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Vintage L.L. Bean Catalog Covers Recreated As Photograph


Ever since I was a little kid I remember flipping through the L.L. Bean catalog. I never really bought anything from them but I always thought of them as a heritage brand and a classic symbol for Americana. To celebrate their 100th anniversary L.L. Bean tapped famed photographer Randal Ford to recreate their popular  Spring 1933 catalog cover using local residents from Maine’s Acadia National Park. L.L. Bean documented the entire photo shoot in all its outdoorsy glory with a short behind the scenes documentary. Witness how a vintage painting gets transformed into a modern photograph after the jump!

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Anish Kapoor’s Dark Whirlpool Installation Churns Ceaselessly Beneath An Old Movie Theater

Anish Kapoor - Installation Anish Kapoor - Installation Anish Kapoor - Installation

In a place usually left to stillness and silence, black waters churn ceaselessly. Anish Kapoor, a London-based artist known for his sculptural installations using stainless steel, PVC, and other media, has created a whirlpool beneath the wooden floorboards of a former movie theater in San Gimignano, Italy. With a spine-tingling power that seems to suck your gaze to the center of the earth, the vortex pulls endlessly downward into a lightless void. Darkly beautiful and hypnotic, the waters evoke feelings of both admiration and fear. Appealing to the fascination we have for black holes and infinite space, Kapoor has created an existential zone of disturbing liminality, a place which exists between presence and absence, here and there. Speaking of his fascination for spatial emptiness in the press release, Kapoor explains:

“All my life I have reflected and worked on the concept that there is more space than can be seen, that there are void spaces, or, as it were, that there is a vaster horizon. The odd thing about removing content, in making space, is that we, as human beings, find it very hard to deal with the absence of content. It’s the horror vacui. This Platonic concept lies at the origin of the myth of the cave, the one from which humans look towards the outside world. But here there is also a kind of Freudian opposite image, that of the back of the cave, which is the dark and empty back of being. Your greatest poet, Dante, also ventured into a place like that. It is the place of the void, which paradoxically is full – of fear, of darkness. Whether you represent it with a mirror or with a dark form, it is always the ‘back’, the point that attracts my interest and triggers my creativity.” (Source)

By creating this zone of dread — a vacuum of inverted reality that threatens our mortal existences with its apparent soullessness — Kapoor’s whirlpool unveils a special form of significance. The whirlpool is a world “which is paradoxically full,” for instead of beauty and safety, we are confronted with a vital impulse: a void brimming with life-affirming fear that destabilizes our constructions of reality. The whirlpool evades all concrete meaning by always moving, existing beyond our knowledge, troubling us with the notion of infinite absence.

The show ran until May 9th. This whirlpool is an another version of Kapoor’s Descension, which was featured earlier this year at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale. Visit Kapoor’s website and Galleria Continua to learn more. (Via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Iconic Contemporary Sculpture Inspires Exquisite Interiors And Architecture





DXV by American Standard is a landmark product line that represents the company’s storied history spanning 150 years. The collection spans four broad movements: Classic (1880 – 1920), Golden Era (1920 – 1950), Modern (1950 – 1990), and Contemporary (1990 – today).  Each piece in the carefully curated collection harkens back to the era it was inspired by and combines it with modern sensibilities, technology and performance. Although each fixture is inspired by a distinct era, the entire collection has a dialogue and the ability to cross over and create a remix of eras in one space.

The pieces in the Contemporary Movement by DXV capture the ever-evolving spirit of present day design. Each quality crafted fixture, finish, and detail echo the clean lines of contemporary trends in interior design and architecture.  Modern day sculptors like Donald Judd, Tony Cragg and Random International have influenced creatives all around the world with their bold approach to materials, lines and form. Contemporary sculpture lovers can create spaces inspired by their favorites works with pieces from the DXV collection.

