Get Social:

This Is What Getting A Tattoo Looks Like In Slow-Motion

8721ca9fdbb3c5caf212b6ff5b6e0d8b

gif_565x362_accf11

de767be5857d86f005f67726ba50a1d9

8721ca9fdbb3c5caf212b6ff5b6e0d8b

The Parisian tattoo artist Gaëtan Le Gargasson, also known as GueT Deep, recently released a seductive and hypnotic slow-motion video of himself tattooing the arm of a woman named Fabrice. Needless to say, the fascinating video immediately went viral, and it has since being posted, it has accrued over 600,000 views. Even today, tattoo art carries a stigma, associated mostly with toughness, roughness, and grit; GueT’s stunning video highlights the more delicate side of the work, documenting the intense precision needed to craft the perfect piece. As the needle pulsates, the artist’s hand effortlessly tames the mechanical beast, breaking it to his will and vision.

Part of what makes this video (and the subsequent gifs, created by Design Boom) so striking is the apparent harmony between the organic body and the mechanical tattoo gun; as the tool ticks and marks the passage of time with unending accuracy, the human flesh bubbles, rises and falls with the ink. Like a heartbeat, each plunge of the needle causes the skin to ripple rhythmically. The piece on which GueT is working figures into these theme effortlessly; it appears to be a design composed of both geometric and natural, organic shapes.

In this slow-motion experience, the tattoo itself matters little; the artwork here is the action of the ink, not the end result. The video is more akin to a dance piece than to a painting. Deeply theatrical and performative, it is simultaneously soothing— mesmerizing, even— and anxiety-inducing. We watch the drama unfold, hoping that the hand does not slip, that everything goes according to plan. Take a look. (via DesignBoom and HuffPost)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Studio Visit: Blickle

A few weeks back I headed over to the studio of painter Alison Blickle. You may remember Alison from a previous post as well as her killer contribution to book 3. Alison recently moved to LA , with a studio down the street from the B/D office so I thought i’d stop by and check out what she’s been up to.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Illustrator Mike Frederiqo Twists Fashion Icons And Designers Into Their Own Logos

Karl Lagerfeld + Chanel

Karl Lagerfeld + Chanel

Marc Jacobs

Marc Jacobs

Burberry

Burberry

Riccardo Tisci + Nike

Riccardo Tisci + Nike

Mike Frederiqo is a 23-year-old Dutch illustrator with a healthy dose of talent and humor. You may have seen his other works circulating the internet, including his combinations of BAPE’s fashion logo with Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans, or his images of Sponge Bob as Coco Chanel, Karl Lagerfeld, Terry Richardson, and more. In his more recent series, he has taken his illustrative interpretations of the fashion world a bit further, utilizing the bodies and faces of high fashion icons and their collaborators to recreate famous logos. Among the images you’ll see Lagerfeld and choice model Cara Delevingne completing exaggerated backbends with elongated arms and legs to form Coco Chanel’s interlocking Cs; elsewhere, editor-in-chief Anna Wintour twists into the name “Vogue” (while holding what appears to be a Starbucks coffee). In an interview with Life and Times, Frederiqo explained his inspiration for the series:

“You see so many illustrators taking those famous logos and making fun of them — almost in a negative way. So, I wanted to do something in a positive way with the logos that were recognizable. And what is more recognizable than the Coco Chanel logo?” (Source)

Based in good humor and playfulness, Frederiqo’s stylish logo recreations have a way of grabbing our attention and making us laugh. Logos are a vital part of a brand’s identity, representing their international, high-ranking status and presence. Frederiqo’s illustrations remind us of the real human beings behind these labels; we recognize the logos (and the significance of their names in the fashion world), but when given faces, they become lighthearted, tangible, and funny. Frederiqo’s works poke fun while also nodding in homage.

Check out Frederiqo’s Facebook page and learn about his work. You can read the interview with Life and Times here. (Via Honestly WTF).

