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Toru Izumida Creates Digital Collages With Computer Screenshots

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Screen Shot 2014-08-30 at 11.35.13 PM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-30 at 11.51.50 PM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.07.11 AM

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Screen Shot 2014-08-31 at 12.17.04 AM

A screenshot, or screen capture, is a tool that’s existed on computers for a very long time, and it’s an easily accessible modern-day archival method. In just a split second, we can take a snapshot of our desktop or movie screen and save it later use. For Japanese artist Toru Izumida, this simple process is used to create collage-esque artwork.

“I use selections of online media to create unexpected combinations that are finalized into a single screenshot,” says Izumida. “The exact date and signature of the creation is recorded on every work.” We see multiple screens open and contain pictures of textures, people, landscapes, and more. Izumida arranges them, varying the window size before capturing the final product on his Mac. The fractured layouts are then turned into prints, and elevates the ubiquitous tool into the realm of fine art.   (Via Spoon and Tamago)

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The Tiniest Landscapes Painted On Miniature Pieces Of Food

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For the Turkish artist Hasan Kale, the tiniest morsel of food inspires visions of sweeping landscapes. Using his finger as a palate, he adorns almonds, M&Ms, and the most translucent layers of an onion with astonishing renderings of his native Istanbul. Where most landscapes take up entire museum walls, commanding attention with their sheer immensity, Kale’s work does the opposite. In these miraculous works of macro painting, the infinite nature of the earth, sea, and sky collides with the impossibly minuscule, heightening the preciousness of the Turkish terrain.

Here, snack foods become as wondrous as great feats of nature and man. On thin slice of banana, a storm rages, its brushstrokes transforming the very texture of the fruit into that of a saturated canvas. On the inner flesh of an almond, he imagines the legendary baroque architecture of the Nusretiye Mosque. The iconic building becomes vertically stretched as in a romantic masterpiece, extending upwards to conform to the natural shape of the almond. On these tiny surfaces, the grandiosity of the city’s architecture is expressed through the vibrancy of color and the dreamy, sweeping whims of the artist’s brush.

Perhaps the most poignant aspect of Kale’s work is its impermanence. Unlike the great canvases entombed in museums, these paintings will decay, perish, or be lost. The banana will rot into mush; the fragile quail egg might crumble. A stunning mosque might accidentally be eaten. But in the meantime, these imagined landmarks exist for the sake of our wonderment. Take a look. (via Colossal)

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Vik Muniz’ Huge Scrap Metal Animals

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Brazilian artist Vik Muniz created these images of animals using scrap metal.  You can get idea of the huge scale of Muniz’ work by looking at the first image – notice the pile of car doors on the left.  Much of Muniz’ art is an accumulation of what many would consider garbage to create fine art.  He creates huge ‘collages’ from these objects, photographs them, and returns them to their smaller scale.  You may recognize Muniz and his work from the acclaimed documentary Wasteland in which his process was detailed. [via]

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JUCO’s Fashion Photography

JUCO  (JUlia Galdo & COdy Cloud) is a photography duo out of Eagle Rock, CA making some stunning photographs. Drawing inspiration from African big timers Seidou Keita and Malick Sibidé, they’re the best blend of fine art and fashion photography since Steven Meisel. Enjoy!( via )

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Platonov Pavel’s Dark Mystery

Platonov Pavel’s portraits of a figure wearing a ski mask are full of rich psychological mystery and intrigue. They take a basic subject matter and create a complex narrative with just a few elements and well placed use of color.

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Emily Hoxworth’s Narrative Worlds

Let’s hop into the mind of Washington DC based artist, Emily Hoxworth. At the core of each of Emily’s pieces, as she states on her portfolio site, is an interest in biology, but specifically the idea that the core of our biological purpose is to reproduce our genetic material. This greater purpose, Emily explains, is a starting point for her explorations which largely take the form of alternative, narrative, worlds. The imagery is a bizarre mashup of mythology, nature, and medical illustrations. The result – a kind of psychedelic series of landscapes and scenes that are very much alien, yet somehow familiar – I like to speculate that these images are akin to the scenery we might experience upon birth. A kind of visual experience that is forgotten upon arrival. Check out more of Emily’s work after the jump.

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Ryan McGinley – Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere

In his third solo show at Team Gallery in New York, Ryan McGinley continues his exploration of youth. Known for capturing spectacular and adventuresome moments, McGinley shifts his focus in “Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere” to stark, intimate portraits. Photographed in his New York studio over 2 years, the hand-picked subjects are shown bare in black and white portraits.

Everybody Knows This Is Nowhere” opens tonight in New York and runs through April 17th.

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ERWAN FROTIN

 

Erwan Frotin’s STRANGERS series captures the flowers of Hyères (Flora Olbiensis), the dramatic and highly specialized world of plants in the region around the Villa Noailles—known as a birthplace of Surrealism—and pictures them in a fresh and invigorating way with closer ties to portraiture than a biological cataloguing of species His is a contemporary take on the genre of still life, fusing organic and inorganic materials to form unexpected results. In these images, one truly comprehends the flower as the perfect union of form and function.

The flowers of Hyères are magnified and recorded carefully by Frotin’s camera. Only one plant ever occupies the frame, and each individual plant’s colors and shapes are heightened with the use of vividly colored graduated backgrounds that glow and pulse with energy. The recontextualization of the flowers momentarily confounds but then becomes clear to the viewer, evoking a feeling Freud described as “strange strangeness.” Removed from their natural matrix, isolated in an artificial field of color and captured for posterity, Frotin’s flowers are the converse of traditional notions of their ephemeral beauty in nature.

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