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Anne De Vries

Anne De Vries
Anne De Vries is interested in “reducing a staged scene into a two dimensional image and then photographing it. The image becomes further removed from a dominant physical presence and allows the focus to shift more to the codes and spells that these tableaus evoke. These images are meant to exploit the visual and iconographic potential of the common world as a language.” Check out “Constructing Virtual Reality” (in collaboration with art group AIDS 3D– there’s something weird with their site right now, we’re not trying to give you guys computer viruses…) where a semblance of a 80’s/90’s cyber world is created by photographic tricks: long exposures and grid made out of strings with black light.

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Cassandra C. Jones

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Carnegie Mellon grad Cassandra C. Jones makes work that embraces the digital photography + social web revolution to the fullest extent. She combs the web for pictures that fit whatever project she may be working on (above, wallpaper made entirely from images of flamingos), many of which end up being amateur digital snapshots uploaded to Flickr or other photo hosts. Taking this found photography, she creates art – sometimes smart, sometimes clever, sometimes thought-provoking compositions.

Cassandra C. Jones was recently featured on BoingBoing Video. The interview, which I highly recommend watching, is after the jump, along with some more images of her work.

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The Smooth And Surreal Illustrations of Ville Savimaa

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The illustrations of Ville Savimaa are smooth.  The soft curves and soft colors combine to   produce dreamy scenes.  He fuses elements of nature, animals, people, and fashion, to complete very complex compositions that are not overly busy.  Savimaa begins his pieces in pencil and completes them digitally.  His clean and fluid style as an illustrator has won him several high profile clients including Adidas, Disney, Nokia, and Sony.

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New work by Brian Willmont

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Brian Willmont has some lovely new futuristic medieval paintings that detail fantastical conquests of ancient and not so ancient allegorical lands.

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Moon Hoon’s Home Library Slide

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If you were similarly a nerd-child, this home library would have been better than any I could conjure.  Architect Moon Hoon designed this extremely family friendly house.  The spaces throughout the house are very versatile with this library being its highlight.  Embedded in the bookshelves is a wooden slide.  Also, the shelves double as tiered seating for the home theater.  Moon Hoon says of the feature:

“The multi-use stair and slide space brings much active energy to the house, not only children, but also grown ups love the slide staircase. An action filled playful house for all ages.” [via]

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teamLab Transforms Paris’ Historic Grand Palais Into A Beautiful, Cascading Waterfall

teamLab -  Universe of Water Particles on the Grand Palais

A Japanese collective of technologists and artists known as teamLab recently used projection mapping technology to transform Paris’ Grand Palais into a virtual waterfall. In a stunning play of shadows and light, “water” cascaded down the columns and across the bodies of the silent, guarding statues. The simulation gave the historic building a haunting, subaquatic appearance, like a structure from the lost city of Atlantis. On their website, teamLab explains how they integrated 3D models of the Grand Palais — effectively turning it into a digital “rock” — with the natural movement of water particles:

“The simulation of the waterfall was created by calculating the movement of water as it was allowed to fall on a 3D model of the Grand Palais in a virtual computer environment. […] [T]he waterfall simulation is [then] projected onto the real Grand Palais.

The water is expressed as continuum of hundreds of thousand of water particles that flow in accordance with how the computer calculates the interaction of the particles. Once an accurate water flow simulation has been constructed, 0.1% of the water particles are selected and lines drawn in relation to them. The waterfall is expressed as the combination of these lines. […].” (Source)

Connecting their artwork to a cultural tradition and spirit, teamLab adds: “The waterfall video art work is created in 3D space and uses what we consider to be the logic structure of spatial recognition of our Japanese Ancestors.”

The Water Particles on the Grand Palais was part of the Art Paris Art Fair 2015, and was shown until March 29th. Two other video projections by Dominic Harris and Mounir Fatmir also used the Grand Palais as a digital canvas, and you can watch these artworks in action here. Check out teamLab’s website for more immersive and technology-infused works, including a floating flower garden and a room of orbs that change color and emit sounds when touched. (Via The Creators Project)

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Nir Arieli’s Photographs Capture The Movements Of Male Dancers

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A self-declared lover of beauty and gentleness Nir Arieli‘s photographs of male dancers combine those passions with great technical skill.  For this series, which he titled “Tension,” Arieli described his role as being a “visual choreographer.”  The portraits  are the outcome of a verbal dialogue between the photographed dancer and Arieli and of the work he says, “I don’t pre-determine the result-insisting on well-planned perfectness-but rather establish a strong understanding, let the dancer improvise and capture his movements.  Afterwards, I experiment with layering various photos on top of each other, searching for intriguing combinations.”  Dependent on coincidence and uncontrollable movements, Arieli trusts the physical intelligence of his subjects.

Arieli began his career as a photographer for the Israeli military.  Perhaps this is where his interest in capturing the physical abilities of the male body emerged. Unusual in their depiction of the male (versus female) form as a source of grace and beauty, the images are striking for their sense of movement.  In his statement Arieli says, “I can’t dance, I can’t in my room, nor in a club, let alone any kind of stage.  Whenever I am forced to try I stumble or freeze or drink enough to disappear.  However, this time, for the first time, I found myself actively involved in dancing-even if by using someone else’s body.”  Indeed, as a viewer, we feel involved with the dancer, as impossible as the postures might be for us.  Arieli wonderfully captured the movement and allowed us to feel a part of it.  (via LensCulture)

 

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Art and Fashion Collide In The Psychedelic Dreamscapes Of Marina Fini

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

Marina Fini - Photography/Design

At the intersection of fashion, photography, film, stagecraft, and design, artist Marina Fini creates hallucinatory, alternative worlds. Based in California, she collaborates with friends and artists alike in the staging of these otherworldly scenes, using colorful costumes and her own handmade, plexiglass jewelry to turn her photographic subjects into ethereal cyber goddesses. When asked how she builds these characters, Fini remarked, “there’s something about transforming someone into someone they wouldn’t normally be … that is, creating an extension of themselves that I see in them.” All of her characters exude a captivating power, like the whimsical and intangible figures seen through a psychedelic dream. By exploring alternative selves in familiar contexts – a convenience store, or the Californian seaside, for example – Fini explores how subjecthood is fluid, and how such creative “shape-shifting” can alter they way we perceive our immediate reality.

While beautiful, there are also darker and more satirical elements in Fini’s work; in her own words, there’s something compelling about “juxtaposing what we associate as innocent with something horrific or insane.” In her short film Tree Temple, for example, a group of forest sprites — their faces eerily obscured by their colorful hair — dance feverishly around an altar made of Apple computers. Shortly after destroying the altar in their frenzy, they fade into mourning and death. As this film exemplifies, integrated throughout Fini’s scenes are emblems of our contemporary cyber culture — the Apple logo, wifi symbol, hand cursor, and so on. Speaking to this, Fini says that the use of such icons “specifically pokes fun at our internet-obsessed culture,” thereby producing a playful — and sometimes dark — cultural critique of our digitized existences.

In addition to her photographs and videos, Fini is well-known for her aforementioned jewelry, as seen on many of the models in these photos. In pursuit of new projects, she has recently announced that she will be phasing out her jewelry, but her Etsy shop will remain open until mid-January 2015. If you enjoy immersive art and playful reconfigurations of reality, check out the surreal worlds she has created on her website and Tumblr pages.

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