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Studio Orta

studio-ortaFrom February-March 2007, the artists installed ‘Antarctic Village’ in Antarctica, travelling from Buenos Aires aboard the Hercules KC130 flight on an incredible journey. Taking place during the Austral summer, the ephemeral installation coincided with the last of the scientific expeditions before the winter months, before the ice mass becomes too thick to traverse. Aided by the logistical crew and scientists stationed at the Marambio Antarctic Base situated on the Seymour-Marambio Island, (64°14’S 56°37’W), Jorge Orta scouted the continent by helicopter, searching for different locations for the temporary encampment of their 50 dome-shaped dwellings. Antarctic Village is a symbol of the plight of those struggling to transverse borders and to gain the freedom of movement necessary to escape political and social conflict. Dotted along the ice, the tents formed a settlement reminiscent of the images of refugee camps we see so often reported about on our television screens and newspapers. Physically the installation Antarctic Village is emblematic of Ortas’ body of work, composed of what could be termed modular architecture and reflecting qualities of nomadic shelters and campsites.

The dwellings themselves are hand stitched together by a traditional tent maker with sections of flags from countries around the world, along with extensions of clothes and gloves, symbolising the multiplicity and diversity of people. Here the arm of face-less white-collar worker’s shirt hangs, there the sleeve of a children’s sweater. Together the flags and dissected clothes emblazoned with silkscreen motifs referencing the UN Declaration for Human Rights make for a physical embodiment of a ‘Global Village’.

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Michael C. Hsiung

831_1235762554Being an only child I’ve always been jealous of talented siblings who can team up to take over the world. So it is with great saddness and extreme envy that I post the work of the talented Michael C. Hsiung, brother of Pearl C. Hsiung who graced the pages of  Issue: V with her brilliantly disgusting yet pretty paintings.

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Ivonne Dippmann

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Ivonne Dippmann’s unflattering, raw, and distorted drawings of hefty men in disguises is not what one would describe as “gorgeous.” But it is, maybe not right off the bat, but the obvious attention to the design and detail of shape, texture, and mark-making pulls these into one heck of a killer style of drawing.

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Future Perfect Honorable Mentions (Day 1)

Back in March B/D teamed up with Toyota Prius to bring you the Future Perfect Project.  Due to certain circumstances beyond our control we couldn’t consider submissions from international artists. However that didn’t stop hundreds of loyal international B/D readers to send in work. We figured that the only honorable way to approach the situation would be to feature all of these artists day by day in a short series. For day numero uno we bring to you Tom Dorkin, a 21 year old illustrator from London who is quite creative when it comes to showing off the natural detail in decay. Maybe the only way our future will be perfect is if we realize our commonality in being decaying mammals and that we must seize the day rather than waste away.

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The Miaz Brothers’ Blurry Painting Portraits

When you first look at the paintings by the Miaz brothers, it doesn’t seem like there is much to see. A blurry collection of colors forming an incoherent image. Everything seems far away and out of focus. But something draws you to look closer, perhaps the fact that you can’t immediately comprehend the paintings when you see them. Their lack of detail demands additional attention, and you find yourself scanning them again and again as you put together the larger picture. Colors and patterns begin to stand out, and details slowly emerge. That demand for closer inspection draws you in, and makes you closely examine a painting, that at first glance, seems almost empty.

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Your Spectacular Outdoor Photography Could Win You $15,000!

Weather Channel photo contestWeather Channel photo contest Weather Channel photo contest Weather Channel photo contestThe Weather Channel and Toyota have come together once again for their second annual photo contest to find the most beautiful, provocative, and jaw dropping photographs in their “It’s Amazing Out There” competition. Both amateur and professional photographers are invited to submit their most spectacular images that best depict the wonder, impact, and beauty of mother nature.

The Weather Channel recognizes that “weather” is so much more than the forecast or even weather elements. With that in mind they are asking talented photographers (that’s you!) from all over the US to submit works that fall under the categories of nature, adventure and/or the elements. The first prize is a whopping $15,000 with a second prize of $5,000, and third prize of $1,000. That’s a lot of lenses and photo paper so don’t pass up this opportunity to share your work with the world and win some much deserved money for your artistic efforts.

The deadline for the “It’s Amazing Out There” contest is July 16th at noon ET.  Read the complete rules HERE And enter your photograph HERE.

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Julia Sonmi Heglund

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Visual artist Sonmi Heglund revisits pop-culture creatures of the past and presents many new characters and stories of her own, in an intricate and graphic illustrative style. Dracula, Jiminy-Cricket, and weeping eyes… oh my!

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Amanda Burnham’s Fractured Installations Of An American City

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When artist Amanda Burnham first moved to Baltimore, Maryland, she didn’t know anyone. So, she spent a lot of time in her 7th floor apartment that had interesting views of the city. The time spent observing and recording her surroundings later informed her temporary, site-specific installations that are a patchwork representation of Baltimore. Burnham draws and paints street signs, fire hydrants, architecture, and store fronts, piecing them together in a manner that’s fractured yet cohesive. Taking elements of a neighborhood (or neighborhoods), she fashions her own view of the city, creating work large enough for a viewer to walk around and between. In an interview with Dwanye Butcher of Visual Baltimore, Burnham explains why she chooses to work this way (and why she reuses paper and boxes):

The idea of things being layered and pieced together is important to me. I see this city, and really all cities, as these giant ad-hoc organisms – collectively authored, chop-a-bloc, joints exposed – an ongoing melange of edits, adjustments, negotiations. I hope to suggest that with the deliberately collage-y, visually dense, maximalist aesthetic of my drawings.  I also love paper and what it does when treated as an object – the shadows it casts, the way tears and cuts are line. Most of the paper I use is really cheap stuff – low grade drawing paper that comes in rolls, kraft paper, packing materials. Boxes. That’s important because I’m not rich, but also because I see it as conceptually significant – resourcefulness is an ethic I sometimes see evidenced in the forms of the city, and it’s one I really respond to.

Burnham not only takes the outdoors indoors, but creates a whole new environment in a matter of a few days to a week. Lighting, astro turf, and electrical tape craft an ambience that’s unique to the city.

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