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Mark Addison Smith Listens To Your Conversations

 

For over two years Mark Addison Smith has been keeping a visual catalogue of strange, funny, awkward, and quirky conversations he’s overheard.  Each day he writes down things he hears and at the end of the day creates simple yet effective text based illustrations based on the one liners.  What started Mr.Smith on this epic project? Here’s what started it all in the artists own words- ” The idea for this on-going series came about in 2008 during an evening walk to the train. A girl approached me in the Chicago Loop and asked me for a cigarette. I don’t smoke. She replied, “ahh, you look like the right type” and ran off. I ran home and illustrated her words, and have been drawing dialogue ever since.”

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Daniel Zvereff’s Stunning Photographs Of The Arctic Come In Unexpected Hues Of Violet,Red And Blue

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Discontinued film stock has become an obsession amongst fine art photographers, and pretty much everyone else (at least the imitation of it even–think instagram filters). New York-based photographer Daniel Zvereff is no exception. In one of his recent series, Introspective,  Zvereff uses some of the last remaining supply of expired Kodak Aerochrome film in 120 format and takes it to the Arctic–a place as endangered as the film itself.

A travel journalist and photographer, Zvereff looks for the picturesque and the mundane- a good mixture of the two brings forth an interesting and stunning collection of photographs from all over the world- including the ones found here, which were taken in very remote parts of the Arctic.

The usage of the expired film showcases brilliantly unusual but beautifully colored mountains, graveyards, and highways in the brief, verdant Arctic summer are stained in otherworldly pinks and purples.

The now discontinued Aerochrome, was originally developed for the military to help them detect camouflage from helicopters: It responds the chlorophyll in plants and reverses green colors into lavenders and magentas and browns into deep blues.

“The Arctic will essentially be the next frontier for mining natural resources, and with a warming climate it’s safe to say it will soon be transformed as we know it, forever, It only seemed appropriate to photograph its incredible natural beauty using a film that is no longer in existence.”

(via FastCompany)

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Teale Coco Designs Empowering Accessories Inspired By Occultism, Fetish, And Human Anatomy

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Lunar Eclipse” catsuit, “Lucifer” fullbody harness, “Starlight” bloomers, and “Lunar” bralette. Photo: Tasha Tylee | Makeup: Brianna Rourke

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blackmass” fullbody harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco - Fashion

“Blk Magic” thigh garter, “Cult” bloomers, and “Widows Peak” crop. Photo: Taygan Bassi

Teale Coco - Fashion

Left: “Lucifer” fullbody harness and “Starlight” bloomers. Right: “Cult” bloomers, “Coven” bralette, and “Demonic Possessions” shoulder harness. Photo: Sean Higgins

Teale Coco is a Melbourne-based designer, photographer, and international model who has crafted her own dark and fascinating brand of handmade accessories. Inspired by occultism, fetish, and human anatomy, Teale’s designs are characterized by powerful statement pieces influenced by occult symbols — such as the pentagram and sign of the triple goddess — in addition to harnesses that mold to the body in provocative ways. As a synthesis of dark themes and alternative culture, Teale’s work is a holistic approach to fashion, one that melds personal identity with empowering aesthetics.

“Fashion is art,” Teale wrote in a statement provided to Beautiful/Decay. “I don’t have boundaries with what I create, and I set no limitations. […] Human anatomy is one of my biggest influences. The shapes, sizes, lumps, bumps, bone, flesh: everything is derived from a natural source — even our technology today was first inspired by the mystery that is nature.” And, referring to how her “Medusa” full leg harness is an evolution of the garter (a time-honored fashion item), she goes on: “I am expanding these traditions and creating something unearthly.”

At the core of most subcultural fashion is a dissenting spirit that seeks expression beyond societal norms and limitations. The same energy drives Teale’s work as she endeavors to create pieces that foster individual empowerment. Following designer Yohji Yamamoto’s perspective on the seemingly paradoxical beauty of black — a “modest and arrogant” “color” that says “‘I don’t bother you, don’t bother me’” — Teale’s versatile pieces are both assertive and romantic, and can be hidden under clothes or displayed over top (Source). Furthermore, the harnesses are gender neutral and made to adapt to all body types, placing no restrictions on who can wear them. “I want people to love themselves, feel good, wear what they want to wear, and not judge themselves,” Teale wrote, explaining how body positivity was important to her project. “It’s not about what other people think about you, it’s how you feel about yourself — and my designs are here to help liberate you.”

Teale Coco the Brand is a passionate project that is destined to go far. In just over a year, after transforming her Etsy store into its own company, Teale’s work has gained an impressive, international following. All of the styling, designing, editing, creative direction, makeup, and social media are currently done by Teale herself, with a team of artisans sewing the designs. Check out the brand’s website, Facebook page, Tumblr, and Instagram to learn more. 

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Jessica Dance Crafts A Turkey You’ll Want To Snuggle With

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

Photo credit: David Sykes

London-based artist Jessica Dance specializes in creating handcrafted models, props, and sets that have a wide-range of commercial appeal clients include Vogue, Vanity Fair, Google, and more). Her work features a lot of conventional, everyday objects reimagined in a delightful, unconventional way. Dance knits food, toothbrushes, and even calculators on her domestic knitting machine, and it’s a playful twist on the real thing.

