Get Social:

Bus Stop Made From 100,000 LEGO Bricks Pops Up In London To Celebrate The Year Of The Bus

bus bus street art brick bus street art bus stop

With Britain celebrating the Year Of The Bus (#YOTB), three major companies teamed up to build an amazing life-sized LEGO bus stop on the Regent Street in London. Constructed from over 100,000 LEGO bricks, it features even the most intricate details and has a personal hashtag (#LEGOBusStop).

Opened to public just a few days ago, this bus stop already received huge attention from city’s visitors and locals. On Sunday, it served as a checkpoint for vintage bus parade and showcased models from the 1820’s up to the most modern Routemasters. According to the TfL spokesman, the bus stop was meant to stay in place until July 15th but the term may be prolonged.

“Many thousands of people pass along Regent Street each day and we hope the new shelter will bring a smile to the face of even a hardened commuter”,–Leon Daniels, TfL’s Managing Director of Surface Transport.

The LEGO bus stop project was initiated by Transport for London and developed together with LEGO and Trueform, a company that specializes in public transport hardware. It took around two weeks to build and appears on the outside of a legendary toy store Hamley’s.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Lord Of The Rings Fan Re-Creates Bilbo Baggins’ Hobbit House Out Of 2,600 Balloons!

Lord Of The Rings’ fans have always been a bit eccentric but Utah based balloon artist Jeremy Telford has raised the bar by more than a few notches by constructing Bilbo Baggins’ hobbit house entirely out of balloons. The Tolkien super fan spent over 40 hours with swollen fingers creating the life size structure right in the middle of his living room using only a hand held balloon pump, his imagination, and a spiffy green vest to hold the balloons in. The structure comes complete with a fireplace filled with wood and flames, ornate chandelier, ceiling beams and closet doors that open and close! Watch a time lapse video after the jump of Telford in action as he creates the ultimate nerd shrine to Lord Of The Rings. (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Harrison Roberts Visits B/D

DSCN1995Say hello to Harrison Roberts. Harrison stopped by our offices to drop off his work for the upcoming Art Works Every Time exhibit. He was a bit flushed and out of breath – having lugged his pieces, many of them quite large, up several flights of stairs on a muggy Los Angeles afternoon – and then we made him pose for our camera! I’ve been admiring his collection of 2 and 3-dimensional works. They speak so boldly from afar but I can’t help inspecting them from very close in order to take in all the unexpected details; his concoctions speak equally well – albeit with altered voices – from both perspectives. You can see Harrison’s complete collection next Saturday, June 12th, at the Art Works Every Time opening reception at L.A.’s Synchronicity Gallery. Thanks Harrison!

Currently Trending

Classical Sculptures Reimagined As Street Art

Classical Sculptures street art

Classical Sculptures street art  Classical Sculptures street art HOPE_05

Athens, Greece-based artist HOPE is well-known for his use of large-format collaged pieces, both in the streets and in the gallery. Taking the ruins of the classical sculptures of his homeland, HOPE returns these images to decaying buildings, using large stickers applied outdoors. Though he found his fame in the streets of Athens, the mixed-media artist has been transitioning towards exhibiting his works more indoors, both in decrepit public spaces and in white-walled galleries. Describing his style of using and remixing classical and recognizable sculpture, HOPE says, “My works are marked by mythology. They are sculptural images inspired from the past with a new aesthetic rule.”

HOPE continues, “What interests me about street art and public art, in general, is that it can exist as a forum/platform for dialogue. We live and think within the public space. When you place an artwork in the public domain, you’re interacting with the public. This makes you think about the public order. You’re given the opportunity to express your opinion politically and sociologically through a work, the longevity of which is determined according to the public opinion… But the main reason I got involved in street art was the feeling that I was creating an anti-monument, a new kind of creative model which escapes private places. Sometimes, when public art is effective, it can even change the world.” (via artnau and yatzer)

Currently Trending

Jonathan Monaghan Renders A Utopian Universe Modeled After A Faberge Egg

jonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photography

For over one hundred years the Faberge egg has been a symbol of wealth, status and beauty. Originally created by Carl Faberge for the Russian Tsars to gift their wives during easter time, its exquisite makeup consisted of the finest jewels, metals and motifs. Its structure depicted scenes of historical and domestic value which the Russian Royal family deemed significant. Over time, these precious objects d’art became unusual records of lavish beauty which consisted of coronation scenes and portraits of kings and queens.

