Get Social:

Human Organs Created Out Of Flora

Human Organs

Human Organs sculpture11

Human Organs sculpture

 

Bristol artist Camila Carlow creates these lovely renderings of human organs by foraging for wild plants, weeds, and the occasional animal part and then sculpting and arranging these various bits of flora. Her series, entitled “Eye ‘Heart’ Spleen,” recontextualizes images of organs such as a heart, lungs, stomach, uterus, liver, and testicles, demonstrating the reflection of internal biological structures with external natural structures. From Carlow’s site, “This work invites the viewer to regard our vital structures as beautiful living organisms, and to contemplate the miraculous work taking place inside our bodies, even in this very moment.” You can order prints and keep up with this particular project’s developments via its Facebook page. (via unknown editors)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Documentary Watch: Ross Capicchioni Makes Your Problems Look Petty

 

This is the unbelievable survival story of a young skateboarder named Ross Capicchioni from Detroit. I don’t want to ruin the story but if you only do one thing today watch this video. I promise that you’ll forever be changed. Watch the 2 part video after the jump.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Paper Art: Seven Artists Revamp Paper Into Sculptural Works

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Tomas Saraceno paper art

Tomas Saraceno

Paper is a surface used by artists all the time, however we rarely see the true versatility of it as a material explored to the extent that is seen in the paper art featured here by: Ryuji NakamuraKyosuke Nishida and Brian LiJeff NishinakaTomas SaracenoMatt Shlian and Jen Stark.

Tomas Saraceno is a master of transforming a space and infusing it with an interactive surreal quality.  His installations that are constructed to provide viewers with the experience that they are walking on a cloud are absolutely captivating.  The soft dream-like magic of his work is more tactile and intimate, however, in this paper installation Cloud House featuring cloud like formations made only out of smaller geometric matte paper structures.

Currently Trending

Haunting and Beautiful Photographs of Long Abandoned Mental Institutions

6
4
mental-institution-photos-jeremy-harris4-650x661
mental-institution-photos-jeremy-harris9-650x433
For American Asylum, photographer Jeremy Harris captures the abandoned interiors of American mental institutions that operated during the 19th century. With the increased presence of psychiatric hospitals, the mid-1800s were characterized in part by a growing fear of the mentally ill. State-funded hospitals were often overcrowded, and there existed a widespread panic that sane people were being wrongfully institutionalized. Nearly two centuries later, Harris hauntingly presents these hospitals, these strange sites of psychological trauma, in decay.

Harris’s soft natural lighting is startling reminiscent of Francisco de Goya’s early 19th century painting The Madhouse. Emptied of its residents, the space seems darkly oppressive, colored in sickly greens and putrid browns. Shot with a profound depth of field, endless hallways house tiny rooms like some perverse dollhouse. The curved ceilings, now in ruin, frame the photographs in currents of claustrophobia.

Even in the shots in which we are offered some escape—the relief of an open door or wide-set window—viewers are compelled to stay within the confining space. Amidst chipped paint and rotting walls are signifiers of some ancient humanity, long forgotten by time: a rusted organ, a tilted chair, a message on the wall. The traces of life and bodies persist in old sinks and forgotten parcels. Somehow, these haunted spaces are beautiful, bathed in light. The people who lived here, once removed from and silenced by society, speak out in the ruins of the building that once contained them, as if to say, “This happened. We were here.” (via Lost at E Minor)

Currently Trending

Christine Gray

ChristineGrayPainting
Christine Gray’s paintings might seem playful at first, but a closer look reveals ominous mythical undertones. Woven dreamcatchers, desolate landscapes, and lightning in the sky… something else is definitely going here. Christine’s show “Into the Light” opens at Okay Mountain on January 14th, so go check it out!

 

Currently Trending

Michael Page’s Infinite Swirls Of Paint

With a healthy interest in new life, spirituality, and the infinite variations of consciousness, Michael Page paints
dreamscapes of alternative realities. Through boundless shapes of thick brush strokes and effervescent colors, his paintings portray the Pneuma or spirit/soul that breathes in every living organism. (via i heart my art)

Currently Trending

Documentary Watch: Karakuri

 

Japan has always been on the forefront of cutting edge robotics. Its roots can be traced back 200-300 years during the Edo period when skilled craftsmen created automata (self-operating machines). Using nothing more than pulleys and weights they were able to make the Karakuri (Japanese automata) perform amazing tasks. Japans modern day robots can be traced back to the Karakuri. Today Hideki Higashino is one of the few remaining craftsmen who is determined to keep the history and tradition of Japanese Karakuri alive. Watch the full documentary after the jump!

Currently Trending

Sticky Situation: Blake Little’s Honey Covered Models Look As If They Are Frozen In Amber

Blake Little - photography

Blake Little - photography

4.TheDancer_2012Blake Little - photography-759x1024

Celebrity photographer Blake Little has taken his love of portraiture to new heights. Pouring honey all over his models of different ages, races and genders, he has created a series of dramatic images that look like photos of wax models. While he normally snaps pictures of famous faces like Kevin Spacey, Tom Cruise, Glenn Close, Samuel L. Jackson, Jane Fonda, Gwyneth Paltrow, this time he placed a Craigslist ad asking for some not-so-familiar faces. Seeing over 90 people, all ranging in age from 2 – 85 years, he asked them to take their clothes off and get covered in a thick gooey layer of honey. Little talks about his process:

Preservation began through a process of experimenting with honey. Initially, I started shooting the way it pours and drips on just the face or specific areas of the body. After several sessions, it became clear that completely covering the figure as much as possible and with varying thicknesses created a quality that I had never seen before. The honey has a way of diffusing the personal qualities of the subjects, often making them unrecognizable and democratizing their individual traits into something altogether different and universal. (Source)

The result of the intense studio session is hypnotic. The models look like they have been frozen in amber, or resin, or caught in the volcanic eruption of Pompeii. All of the subjects in his new book Preservation look like they are in a deep slumber, and all have lost any idiosyncrasies they may have had. It seems like Little has compiled a reference of what is it to be human – a kind of catalog of frozen specimens where we can, in the future, look back and compare similarities and differences between us all.

His show accompanying his new monograph opens at Kopeikin Gallery in Culver City, CA from March 7.

Currently Trending