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Ted Mcgrath’s Scribbly Illustrations

Ted Mcgrath is an artist and musician currently living in Brooklyn, NY.  His scribbly illustrations have appeared in a myriad of publications including The New York Times, New York Magazine, Bloomberg Business Week, NYLON, The Village Voice, and Bust.

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B/D Best of 2010 – Emma Hack

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Painter and sculptor Emma Hack‘s collection, “Wallpaper,” is a series of meticulously painted models made to blend in with the designs behind them – true wallflowers! Hack must have been incredibly patient when working on canvases that move and breathe; her work is so precise, if you blur your vision, the models effortlessly become part of the wallpaper.

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Glitch Inspired Street Art

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The art of the glitch has made its way off the screen out of the realm of the accidental.  Perhaps it’s the aesthetic source of a new abstraction.  The form has also made its way street art and graffiti.  Polish artist Krzysztof Syruć incorporates explicit glitch stylings and subtler inspiration in much of his work.  This first piece seems to use its background as a source image.  The image is distorted, ‘corrupted’, and reduced to basic values.  Other pieces seem to reference circuitry, code, and even biological systems.

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Video Watch: Kirsten Lepore’s Stop Motion Animation

Due to the horrifying amount of time it takes, stop motion animation is something of a dying art these days. Luckily, though, Kirsten Lepore is out there keeping it alive and keeping it real. I’ve been a huge fan of her work for a while now. If you enjoy animation, colors, laughter, or can at least appreciate someone spending thousands and thousands of sweat and tear filled hours to make something five to ten minutes long for an uncertain audience, then you might just be a fan too. Watch some of Kirsten’s greatest hits after the jump!

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Illustrator John Dombrowski

johnnydombrowskinaturallyviolentJohn Dombrowski has a sharp style that slices through your retina.  I could definitely envision his aesthetic fitting well in a graphic novel.

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Color Shifting Art Uses RGB Lights To Change Scenes

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Italian based artist team, Carnovsky, unveiled their RGB Fabulous Landscapes during Milan Design Week 2013. Their digital fresco’s were printed using an innovative technique by Italian company graphicreport. In plain light the landscapes, figures, architecture and atmospheres vibrate and the images are tangled with one another.

But when red, blue or green light is applied to the digital fresco’s a whole different series of pictures emerge. In the piece Atmospheric N. 1 the sky seems to be in a flux of sunrise, sunset and storm as the lighting changes.

In Landscape N.1 a room that seems to go back into infinity is taken over by a lush green landscape which then gives way to a centuries old battle scene.

Both the technique and the imagery are compelling and together the juxtaposition creates an ethereal and haunting effect. (via)

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Someone Made A Living Replica Of Vincent Van Gogh’s Severed Ear

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We all know the story of Vincent van Gogh’s ear, an organ that the artist is rumored to have severed from his own head in a fit of lovesick madness. For her project Sugababe, the artist Diemut Strebe has recreated the living ear of the legendary Post-Impressionist. Teaming up with scientists and using an advanced 3D printing technique, Strebe constructed the true-to-life organ from a sample of the late artist’s DNA found in an envelope that he had licked in 1883 and live cartilage from the ear of Lieuwe van Gogh, a grandson of the painter’s brother. The replicated ear, now on view at The Center for Art and Media in Karlshruhe in Germany, is kept alive by being suspended in a solution laced with nutrients.

Strebe’s installation includes a microphone into which viewers can speak. The sound is then carried to the ear, which hears speech as a crackling noise that is projected through speakers for all to listen. For the artist, Sugababe is a physical manifestation of Theseus’ paradox, wherein the ancient Greek hero was asked if a ship would remain the same if all its individual parts were replaced with new ones. Here, Strebe asks if this clone of an ear might in fact be considered the same ear worn by van Gogh. Tragically unable to respond the viewers who speak to it, the organ seems startlingly alien. Though it is composed of the same elements as the original ear, it lacks the humanity and the romance we ascribe the artist whose molecular biology it shares.

Given the tragic history of the artist, Strebe’s work carries with it a sense of loss and poignancy. Where the living van Gogh was unappreciated— reviled, even—in his time, here even his tiny organ is preserved with the utmost care, his body transformed into a valuable work of art in and of itself. (via Design Boom and The Daily Beast)

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Guerra de la Paz

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Old discarded clothes guide Miami artists Alain Guerra and Neraldo de la Paz to create works that are fueled by their “silent histories.” After they began to discover their love for using found objects in their work, they became inspired by the trashed clothes they found at a secondhand store near their home. Out of these materials, they’ve constructed bodies, nests, fabulous mounded towers of garments, and whole families of cotton people, eerily alluding to those that wore the clothes when they were new.

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