Currently Trending

Bernard Roig’s Sculptures Capture The Destructive Potential Of Light

KONICA MINOLTA DIGITAL CAMERA RoigSculpture9 RoigSculpture2

Bernard Roig’s light sculptures capture a particular strain of ennui. While the idea of light tends to evoke a positive or uplifting feeling, Roig recontextualizes this element as a burden to his sculptures’ human subjects. Sometimes light crushes or imprisons this man, or seems to be a goal that will never be reached. The man is usually sculpted in white, brightening the effect of his subjects’ dissolution. Roig’s work addresses the boundary between the connect/disconnect of our culture’s relationship to light. “Today we are living in an atmosphere saturated with images, but the experience that they produce has a low intensity. Now it is ever more difficult to give meaning to an image. We are subjected to light, a light that dissolves the outlines of things, a white light within which everything fluctuates.”

Currently Trending

Tone Matrix

B/D!
Andre Michelle created this fun and simple sinewave synthesizer triggered by an ordinary 16 step sequencer. Each triggered step causes a force on the underlaying wave-map, which makes it more cute. It sounds great and you can make some rad designs. I made four designs and shot them in sequence with my iPhone QuadCamera App. What can you do?

Currently Trending

Sam Green

Check out Sam Green’s fantastic poster created to raise money for Japan’s relief efforts as well as the rest of his portfolio.

Currently Trending

Sleeping With Color In The New Pantone Hotel

pantone1

pantone2

pantone5

pantone4

Belgium just got a whole lot more colorful with the new Pantone Hotel™ opening in Brussels. As a company, Pantone is all about color, with professional color-matching tools for the graphic arts, apparel, home furnishings and interior design, retail paints in partnership with Fine Paints of Europe, as well as an extensive product line based on their iconic color swatches.

The Pantone Hotel™ merges this world of color with an upscale hospitality experience, creating seven color-palettes for the 59 rooms and suites, plus meeting rooms and a rooftop terrace.

“Impeccably designed by Michel Penneman and Olivier Hannaert, The Pantone Hotel™, Brussels showcases the color of emotion with a distinctive hue on each colorous guest floor. From vivid to subdued, for business or leisure, our unique boutique design hotel perfectly suits your savvy palette and colorful imagination.

From a design perspective, The Pantone Hotel™, Brussels is built on an exceptional use of contrast; a white canvas provides clean space for saturated colors to pop. Guest rooms feature unique photography by esteemed Belgian photographer Victor Levy.”

With a choice of large or extra large rooms, staying at the hotel can give you all the minimalistic color thrill with none of the discarding of inappropriately colored objects that you’d have to do at home. You can even acquire your own piece of the Pantone Universe—the concierge sells products from mugs and cups to iPhone and iPad covers. (Via Fast Co. Design. Photos via Pantone)

Currently Trending

Street Artist “MEGGS” Creates Explosive Murals That Radiate Off The Walls

MEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray PaintMEGGS - Spray Paint

The explosive street art of David Hooke, otherwise known as “MEGGS”, moves in waves of color on walls all over the world. His murals harness an incredible energy and force that radiates off the streets in vivid streaks like flames consuming the building. The Australian artist often uses powerful animals such as tigers, snakes, and lions in his work, creating an incredible composition of strong imagery. His use of diagonal lines and composition just add to the already dramatic atmosphere.

MEGGS pull inspiration from an eclectic variety of different sources such as the natural world and socio-cultural issues. His use of bold color and the occasional loud text included in his murals shows a heavy influence from pop-culture. His technique and experimental technique reflects his determination and excitement in his artistic exploration. MEGGS doesn’t just stick to the traditional spray paint. One of murals in downtown LA also includes a glow in the dark stencil layer that creates an eye-popping affect. This piece, along with other of his murals, is based off of a previously done screen print of MEGGS. You can find his work not just in LA, but also in Hong Kong, London, San Francisco, Paris, and Tokyo.

“His life manifesto is that the ‘journey is the reward’ and his work reflects his eternal search for balance. MEGGS’ emphasis on constant growth and passion for travel is demonstrated by his continual exploration of artistic techniques and mediums.”

Currently Trending