Incorporating the same idea with a modern twist, artist Jonathan Monaghan creates Faberge eggs in a digital format which combine pop culture, human anatomy, luxury items and historical architecture. His vision produces an egg-shaped utopia which comments both conceptually and sociologically on world tradition. Through a kaleidoscopic view of the past, present and future, his narrative breaks down what we deem important and questions our desire for material wealth.  In one piece, the egg is replaced with Starbucks logos instead of jewels. It metaphors the brand we hold near and dear to us today and creates an egg-shaped universe that speaks to the viewer with a utopian ideal that places worth on things opposed to ideas and individuals.
Only fifty of the original Faberge ‘Imperial’ eggs were made and only forty-seven survive. The first Faberge heirloom, known as the Hen Egg was a replica of an actual white egg that disclosed a solid gold yolk inside. This in turn stored a golden hen which further possessed a tiny diamond replica of the Imperial Crown from which a ruby egg pendant hung. Unfortunately, these last two surprises were lost.
jonathan monaghan photography
jonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photographyjonathan monaghan photography

Currently Trending

David Samuel Stern Physically Weaves Portraits Together, Showing Two Different Sides Of His Subjects

David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait David Samuel Stern - Woven Photographic Portrait

Brooklyn based artist David Samuel Stern takes still photographs, and fuses them together so that they appear to be in motion. He begins by taking two portraits of the same person, and then carefully and meticulously cuts them apart before physically weaving them back into one another. This not only creates amazing texture and an interesting checkered pattern, but combines physical features until the composition.

become a hybrid of two faces. With a light and airy palette, these breathtaking photographic prints become ghosts of themselves, two versions or the same person. Two different emotions are often present, creating an interesting dichotomy of the internal character. We are seeing two sides of the subjects, as the weaving alters and skews our perspective. Stern’s highly original technique abstracts the portraits so that they seem to be caught in mid motion. Both original images become blurred after they are combines by weaving. The once crisp photographic prints are transformed by their alteration, creating a painterly atmosphere. David Samuel Stern’s method is simple yet powerful, exposing two sides of each of his subjects. However, the abstraction present in his work also hides elements and details of the portraits as well.

You can see David Samuel Stern’s mesmerizing, photographic work on view at the BAM Harvey Theater in New York City from September 16 through December 20th.

Currently Trending

Delicate X-Ray Photographs Offer A Touchingly Intimate Glimpse Into The Everyday

hughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0000_layer_comp_1.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0015_layer_comp_16.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscalehughturvey_655_london_oxo_exhibition_2014_smithsonian_0017_layer_comp_18.jpg__1072x0_q85_upscaleHugh Turvey X-Ray images

The artist Hugh Turvey lives his life in x-ray vision; since her began creating his vivid, colored x-ray photographs, titled xograms, he views the world and its objects as something to be dissected, unveiled, and understood. Turvey’s strange x-rays are made thusly: he begins by positioning his subjects on light-sensitive paper, then overlays them with photographs and adds color so as to enhance depth.

X-ray technology, which we so often associated with sterile medicine, healthcare, and the danger of internal injury, finds an oddly tender home in Turvey’s work. Dense objects become visual synecdoches, stand-ins for living subjects; in one image, a coat becomes personified, its zippers, seams, and wrinkles suggesting human posture. Femme Fatale pictures the artist’s wife’s foot: contorted, stressed, delicate.

When placed alongside these relatively personal images, x-rays of suitcases, phones, and first-aid kits no longer retain the cold, effective objectivity we are accustomed to seeing during TSA screenings and the like. Instead, we are offered a satisfyingly voyeuristic glimpse into the private lives of others as seen through a tumbler or a martini glass, and we are transfixed by the mundane, incidental objects of existence.

Turvey’s portraits of animals are particularly poignant, indicating the complex internal lives of creatures we too rarely consider. A fish is confined to a painfully isolating bowl, his boney frame drifting to the top for food, and a small dog reveals soft, beautifully coiled internal organs as he wears a cone around his head. Similarly, a curious rabbit is shown in dark, moody browns evocative not of medicine so much as psychology and spirit; his wide eyes peer above the hat. These deeply sympathetic animals are made all the more delicate by Turvey’s process, their curiosities and concerns expressed through the barest physicality. (via Smithsonian Mag, The Guardian, and National Geographic)

Currently Trending

Lucy Glendinning’s Strange And Beautiful Feathered Figures

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

Lucy Glendinning

British sculptor Lucy Glendinning creates  ‘Feather Child’, a bird-like, human-like  creature. This strange project originates from Glendinning’s fascination with personal visions, expectations and fears about the future of a highly technologically advanced society. ‘Feather Child’, acting as a semiotic medium,  specifically embodies Glendinning’s questions about the future of genetic manipulation in such a world. The feathers, apart from making a point about what a possible genetically manipulated being might look like, are also a reference to the classic tale of human hubris: Greek mythology’s Icarus.

The feathered child begs its spectator to ponder upon the reality of such fantastical but absurd creations in a world where this will most certainly become a possibility. Will we be able to resist altering our physical abilities and looks if we had to ability to change them? Furthermore, will we, like Icarus, defy our abilities, change them, and as a consequence have everything we worked for fall apart?

Time will only tell what the future has in store for us. (via IGNANT)

Currently Trending