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Amanda Boe’s Poetic Photos Of The In-Between

Amanda Boe Amanda Boe Amanda Boe

Reveling in the small, quiet corners of everyday life, Bay Area photographer Amanda Boe explores themes of isolation, curiosity and mise-en-scene in her strange, stunning work. When looking through images from her series Here and There, it’s easy to let your mind wander into each frame, gently prompted to think about time, place, and what it feels like to be “passing through.” The crisp simplicity of her work is charged with her natural sensibilities as a curious, highly-engaged observer—collecting visual treats as she moves through the world. Boe investigates the places in-between the larger moments of life, and reports back with work that is meditative, personal and poetic.

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Claire Harlan’s Isolated Spaces

There is an arresting sense of isolation in the photographs of Claire Harlan regardless of whether she’s photographing a desolate desert or the streets of Los Angeles.

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Monika Horčicová’s Symbolic Wheel Of Life Created Out Of Marching Skeleton Legs

Monika Horčicová - Sculpture 1Monika Horčicová - Sculpture 2Monika Horčicová - Sculpture 3Monika Horčicová - Sculpture 17

The wheel of life represented by 29 walking skeleton legs and feet. Monika Horčicová is a Czech artist who uses 3D printing to come up with the base of her sculptures. The legs are made out of plaster composite, molded and then casted into polyurethane resin. The legs are then assembled into one piece.

Symbolists, Buddhists and probably many more cultures and art movements have been using the wheel of life. It is the representation of the cycle of life and death. Usually depicted next to the Lord of Death; the wheel turns under his will. Birth and suffering, joy and sadness, alternatively march together. Thus, each of us has the liberty to interpret the meaning of life through the wheel. In this case, Monika Horčicová chooses to emphasize its morbid features.

By using skeletons, she takes a stand, and doesn’t give us the choice but to picture life as inevitably dark and painful. The direction, clockwise or counterclockwise, is important when looking at a wheel of life. Usually we are not given the choice but to visualize it going clockwise. Here, the artist has not set the orientation. As we move around the sculpture, we are free to give it our own meaning.
Although death is predominantly present, we can choose to imagine the course of life going backwards. Our experiences and our knowledge as we move forward, are what make our inner self grow; allowing us to encounter the possibility of an indefinite renewal. (via Empty Kingdom).

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Jonathan Andrew’s WW2 Bunkers

Jonathan Andrew‘s minimal photos of World War 2 bunkers are beautiful and disturbing all at once. These utilitarian structures meant to protect soldiers are reminders of both the horror of war and the innovation and advances in technology that conflicts bring on.

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B/D Biannual Subscription Sale! Only 3 Days Left!

There’s only 3 days left until we ship out Beautiful/Decay Book:7!  To celebrate the occasion we are offering a discounted subscription rate to you our loyal readers. We only discount our subscriptions twice a year so if you’ve been putting off getting that subscription now is the time to do it.

Enter in discount code discountdecaysub during your check out and receive $6.00 off a one year subscription! This deal will only be good for until this monday at midnight PST (12/5/2011). So act now or get stuck paying full price!

 

 

 

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Overunder Wheatpastes Graffiti Or Does he Graffiti Wheatpastes?

At first glance I thought these clever byomorphic and hybrid characters by Overunder were painted directly on the wall but upon closer inspection I realized that these pieces were painted in the artists studio with spray paint on paper and then cut out as giant posters. Although this isn’t a completely unique idea Overunder does a great job of creating a Trompe-l’œil effect with this technique giving his pieces a spontaneous feel while still being labored over and well planned in the comfort of his studio. I’ve posted some images of his work in a gallery setting after the jump so you can see how they are cut.

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Taizo Yamamoto’s Drawings Of Homeless Shopping Carts

Taizo Yamamoto‘s shopping carts are familiar images we’ve all seen before. Crammed into  alleyways or left abandoned in the streets, these shopping carts are part of the scenery of a city. Yamamoto uses graphite and colored pencils to illustrate the carts in great detail, highlighting their contents and the strange collections contained within. By choosing to exclude the people who use these carts, Yamamato is bringing all the focus to the carts themselves. There’s a sense of an anthropological study here, like these carts and the collections they contain are specimen meant to be studied.

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Antonio Paucar’s Figurative Installations Made From Dead Flies

 

The installations of Peruvian artist Antonio Paucar utilize a rather uncommon material: dead flies.  By suspending dead flies from nylon string as well as meticulously placing them on the ground Paucaur painstakingly builds each pieces.  The swarm of flies loosely forms the image of a human figure.  The hazy form created by the collective flies imply the memory of a person, particularly in relation to the space it inhabitants.  Further, the flies seem to suggest the idea of death or decay.  The last four photos are taken from a piece installed in Germany’s Sacrow palace, a building dating back to the 17th century.  The grounds had been inhabited by Prussian aristocrats, high ranking Nazi officials, as well as communist secret police.

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