his photography titled Monster Sized Monsters available in many museum stores.

Currently Trending

Woods Davy

matamoros

For over 25 years, Woods Davy has worked with natural materials (primarily stone) as his medium of choice. In an incredible balancing act, he places the stones in fascinating formations that intrigue the mind. With his work with stones, he became one of the first “green” Postmodern artists. Even artists go green! You can catch Woods Davy’s exhibit at the Craig Krull Gallery in Bergamot Station, Santa Monica, CA until October 9th.

Currently Trending

The Lustrous Language Of Ben Skinner

Ben Skinner Ben Skinner BS-4Ben Skinner

It’s a tricky thing, viewing the work of artist Ben Skinner—you catch yourself reading, absorbing, appreciating and simultaneously fighting the urge to snap a photo and immediately re-appropriate his multimedia text works to your own blog/Instagram/Twitter. Using an intriguing selection of materials (ranging from gold foil to neon to sprinkles), Skinner elegantly spells out heartbreaking phrases ripped from the Zeitgeist, with a little extra flair. The witty, multicolored multimedia works tow the line between design and art, with a little extra emphasis on drawing, craft and the making of an actual object. Many of his works could easily find a life as a piece of printed design, but it’s Skinner’s willingness to experiment with materials that allows his flat, graphic works to go one step further into the realm of something more substantial.

Currently Trending