Get Social:

Kevin Francis Gray’s Modern Neoclassicist Sculptures

GraySculpture3 GraySculpture

GraySculpture5

Kevin Francis Gray’s neoclassicist-inspired sculptures are beautifully minimalist. Most of his work is created with leather, bronze, marble or fibreglass resin, depicting a stunning color palette of white, black, grey, brown, and gold. His subject is the human form and much of his work features shrouded figures. Gray attends to the detail and subtlety of the drapery that contain his figures, sometimes with a shocking element. His work exudes a familiarity and universality that is at once haunting and captivating.  His work recently appeared in 2012’s Snow White and the Huntsman as a darker version of the mirror man. Gray was born in Northern Ireland and currently lives in London

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Colorful X-Rays Show The Shocking Intricacies Of The Human Body

1

5

2

12

The photographer Xavier Lucchesi doesn’t use a camera to capture his portraits; instead, he penetrates the human body with an advanced x-ray machine, revealing organs, arteries, and bones. The artist adds color to the medical images, highlighting the intricacies of the human body in electric blues and deep, bloody reds. For Luccesi, the act of seeing is active and passionate; a passing glance is insufficient, and to truly view another truthfully is to dissect and peel away exterior layers.

Lucchesi’s portraits are perhaps those of our deepest human core: when our superficial features are stripped back, a more primal self emerges. Lucchesi’s sitters are laid completely bare; though they might pose or strain, their bodies betray secret inner worlds and open them up to a profound vulnerability. A triptych presents a man in three stages of undress: clothed, then nude, then uncovered and unprotected by skin. As he lays with his arms crossed, the x-ray bears down on him, and he becomes increasingly naked, at the mercy of our eager, inquisitive eyes.

As we reach new levels of intimacy with our own bodies, they reveal themselves like brightly colorful and graphic foreign roadmaps; red blood vessels line the figure like highways, leading to pale geometric bone or grassy green lungs in either direction. Like an intricate maze of machinery or a small, delicate cityscape, the miraculous pieces of the human being—the flesh, the lungs, the ribcage— function autonomously, just beneath the surface of our gaze. Take a look. (via Design Boom)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Lee Jeong Lok’s Glowing Tree Series Gives Off A Palpable Sense Of Spirituality

lee-jeong-lok01 lee-jeong-lok02 lee-jeong-lok05

There is something intanglibly familiar about Korean artist Lee Jeong Lok‘s photoseries “Tree of Life”. Perhaps it is the beautiful, postcard-quality of the surroundings, or that Lee has truly tapped into a cross-cultural metaphor for the spiritual in using an illuminated tree as a subject. Lee has mentioned in previous interviews that he considers himself a deeply religious person, and attempts to give his photographs a palpable sense of spirituality. Says Lee,

“I tried to depict emotions and spiritual imagination in that the sceneries inspired rather than recreated the scenery itself. … Every myth talks about another world that we believe co-exists with the real world we look at and live in. The other world has a powerful presence that we cannot see.” 

Lee, who grew up in the Korean countryside, often depicts an intimate bond with nature in his work. In his Tree of Life photoseries, the photographer admits to using installation, sets, scenes and digital manipulation to create his constructed scenes of illuminated trees in spiritually-emotive surroundings. Lee continues,

But it is very important to me that my end product is photography. I believe there exists another, invisible world within the world we can see with our eyes. If I were to draw an image of this parallel universe, it would become a mere fantastical illustration. However, by using photography the end result is very different; it retains the essence of our experience of reality, while simultaneously conveying a sense of the hidden realm that exists therein.”

Currently Trending

Glitch Inspired Street Art

Krzysztof Syruc Street art6 Krzysztof Syruc Street art7

Krzysztof Syruc Street art3

The art of the glitch has made its way off the screen out of the realm of the accidental.  Perhaps it’s the aesthetic source of a new abstraction.  The form has also made its way street art and graffiti.  Polish artist Krzysztof Syruć incorporates explicit glitch stylings and subtler inspiration in much of his work.  This first piece seems to use its background as a source image.  The image is distorted, ‘corrupted’, and reduced to basic values.  Other pieces seem to reference circuitry, code, and even biological systems.

Currently Trending

David Welch’s Material World

David Welch’s photographs document sculptural assemblages that form pseudo monuments, or totems of consumer goods and debris. The totems speak of accumulation and materiality and encourage debate about consumption, media, class, gender and the ways in which we feel compelled to consume.

Currently Trending

Museum Studio

ms_hma31

Museum Studio is a Stockholm-based design/illustration studio which has done some very cool work for clients like Nike as well as a print publication called Museum Paper.

Currently Trending

Antony Crossfield’s Intertwined Bodies

Photography by artist Antony Crossfield. I love his manipulation of the form of the body, as well as the feeling that each image is a still from a larger narrative.

Currently Trending

Andrés Medina

Most of Andrés Medina‘s photographs are of places and things we might overlook or have forgotten about.

Currently Trending