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The Art Nouveau Sensibilities of Jugend Magazine


We’re not in the habit of sharing stuff that’s not contemporary here, but sometimes you come along something that shouldn’t be overlooked, as it seems relevant no matter when it was created, and could use a little more attention. Jugendstil, the German Art Nouveau movement, was named after the late nineteenth century literary magazine Jugend, which promoted the aesthetic within its pages and on its covers. If you’re looking for some fresh typography/design/illustration inspiration, check out this online resource, which contains lots of images from and info on the magazine. There’s even some Impressionistic stuff mixed with the Art Nouveau goodness, but it all comes off as really fresh. I wonder what Jugend, which didn’t make it out of World War II and Nazism, would be like if it were around today.

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A Sign Of The Times: Jakub Geltner’s Creepy Installations Made From Surveillance Equipment Are Always Watching You

Jakub Geltner - security installations Jakub Geltner - security installationsJakub Geltner - security installationsJakub Geltner - security installations

The installations, sculptures and street art, of Jakub Geltner is subtle, disconcerting, and very in-sync with the Zeitgeist and hot topic of the moment. The Prague-based artist installs groups, or rather – herds – of security cameras, satellite dishes, and surveillance equipment in different outdoor settings. Drawing attention to the presence of being watched and filmed in some way or another, the groups of equipment is very creepy.

Geltner places the gear in absurd places – screens are tilted to look directly at a brick wall, or to spy on a moss covered rock at the beach. Satellite dishes are clumped together on the side of a church – obviously not much use for anything and cleverly parodies the aesthetic of so many apartment blocks littered with the dishes in our modern day, technology-obsessed cities. The artist explains a bit more about his work:

My project is simply called “Nests” and mimics the random human activity in the urban landscape. I was inspired by the characteristics of several cities on my travels around the world where I often found different unplanned, almost organically placed, elements that interfere with the typical facades of the buildings in specific cities.

Through this project I wanted to point out the extent of these “infections” to show how disruptively absurd as well as interesting the urban space can become. I have been working on these nests since 2011, when I set up the first “Nest 01″ in the city center of Prague. I installed it directly on the waterfront of the Vltava river while I was still studying at the Academy of Fine Arts in Prague. (Source)

So maybe next time you are walking on the street around your city, remember to look up and check out just what, where and how many technological ‘infections’ there are around you…..they may just spread their disease to you…. (Via Bored Panda)

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Zeroing

Zeroing by Andrey Nepomnyasochev makes me think: What if the entire world was a crumpled sheet of paper sitting tightly in someones hand waiting to be torn apart.

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Jean-Francois Fourtou’s Giant people for a tiny world

Jean-Francois Fourtou’s photographs go back and forth between miniature worlds for giant people and tiny people living in giant worlds.

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Danielle Lawrence’s Abstract Paintings Erupt Out Of Their Frame, Commenting on Patriarchal Structures And Its Restraints

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel and Wood

Danielle Lawrence - Enamel, Plastic, and Wood

It is always exciting and refreshing to see traditional art methods used in a whole new way. Artist Danielle Lawrence‘s fresh eye on contemporary art takes the conventional framed painting and transforms it into highly textural and sculptural work, taking it to another level. In her work, the frame is often still present, but the art inside it is spilling out, exploding from the frame that confines it. It is almost as if the paint has a life of its own, trying to escape from the cage and constraint we have given it. Lawrence explains that the frame is a symbol of patriarchal structures and restriction.

Lawrence’s non-representational painting method allows the colors to melt and drip, creating incredible movement in each piece. These colors appear bent, folded, and manipulated, creating organic forms. Each bright, glossy color erupting from each canvas and frame turns the typical two-dimensional painting into a more palpable, three-dimensional piece that reaches out at the viewer. Her artistic journey began while experimenting using trash as subject. Still pulling inspiration from found objects, the artist’s work often includes items from her studio, including plastic bags and bubble wrap. Lawrence’s take on form and material is both chaotic and structured, creating order out of an eclectic range of colors and media. She flawlessly creates a beautifully balanced mixture of classic painting methods with a new, contemporary approach.

She’s an avowed formalist with an eye to the street. Her works are lustrous and abject, smooth and sharp, blunt and sophisticated. While painting is clearly her passion, she makes promiscuous use of other media: sculpture, drawing, photography and video.

-Glen Helfand, ArtForum

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