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Pascal Pierrou Explores Alternative Feminine Beauty -NSFW

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French photographer Pascal Pierrou takes interest in creating the ultimate ‘modern girl’ photo catalogue. Pierrou, a fashion photographer, is interested in showcasing alternative ‘feminine beauty’, the type that we are not really used to seeing in popular television or mass-produced advertisements. He primarily focuses on girls with short hair/no hair, tattoos, and piercings. While these women’s looks are not uncommon per se, Pierrou is looking to create a fashion-like photoshoot that shows off these women in a way that is uncommon and unexpected. For instance, his way of pairing a naked woman with a sword tells us that he is looking to show off a double-sided profile, one that  shows off a rough edge, and another that features the soft lines of a slender and feminine naked body.

This idea of rough and soft lines is somewhat of a pattern amongst the photos on this series. These characteristics are indicative of what Pierrou thinks about today’s modern girl- often times, a woman that carries a powerful and tough, but ultimately soft appearance and character.

His inspiration for the series was Andy Warhols ‘Factory’ which was popular in the 60s in New York. Pierrou imagined people of a new factory, free women, feminists, artists that would exhibit their skin, hair, tattoos and words without being ashamed.

(via IGNANT)

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Geometric Wooden Textile Art By Elisa Strozyk

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Elisa Strozyk is a unconventional textile designer. Instead of fabric, she uses wood to construct rugs, carpets, and blankets. While we often think of wood as rigid surface, her work breaks this convention and transforms it into something much cozier.  Elisa’s textile art acts like fabric. They easily conform to a surface and can bunch together, allowing something or someone to be wrapped up in wood.

Each piece is comprised of tiny shapes, variations of triangles and squares. Paired together they make tessellations, or the tiling of shapes to insure there are no gaps between them. Tessellations can be in 2D or in Elisa’s case, 3D. The general idea is that shapes are used to stack and fill space.

These textiles are meant to have us consider a new perspective on material. They challenge our notions of what is possible out of something like wood. Elisa’s textiles can be functional or art object. They can be used as a blanket or on the floor as a rug. But, depending on the design, context, and manipulation of shapes, they can be a sculpture, too.

Elisa gives more insight to her work, writing:

The world around us is becoming increasingly immaterial. We are now used to write emails instead of letters, to pay online, to download music and touch virtual buttons on touch screens. We live in a society of images, a visual culture full of colours, advertisements, television and the internet. There is not much left to feel. Giving importance to surfaces that are desirable to touch can reconnect us with the material world and enhance the emotional value of an object.

“Wooden Textiles” convey a new tactile experience. We are used to experience wood as a hard material; we know the feeling of walking across wooden floors, to touch a wooden tabletop or to feel the bark of a tree. But we usually don’t experience a wooden surface which can be manipulated by touch.

 

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Ben Foster’s Aluminum Geometric Animal Sculptures

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Ben Foster‘s sculptures almost appear to be comptuterized digital renderings at first glance. An industrial and natural artist, Foster creates these life-sized animal sculptures out of enamel-coated aluminum, often placing them in the natural environments that surround his New Zealand home. The sculptural form juxtaposed against the natural landscape has a stunning effect, appearing to be at once disparate and cohesive.

From his website, “Foster’s geometrical rendering is suggestive of the animal’s inherent connection to, and place within, the natural environment. Characteristically, it relies on the interplay of light and shadow and while the subject matter is ostensibly pastoral, the result is dramatic with the sculpture’s silhouette as commanding as the mountainous landscape it resembles.” (via colossal)

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Christian Cuoco

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Christian Cuoco is an illustrator and graphic artist working in New York.  Cuoco states his fondness of “existentialism, books on improvement, and films by Stanley Kubrick.” He currently works with Gojiberry NYC building websites and does freelance graphic design. His mixed media pop art is inspiring to say the least.

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Photographer Captures Beautifully Crafted War Scenes with Human ‘Toy Soldiers’

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Amanda Gorence’s article on Jean-Yves Lemoigne.

“Modern man has become a cog in a very complex society. We live in a society that praises individuality on the one hand and conformity on the other. Man is an elementary particle in the global mass. The Zentai suit fits perfectly with this vision of man as an elementary particle. It makes any individual as uniform as possible. We stop distinguishing between faces, races and genders.

To begin with, the army seemed like a relevant social entity for this series. The army already has a uniform and a color. The individual is subsumed by the larger military corps. This allows me to put these characters into action in nature. I often position myself high above these little men in brightly colored suits. They can make one think of little toy soldiers shot in a hyperrealist panorama.”—Jean-Yves Lemoigne

Jean-Yves Lemoigne is a French commercial photographer. Human Project is his personal work, stemming from a desire to capture man in space. The series consists of two different bodies of work, Human Project / War, featured here, and Human Project / Tourism, in which Lemoigne juxtaposes these same suited men with emblematic places of mass tourism.

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MICHELLE MATSON’s Cut Paper Figures

You may remember Michelle Matson from the second season of Bravo TV’s Work Of Art reality series. Most of the artists work on the show was mild at best but I was pleasantly surprised when I stumbled upon Matson’s website recently while following a never ending path of artist website links.

Created out of thousands of cut pieces of paper, lots of glue, and a dose of comedy, Matson’s grotesque figures are busy shooting chains out of their behinds, having their faces melt off, hoarding animals, and hanging off disco balls in the club during a very complicated dance move. All these works and more can be seen after the jump.

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Felix Deac’s Hyper-Realistic Creature Sculptures

Romanian artist Felix Deac creates hyper-realistic sculptures…sort of.  His pieces covered in human-like skin are replete with moles, veins, blemishes, and hair.  However, their form is anything but familiar.  His sculptures are intentionally amorphic and anthropomorphic at the same time.  In a way Deac encourages the viewer to contemplate the irrational situation in which a creature like this would be a possibility and how it came into existence.

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Somebody’s printing up a storm. Smell it? Hot prints, fresh out of the oven. Mmm. My moms prints used to taste like this.

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