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The World Largest Calligraphy Graffiti Art Is Located On a Rooftop In Moscow

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What just happened last September 2015 in Moscow is massive. The largest calligraphy artwork was designed, filmed and executed by artist Pokras Lampas. Another masterpiece entering ‘Calligraffiti’. A movement blending calligraphy characters and wide paintings. 

730 liters (193 gallons) of white paint were needed to cover the 1625m2 (2000 yards) rooftop of an old chocolate factory in Moscow. Pokras Lampas and his team manufactured 4 big brooms of 1 meter long each that he used to ‘write’ on the floor. During 2 days, the artist designed and producer Sergey Valyaev filmed the experience. (See the video above) Alternatively showing the talent of Pokras Lampas, the huge surface he used a his canvas and the passion and wonder which transported the young artist. The whole team a.k.a. Smokin’ Heroes, risked the possible rain and the potential delay of the paint delivery coming from another city to achieve the colossal artwork. 

The entire surface of the rooftop is covered in calligraphy in concentric circles in a language ‘dedicated to the moments of inspiration and creativity’. The aesthetic and the style is close to artist Retna’s work which, at a smaller scale, also covers walls. The cursive letters and the urban locations used by artists who calligraphy create a modern approach to a traditional art. Behind the performance, there’s a desire to trigger visual excitement for the eyes.

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Justin Blyth

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Justin Blyth is getting vintage futuristic on you with no apologies. These turbotronic images are a mix of digital, xerox and collage.  He’s showing as part of a group show in Amsterdam in March.

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Joseph Turek Loves The Natural History Museum

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Awesome paintings by Joseph Turek, check out his new website and see the wonders of the human form and nature.

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Monki Style

Loving the look book imagery from fashion label Monki. Great mix of sets and digital illustrations.

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Portraits of Women with Vegetable Weapons

As part of our ongoing partnership with Feature Shoot, Beautiful/Decay is sharing Alison Zavos’ article on Tsuyoshi Ozawa.

Since 2001, Japanese photographer Tsuyoshi Ozawa has been traveling around the world photographing young women holding guns fashioned mainly from vegetables. As part of the process, the ingredients are chosen by Ozawa’s models and make up a hot-pot dish native to their country. After the portrait is completed, the “gun” is disassembled and Ozawa and his model share a meal made up of its parts.

Vegetable Weapon, a collaborative project promoting peace, will be on display at Misa Shin Gallery in Tokyo from September 21-November 2, 2012.

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Camilla Wordie Creates Edible Textiles

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Food art is back from the dead! And you thought that those crazy Fluxus artists from the 60’s were long gone…

Scandinavian artist Camilla Wordie creates textiles out of textures found in our daily eats. Her project is a synthesis of her love for both the culinary world and the arts. Edible textiles extends from Wordie’s other food-related productions (Am I chocolate or not? and Wearing Rice is Nice) which include tableware inspired by grains of rice and tables made of chocolate powder.

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Valero Doval

Valero Doval

Valero Doval takes found images and transforms them into either hilarious or downright creepy collages. The images from “Circus Pets” and “Ghosts” serve as evidence for such a contrast.

While this is just a sampling of his personal work, Doval’s commercial clients have included The New York Times, Timberland, and Panasonic.

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These Delicate Victorian Figurines Have Some Badass Tattoos

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The Victorian doll is a symbol of feminine delicacy and piety, but the Scottish sculptor Jessica Harrison has turned that notion on its head, constructing porcelain figures and painting their flesh with vivid sailor tattoos. Harrison, previously featured here for her graphic and macabre figurines, subtly builds upon contemporary dialogues of sexuality and the female body. Where Victorian women were encouraged to be sexually modest, religious and sober, Harrison’s dolls adopt the visual language associated with drunkenness and sexual freedom on the high seas. Sailors, feared for their rowdy traditions, were thought of as the antithesis of the ideal woman, who was almost always middle class, white, home-bound.

Harrison’s dolls, like many Victorian woman, wear corsets and petticoats of soft, pastel hues; one even modestly holds a fan. But these seemingly coy women obviously have some ruffian pasts. Tattooed on one woman’s pale arms are the names of a dozen conquests: Daisy, Rita, Maria, Eileen. Unlike the figurines treasured by small Victorian children, Harrison’s characters seem to have anachronistically accompanied Sailor Jerry on his boozy pin-up filled adventures. Beside a budding rose sewn into the color of her dress, a lady reveals a pair of flying swallows, an icon that appears frequently in mid-20th century sailor tattoos.

Harrison’s impressive series coyly lays bare the deeply entrenched sexism, racism, and classism of the Victorian era, during which women were not permitted to vote or visit pubs. With their waists cinched and their hair powdered into elaborate updos, these seemingly fragile porcelain figures contain an undeniable grit that transcends all social barriers.

Harrison’s work is currently on view at Galerie LJ in Paris. (via Lost at E Minor and Colossal)

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