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Sleeping With Color In The New Pantone Hotel

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Belgium just got a whole lot more colorful with the new Pantone Hotel™ opening in Brussels. As a company, Pantone is all about color, with professional color-matching tools for the graphic arts, apparel, home furnishings and interior design, retail paints in partnership with Fine Paints of Europe, as well as an extensive product line based on their iconic color swatches.

The Pantone Hotel™ merges this world of color with an upscale hospitality experience, creating seven color-palettes for the 59 rooms and suites, plus meeting rooms and a rooftop terrace.

“Impeccably designed by Michel Penneman and Olivier Hannaert, The Pantone Hotel™, Brussels showcases the color of emotion with a distinctive hue on each colorous guest floor. From vivid to subdued, for business or leisure, our unique boutique design hotel perfectly suits your savvy palette and colorful imagination.

From a design perspective, The Pantone Hotel™, Brussels is built on an exceptional use of contrast; a white canvas provides clean space for saturated colors to pop. Guest rooms feature unique photography by esteemed Belgian photographer Victor Levy.”

With a choice of large or extra large rooms, staying at the hotel can give you all the minimalistic color thrill with none of the discarding of inappropriately colored objects that you’d have to do at home. You can even acquire your own piece of the Pantone Universe—the concierge sells products from mugs and cups to iPhone and iPad covers. (Via Fast Co. Design. Photos via Pantone)

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Artist Duo Write And Draw Naughty Things All Over Your Grandmother’s Fine China

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Kris Aaron and Andy Walker are slightly modifying the purpose of fine China dishes. It’s now decorated with messages and gay illustrations. “Shit again”, “Cock monster”, “I’m going to fuck you” and pornographic images are hand drawn onto plates and kitsch ceramic ornaments. They either paint slogans or sexual images on small objets such as a tiger or a swan or desert plates. The couple just wanted to check “how cute it would be if they were more gay.” 

All the pieces in the Pansy Ass ceramics series are one of a kind. Already collectors of similar items, they redoubled their research in thrift shops and vintage flea markets to find the perfect antique China dishes for their collection. Their intention was to accentuate the kitsch side of plates and objects. “For instance, we have this swan that’s the gayest thing I’ve ever seen,” Aaron says, “and we thought it’d be funny if we painted ‘masc’ (like masculine) on it.” The result is a weird combination of classic patterns and graphic scenarios.

Ideally, the artists would want their embellished dishes to be displayed at Macy’s. From porno chic to porno kitsch there could a part of the market interested in inviting their grandmother to a fancy cucumber sandwich tea party. (via Lost At E Minor).

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Ultrasonic Exhibition Preview: 7 Artist Interviews!

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Mark Moore Gallery will open “Ultrasonic V: It’s Only Natural,” its fifth annual survey of emerging artists, Saturday, September 11 from 5-7. The exhibition will be on view until October 16. The exhibition assesses our fascination with self-contextualization, namely through means of archive, taxonomy and cognition.

To celebrate this collection of not-to-be missed talent, Beautiful/Decay went behind the scenes to give you a sneak peek at all of the participating artists. We’ve included a selection of works, as well as interviews surveying each artist’s aesthetic, advice for other creatives, inspiration and more.

Read on to find out about: Dave Dean’s paintings, typifying concepts of the indigenous and “otherness” in the face of societal development; Carrie Moyer’s fantastic acrylic and glitter canvases; Colin Roberts’ delicate sculptures and graphite drawings that oscillate between the sub/conscious; Dani Tull’s hilariously metaphysical wax compositions; Andrew Guenther’s installations that denote our need for “cultural repositories”; Brion Nuda Rosch’s found art collages; and David Rathman’s sparse, yet introspective watercolors.

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Escif’s Storybook Street Art

Spanish street artist Escif paints short vignettes of bizarre happenings, surreal situations, and humorous moments. Drawn in a flat graphic style that would lend itself well to story book illustrations, Escif’s narratives embrace the unpredictable, free, dark, wild, and nebulous passerby’s on the street and transplants their stories on city walls.

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Toshihiko Mitsuya Sculpts Epic War Scenes And Mythical Creatures Out Of Aluminum Foil

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Toshihiko Mitsuya is artist who undoubtedly proves that it’s not the quality of materials that creates great art—it’s the way those materials are used. Mitsuya’s medium of choice is aluminum foil, which he cuts, shreds, and folds into astounding representations of medieval battles, mythical creatures, and undead warriors. Taking advantage of the foil’s malleability and reflective surface, the armor and weaponry look deadly; conversely, it also has been manipulated to convey the softness of feathers and hair. Mitsuya has brought to life an everyday, ordinary material that is often viewed as trash. In some of his installations, he has created epic battle scenes in ordinary rooms, so lifelike that you can almost hear the crash of miniature weapons. The foil, while appearing deceivingly formidable, represents the fragility of life.

In September of last year, Mitsuya participated in an exhibition at Studio Picknick in Berlin. Titled The Aluminum Garden, the show involved rooms full of plants made out of aluminum foil; Mitsuya turned a material that was born in a factory back into the semblance of an earthly organism. You can read more about the exhibition here, and learn more about Mitsuya on his website. (Via Booooooom)

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Lisa NIlsson’s Internal Body Landscapes Made out of Paper

Lisa Nilsson’s works renders the densely squished and lovely internal landscape of the human body in cross sections. Her materials are Japanese mulberry paper and the gilded edges of old books. They are constructed by a technique of rolling and shaping narrow strips of paper called quilling or paper filigree. Quilling was first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks who made artistic use of the gilded edges of worn out bibles, and later by 18th century ladies who made artistic use of lots of free time.

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Aleksandra Rdest

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Richly pigmented work from Canadian Aleksandra Rdest. Her organic paintings are inspired by “sound waves, clouds, particles and cells on a microscopic level. The point of departure for these works is growth and decay; cellular division and multiplication, weather patterns biological colonization. My love affair with colour gives rise to these paintings which are created by richly layering veils of paint to form a deep surface.” Find Aleksandra’s work at Newzones in Calgary, and Sopa Fine Arts in BC.

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alice anderson Monumental Installations Made Of Doll Hair

Alice Anderson’s giant installations created out thousands of feet of red colored doll hair are a thing of wonder. Selected for its relationship to her own bright red hair, Anderson selected the material to refer to her childhood where she invented rituals based around her hair to calm her anxieties when left home alone. Draped over buildings, walls, and every imaginable surface, Anderson’s work is just as much about reinterpreting an everyday material as it is about coming to terms with the ghosts of her youth. (via)

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