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Mark McKeague – Twitter Radio


TwitterRadio from Mark McKeague on Vimeo.
 

I wish i had the knowledge to create something as beautiful as this. The project Mark created allows him to tune in to twitter posts in real-time using the analog radio. You can use the knob to scan “stations”, which are different twitter posts. Amazing, amazing, amazing.  He used an arduino board and lot of grey matter at SARc.

 

Also, here is an interesting programmatic response to Mark’s project which integrates twitter and youtube. TwiTV click on the top right black square to flip channels. Graphics are kinda shabby though.

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Détournement: Signs of the Times, a Group Show at Jonathan LeVine

 

Last night,  Jonathan Levine Gallery in Chelsea, NYC opened a group show entitled Détournement : Signs of the Times. The show includes works from some big names including Ron English, Shepard Fairey, Jamie Reid, Steve Powers, and Aiko Nakagawa. “Détournement” refers to the practice of altering the face of public signage to change their respective meanings. From curator Carlo McCormick (editor of PAPER magazine):

Employed brilliantly by the Situationists, whose great philosopher Guy Debord laid out the socio-aesthetic framework for this practice, détournements twist the terms of mimicry in ironic parody using the a semblance of the easily recognizable to dissemble and redirect the literal meaning of signs so as to construe a more honest picture of their deceptive intentions.

A natural response to the lies and coercions we are fed on a daily basis, the détournement has been the reactive impulse of all those who question reality, from the Punks who adopted it in the 1970s through Culture Jammers, Adbusters, contemporary street artists and the winding legacy of protest movements from WTO to Occupy.

More images of works in the show after the jump.

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Daniele Papuli Swirling Bent Paper Installations

Daniele Papuli’s incredible installations and sculptures at first glance seem like a pool of foaming and rippling water but upon closer examination reveal that they are simply bent and cut sheets of delicate paper. Thousands of sheets of paper bend, fold, and move together in unison creating a dialogue between the spaces and places that they are exhibited in. (via my modern met)

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Vered Sivan

Vered Sivan‘s installations combine sculpture and performance but they don’t seem alive — they seem lived in. Her use of synthetic thread and dental floss reads as dusty cobweb thriving in the space. Her crocheted steel wool has been cast on the floor. Sivan’s pieces exist in a state where objects don’t change but surfaces do.

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B/D Is Currently Accepting Interns!

Beautiful/Decay Internship

Do you stay awake at night dreaming of the day when you can interact with artists and designers from around the world? Do you get a warm & fuzzy feeling every time you walk by a bookstore or magazine stand? Have you always wanted to work side by side with the an elite group of creative minds who only use the finest office supplies such as golden staples? Do you enjoy nothing more than resizing and cropping a pile of photographs as tall as a 3 story building? If you answered yes to any of these (or none of these questions) then this just may be the internship for you!

Now that you feel excited about our internship opening read the fine detail after the jump!

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Akira Nagaya’s Intricate Paper Cutouts Look like Drawings Out Of A Sketchbook

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Akira Nagaya is a Japanese artist whose intricate cut-paper creations largely depict the beauty of nature. They are so skillfully done that you might be surprised to learn that Nagaya is self taught in paper-cutting, also known as kirie in Japan. He first discovered this type of art about 30 years while working at a sushi shop. There, he had to learn sasabaran, which is a technique used to create decorations by cutting slices into bamboo leaves. Nagaya found that he was naturally talented and enjoyed the process, too.

These small cut paper pieces fool the eye into thinking that they’re something like energetic pen sketches or decomposing leaves. The precise craft makes them appear as though they’ve been cut by machine, not by hand, because of the incredible, minuscule details.

Although the artist had been creating these pieces for years, it wasn’t until much later that his work was discovered. Eventually, he opened his own restaurant and displayed his kirie on the walls. A local newspaper came to write about the establishment, and while there remarked on his artwork. They encouraged him to show it in galleries, and you can follow Nagaya on Facebook to see his new cutouts. (Via Spoon and Tamago)

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Andrea Berretta

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Andrea Berretta’s design work is just so happy. Even the weird serpent/monster creatures look like something I would want to play charades with. His energetic, hand-drawn type gives his work an inviting atmosphere. Like, after seeing this, I’m totally ready for happy hour.

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Wu-Tang Clan To Produce Single Copy Of Ultra-Expensive, Secret Album To Question Value Of Music

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The Wu-Tang Clan, one of rap’s biggest and most influential acts, recently announced that they plan to release a single, hyper-expensive copy of an unreleased, secretly recorded record, to bring about debates about the current value of music. To heighten the value of their project, the owner will not only own the thirty songs on the album, but also the casing, which Forbes Magazine’s Zack O’Malley Greenburg describes as, “The lustrous container was handcrafted over the course of three months by British-Moroccan artist Yahya, whose works have been commissioned by royal families and business leaders around the world. Soon, it will contain a different sort of art piece: the Wu-Tang Clan’s double-album The Wu – Once Upon A Time In Shaolin, recorded in secret over the past few years.”

Says the de facto leader of the boundary pushing hip-hop group, Robert ‘RZA’ Diggs, “We’re about to sell an album like nobody else sold it before. “We’re about to put out a piece of art like nobody else has done in the history of [modern] music. We’re making a single-sale collector’s item. This is like somebody having the scepter of an Egyptian king.” 

On a site titled ezclziv scluzay (“exclusive-ly”), the RZA explains the concept behind the album, “History demonstrates that great musicians such as Beethoven, Mozart and Bach are held in the same high esteem as figures like Picasso, Michelangelo and Van Gogh. However, the creative output of today’s artists such as The RZA, Kanye West or Dr. Dre, is not valued equally to that of artists like Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst or Jean-Michel Basquiat…Is exclusivity versus mass replication really the 50 million dollar difference between a microphone and a paintbrush? Is contemporary art overvalued in an exclusive market, or are musicians undervalued in a profoundly saturated market?”

Plans have already begun to “tour” the listening party, as well as the one-of-a-kind album itself, at major museums across the world, before it becomes available for purchase. Will this gesture be enough to bring music sharing back to its pre-Napster value? As stated at the end of the site’s Edictum “This album is a piece of contemporary art. The debate starts here…” (via Forbes)

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