The knitted pieces are made from wool, and they look like something you’d want to snuggle up with. It’s an odd feeling to want to hug a giant turkey, but that’s the power of fiber arts (or any art, really). We attach associations to materials and sometimes nostalgia prompts us to touch, pet, or squeeze brussel sprouts and meatballs.

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Andy Warhol’s Groundbreaking Computer Art Recovered

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Digitally created visuals are so ubiquitous today, from commercial applications to advertising to contemporary art, that it is hard to remember a time when it was a rudimentary technology used only be a few specialists. Commodore’s “Amiga 1000” changed this, bringing image creation programs into the home, allowing anyone to create original and edited computer images for the first time. To promote the public launch of their groundbreaking model, Commodore asked Andy Warhol to create an image using the software, demonstrating the accessibility of the program, and the possibilities in the hands of a pioneering visual artist. Seen in the following clip of Warhol “painting” Blondie singer Debbie Harry in 1985, it was assumed that Warhol only used the program once, his digital experiment being forgotten. 

It may have stayed that way had it not been for the curiosity and effort of another pioneering artist, Cory Arcangel. Well-known for his early hacked video games and glitched aesthetic that came to be known as Net Art (or Post-Conceptualism), Arcangel was curious if the Prince of Pop Art created any other works on the early digital format. This search led to conversations with curators at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, who owned most of the equipment (discs, hard drives and floppies) that might contain these experiments. Connecting Arcangel to the nearby Carnegie Melon University’s computing club, who have experience in recovery and “retrocomputing”, the combined effort to recover Warhol’s files took three years.

In a more tech-savvy description of the difficult process at Wired.com, Liz Stinson notes, “Because of the disks’ age and fragility, extracting data posed a serious risk. The archiving and viewing process could irreversibly damage the content, but letting the disks slowly degrade was an even worse option.”

The team was eventually able to recover eighteen images (some of which are shown above), among the first digitally made images by an already famous visual artist. Describing the astoundingly original files, Arcangel said, “What’s amazing is that by looking at these images, we can see how quickly Warhol seemed to intuit the essence of what it meant to express oneself, in what then was a brand-new medium: the digital.”

A documentary about the recovery, Trapped: Andy Warhol’s Amiga Experiments, will premiere May 10th at Carnegie Mellon (and will then be viewable at http://nowseethis.org/.), after which many more of the images will probably be released to the public for the first time ever. (via wired)

 

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Alex Cornell Captures The Strange, Rare Sight Of A Flipped Iceberg

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Icebergs, while massive in size, are usually seen in one way – as white objects that stick out of the frigid water. But, in rare situations, they take on a different, more brilliant form. When an iceberg is flipped over, it appears as a gem that cloaks itself in the color of the surrounding water.  Interface designer Alex Cornell happened upon this phenomenon last month as he sailed through the Drake Passage to Antarctica.  He was able to shoot pictures of the iceberg using his Canon 5D Mark II camera.

“We were lucky to see a massive iceberg flip; when this happens, the color is a surreal, alien blue,” he tells PetaPixel. “They don’t flip often, so it was a pretty rare sight to see. It’s hard to tell scale, but this was an epic iceberg.”

It’s often said that 90% of the iceberg itself is below the surface, and this is the cause of it being topsy-turvy. “It was amazing to see the interior. There were air bubbles and flowing water throughout. It looked like an alien artifact.” (Via 123 Inspiration and PetaPixel)

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Michael Clark

 

I’ll be the first to admit that I know absolutely nothing about dance, especially when it comes to ballet. I am, however, a huge Fall fan, which led me to these videos of choreography by Michael Clark, a British dancer who famously shook up the modern dance world by staging avant-garde productions often set to experimental or post-punk music. These clips come from a 1988 ballet called “I Am Curious, Orange” which was scored entirely by The Fall. As far as I can tell, there hasn’t been much proper documentation done of this work, but these YouTube clips, taken from Charles Atlas’ long out of print film Hail the New Puritan will have to suffice.

 

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Behind the Scenes Look At Salvador Dali’s Bizarre Photograph “Voluptuous Death’ (NSFW)

Salvador Dali & Philippe Halsman - Photography

Salvador Dali & Philippe Halsman - PhotographySalvador Dali & Philippe Halsman - Photography

In 1951, surrealist artist Salvador Dali teamed up with photographer Philippe Halsman to create In Voluptas Mors or Voluptuous Death. A black and white photograph, this image is simultaneously strange, complex, and alluring. It features a giant “skull,” a living picture that is made up of seven nude female models that took three hours to arrange and photograph. The final product has the artist standing next to the skull, looking like the ring leader of a circus. And, in many ways, he is.

Additional photos have recently surfaced that reveal some behind-the-scenes moments of In Voluptas Mors. Not only do we see the apparatuses needed to hold the models, but we see how the skull was constructed with bodies. From the looks of it, there was a process of getting one section of the skull situated and balanced. This would repeat until the structure was stable enough to be captured on film.

In Voluptas Mors was not the first time that Dali and Halsman collaborated, nor was it the last. They originally met in 1941 and worked together over the course of 30 years.  All of their efforts were eventually published in a 1954 compendium titled Dali’s Mustache, an homage to the artist’s facial hair. Check out the upcoming exhibition at The Musée de l’Elysée, which runs from January 29 until May 11, 2014 to see these images in person.

(Via Huffington Post and Film’s Not Dead)

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