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Roa’s Massive Street Art Animals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Street artist Roa keeps things large and in charge with his massive animals. Whether it’s dead gators, or skinned rabbits Roa brings the carnage of the wild into the urban streets for all of us to enjoy.

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Olafur Eliasson Installs A River Inside a Danish Museum

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Olafur Eliasson, a well-established Danish/Icelandic artist, has installed an imitation dried riverbed in the Louisiana Museum of Modern Art, Denmark. The artist filled rooms in the gallery with rocks, and created what would be a remnant stream, were it actually a dried river. The museum building has had many additions and renovations, and so the architecture and space is an essential part of the experience, and something obviously important to those with investments in the institution. Olafur states that he is interested in the audience’s presence in the museum and their interaction with the artwork. He wants to emphasize the museum space as a “natural bodily process” (according to the Louisiana website, translated by google). In any case, Eliasson’s installation does a good job of eliminating the sterility of the white wall, and engages the viewers’ senses more deeply.

The idea of the river also relates very closely to any museum. A great museum or gallery will have good flow through the rooms of an exhibition. There is nothing worse than the interruption as you trek back through art you’ve already seen to see the next stage in the show, completely disrupting the narrative. It’s a given that not all exhibitions must be linear in their layout, but the river is a great way to engage with the flow of the space. When it feels like many artists (recently and in the past) have experimented with empty gallery space in the name of radical installation and institutional/spacial critique/awareness, Eliasson has actually managed to make something pleasant and engaging, while remaining questioning as well. (Via De Zeen)

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This Is What Getting A Tattoo Looks Like In Slow-Motion

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The Parisian tattoo artist Gaëtan Le Gargasson, also known as GueT Deep, recently released a seductive and hypnotic slow-motion video of himself tattooing the arm of a woman named Fabrice. Needless to say, the fascinating video immediately went viral, and it has since being posted, it has accrued over 600,000 views. Even today, tattoo art carries a stigma, associated mostly with toughness, roughness, and grit; GueT’s stunning video highlights the more delicate side of the work, documenting the intense precision needed to craft the perfect piece. As the needle pulsates, the artist’s hand effortlessly tames the mechanical beast, breaking it to his will and vision.

Part of what makes this video (and the subsequent gifs, created by Design Boom) so striking is the apparent harmony between the organic body and the mechanical tattoo gun; as the tool ticks and marks the passage of time with unending accuracy, the human flesh bubbles, rises and falls with the ink. Like a heartbeat, each plunge of the needle causes the skin to ripple rhythmically. The piece on which GueT is working figures into these theme effortlessly; it appears to be a design composed of both geometric and natural, organic shapes.

In this slow-motion experience, the tattoo itself matters little; the artwork here is the action of the ink, not the end result. The video is more akin to a dance piece than to a painting. Deeply theatrical and performative, it is simultaneously soothing— mesmerizing, even— and anxiety-inducing. We watch the drama unfold, hoping that the hand does not slip, that everything goes according to plan. Take a look. (via DesignBoom and HuffPost)

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Shane McAdams’ Ballpoint Pen Paintings

Shane McAdams abstract and landscape paintings are created with a mix of acrylic paint, resin, and your average ballpoint pen ink cartridges. McAdams takes ink from the pen cartridges and pours them onto the canvas surface, blowing on the ink to create the streaks of color. But the experimental nature of his works doesn’t stop there. He then subjects his works to the powerful lights of a tanning salon which cause a chemical reaction to the pen ink which then creates the tie dyed streaked effect.The result is a world unique to McAdams where the natural and the artificial collide to create spectacular visions of a utopian and hyper colored future.

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FOLLOW BEAUTIFUL/DECAY ON TWITTER!

 

We say all sorts of witty things on Twitter that we never mention on this ol’ blog. So follow us and banter back and forth with us about all sorts of art, design, and pretty much any other random thought that just might pop into your mind.

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Beautiful/Decay & Insight Sample Sale Wrap Up!

Thanks to everyone that came out to the Beautiful/Decay & Insight 51 sample sale on Friday and Saturday. Both days were filled with eager shoppers who were anxious to get  a good deal and hang with us for two sun drenched california days. Here are some highlights …

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Everyone loves a good sample sale where one can find those rare one off samples that you can’t get in stores. Apparently Cousin It got wind of it and came through to find the perfect surfin safari outfit.

 

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David Clarke

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David Clarke brings on a whole new meaning to metal work. He is known as Britain’s very own groundbreaking silversmith. Master of his craft, he has a way of transforming domestic household items into intelligent and engaging pieces of art. Clarke’s work uses traditional silversmith techniques and takes it to a whole new extreme. His willingness to experiment sets his work apart from anyone else.

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Monster Trucks!

 
 

Artist Keith Loutit combined two techniques – tilt-shift and time-lapse photography – to create a “dreamy” impression of the monster trucks rally in Brisbane, Australia. In tilt-shift photography, objects are made to appear small and toylike by altering the camera’s lens to narrow the image’s depth of field – the portion of a scene that appears sharp. By running together 15,000 of these still photos – taken over three hours at the event in November – he created a magical time-lapse animation that has earned plaudits across the web. The self-taught artist’s videos, including footage of swimmers at Bondi Beach in Sydney produced using a similar technique, have attracted huge numbers of views on video-sharing websites such as Vimeo. 

Read the rest of the article in The Telegraph

Thanks to Mark Schoening for the link.

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