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Katie Turner’s Bored Teenagers

 

Katie Turner’s colorful illustrations are a lovingly scribbled cosmos of cute dudes, old action figures, bedroom hangouts, super heroes, and people generally having a good time. 

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Kotama Bouabane

Kotama Bouabane

Toronto-based photographer Kotama Bouabane has an incredibly poignant series called “Melting Words.” The ice letters form typical break-up phrases, with their indelible messages transcending the medium’s own impermanence.

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Photographer Marta Soul Unapologetically Kisses 18 Different Men In Romantic Scenes

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Marta Soul’s alter-ego unapologetically kisses 18 different men in the photography series “Idilios.” The red headed protagonist moves from idealized scene to idealized scene engaging in a single kiss with a different suitor each time. Soul says on her site, “immediate satisfaction is found in the kiss. It is the begin[ning] and end[ing] of the entire narrative scene and it is the iconographic element of the image too.”

It is true that the kiss is the central role of the series. Soul poses the lovers with their back turned towards us, bodies entirely choreographed, masking their expressions. Perfectly dressed and suited, the kiss is the only thing we know about the lovers, aside from the incredible wealth demonstrated by their scenarios. With these gestures, the passion between them is concealed from us and allows us to imagine the story between them.

In some ways, the saturation of colors in these passionately distanced and stylized environments are reminiscent of a 1950’s film. They might provide us with the possibility of Hollywood romance: exquisite clothes and remarkable vistas. But, more aptly, the unidentified lovers offer us a paperback romance experience where we can transfer our own fantasies into a world that does not exist outside a creative director’s imagination.

Marta Soul is a photographer working in Madrid.

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Scott Chasserot Uses Art And Science To Find People’s Ideal Image Of Themselves

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Original Ideal from Scott Chasserot on Vimeo.

In his project Original/Ideal, British photographer Scott Chasserot tries to answer the question “What would we change about ourselves if no one were looking?” Using photography, image manipulation software, and an Emotiv EEG brain scanner, Chasserot’s project attempts to discover each individual’s ideal self-image without having the subject utter a word. It’s an interesting combination of art, science, and perception.

The first step of the process is to remove or reduce accessories and enhancements from the subject being photographed. Makeup is removed, hair is pulled back, clothes are adjusted so as not to appear in the frame—the goal is neutrality. The photograph is taken, then manipulated into 50 versions, each with tweaks to facial features, head shape, coloring, and more. The subjects are then hooked up to the Emotive scanner which records brain activity while they are shown the altered images. The scans are examined for signs of “engagement”—particular mental focus which Chasserot interprets to be a positive reaction. The image that produces the most positive brain reaction is thought to be the subject’s ideal version of his- or herself.

“What do we find instinctively beautiful in the human face, and how does this translate to self-image?”

It’s interesting that Chasserot equates an unvoiced preference to instinct. After all, even though the person’s reaction to his or her images is ungoverned, societal influences, cultural ideals, and pre-existing ideas about attractiveness are all learned, not instinctive.

“The methodology is still in pilot study phase,” Chasserot told The Creators Project. “There is plenty to be improved upon. The ‘Ideal’ image is simply the one with the greatest positive reaction immediately after presentation and that cannot be distinguished from any theoretical, specific ‘ideal self’ reaction.”

In the photos below, the original image is on the left and the chosen “ideal” version on the right.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Trillions

I always knew that nature would always be far superior than technology but now I have a video that illustrates it!

Video by Maya

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Todd Hale’s Grotesque iPad Drawings

Todd Hale lives and works in Virginia. He is producing an ongoing series of vibrant and grotesque illustrations using nothing but his fingers and an iPad. Eyeballs floating in gloomy waters, skulls fused with dripping watermelons, and a deranged clown with a cherry for a nose are a few examples of what can be found in the drawings. It is refreshing to see a series of work that resembles vector illustration and discover that it was created in the age old manner of “Finger Painting”.

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Argentine Photographer Mariela Sancari Creates Fictionalized Portraits Of Her Deceased Father

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Argentine based photographer Mariela Sancari‘s series Moisés, acts as an ode to the traditional type of portrait taken of men in their 70’s, the age her deceased father would have been if he were still alive today. After her father’s death, the artist and her twin sister we denied the chance to see his body. She was never sure if it “was because he committed suicide or because of Jewish religious beliefs or both.” In the artist’s statement, she refers to a concept in thanatology (the study of death and practices associated with it) which asserts that when one does not encounter the dead body of a loved one, the lack of visual association prevents the ability to accept their death. Hence, not having the definitive proof of said death aids denial, one of the most complicated stages of grief. Referring to the Baudrillard quote “photography is our exorcism,” Mariela Sancari uses her photographs to play out the fantasy of her attached denial — she uses her portraits to create a fictionalized version of her father. She states;

“I once read that fiction´s primary task is to favor evolution, forcing us to acknowledge and become the otherness around us. I think fiction can help us depict the endless reservoir of the unconscious, allowing us to represent our desires and fantasies.”

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Tetsuya Ishida

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Like clues in a crime scene, Tetsuya Ishida’s paintings use a million tiny details to tell their story. The note on the table, the eerie playtime carnage–Ishida’s work often speaks of the uncertain union between Man and Machine. But I think the most unsettling thing about his paintings is that the human figures’ reactions range only from complacency to mild concern, as if I re-enacted deadly car accidents with my toys on a daily basis. In a tragic act of irony, Ishida himself was hit and killed by a train in 2005.

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