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Francesco Lo Castro’s Shifted Geometric Paintings

Geometric Paintings

Geometric Paintings 1

Transgenesis Geometric Paintings

The geometric paintings of Francesco Lo Castro are made from a time-consuming layering process that combines acrylic, spraypaint, occasional silkscreen and layered epoxy resin to create dynamic explorations of shape and form. This process is so intuitive that the artist says, “Geometry is just a word; it’s an aesthetic. There’s no math involved in it.

The Italian-born, South Florida artist begins his work layering angular, taped-off shapes painted with aerosol and coated with a layer of epoxy resin. This layer is then sanded down, as is every successive layer, until the piece is finished. This process can take up to a month of 12-hour days to complete, according to an interview with New Times. Explaining his work, Lo Castro says “To me, these paintings represent our entire universe. These shapes are atoms. They are galaxies. They are representational of all that combined. They all represent evolving structures that are constantly in flux and ideas that are constantly clashing with each other. And with these clashes, new ideas arise, and we evolve through them. We have billions of people finally waking up and networking with each other; even if we don’t speak the same language, we are getting to know ourselves in the process for the first time. This kind of communication hasn’t happened before.”

Lo Castro expands this point in the interview, explaining that the former lowbrow arts movement star turned to his current geometric style as an evolution – one which mirrors humanities’ own path towards singularity. The artist o notes that his own work has found an international community thanks to technology and internet exposure, and also because of the geometric aesthetic that we can all share. Lo Castro continues, “I think geometry found me, because all you have are these colors and shapes. No matter what your age, your culture, or language you speak, everyone can jump in.” (via coolhunter and broward-palm beach new times)

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Robbie Rowlands’ Precise Cuts

Robbie Rowlands is a Melbourne based artist whose work explores notions of stability and vulnerability through the manipulation of objects and environments. His repetitious and precise cuts and the resulting distortions reflect the inescapable passing of time that affects everything around us. Rowlands’ works have been described as“spotlighting the history, humanity and function” of his subjects. His manipulated objects and spaces blur the boundaries between our fabricated world and the natural world.

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55% Off All B/D Back Issues- One Week Left!

books_on_sale-565x745In honor of Spring, Beautiful/Decay is offering back issues at over 55% off the cover price! We have slashed ‘em down to the lucky price of just $3. Who wants to scrub floors or clear out a dusty garage for “Spring Cleaning” anyways? We suggest you buy some of your favorite B/D back issues, curl up on a porch swing, and savor the feeling of getting a great deal instead. Buy B/D Back Issues here!

This sale ends April 1st and 3 back issues have already sold out so get your copies now!

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Jarritos Flavor City Winners!

Paul Naveda

Paul Naveda, 1st Place

Beautiful/Decay was recently asked to judge the Jarritos Flavor City art & design competition. Contestants were asked to creatively interpret the slogan “DRINK OUT LOUD,” and the winners are in! #1 was artist Paul Naveda, above. Check out the rest of the winners after the jump!

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Max Maslansky

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Max Maslansky is a tricky fellow who seems to believe in longshots. His images caress a romantic past, the voyeuristic present, and a violent future. Each image seems to shake with exerted candor, while holding your hand and telling you things will be okay.

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Embroidery That Mummifies Print Journalism

Lauren DiCioccio - Mixed Media

Lauren DiCioccio - Mixed Media Lauren DiCioccio - Mixed Media

Lauren DiCioccio uses a simple needle and thread on cotton muslin to mummify and honor an endangered artifact– the printed newspaper. In each piece, as The New York Times’ text fades, its correlating cover portraits puncture the surface with pockets of strung together color, reminding us of a certain tactile human unraveling as we adaptively wave goodbye to the Industrial Age.

Of her craft, DiCioccio states, “The tedious handiwork and obsessive care I employ to create my work aims to remind the viewer of these simple but intimate pieces of everyday life and to provoke a pang of nostalgia for the familiar physicality of these objects.”

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Ana Paula Caldas

ana paula caldas
Ana Paula Caldas is a graphic designer from Brazil. We received an email from her earlier to day, but don’t know much about her. Ana’s stuff is pretty awesome though. Most of her work plays around with typography and light, and her images are rather vintage futuristic. Check it out!

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Chris Maynard Crafts Magical Avian Worlds From Feathers

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Artist Chris Maynard creates tiny ethereal designs on feathers. His process begins by collecting feathers of birds (usually not of North America descent) from aviaries and zoos. He uses delicate, detail oriented tools such as eye surgery scissors, forceps, and magnifying glasses that have been passed down to him through his family. With these tools, he is able to achieve intimate levels of detail, crafting miniaturized fantastical avian worlds. His uses his work to transform the ordinary into something surreal and perhaps a bit magical. He explains that he would like the viewer

“to take away being able to look at the world in a different way…I want people to be able to take a breath and look at something a little differently, something that they know. Feathers are a universal symbol. Feathers for different people will mean different things, but generally, it means flight, it can mean escape, something we want to strive for, a bridge between here and the heavens. I want people to take their own message from it, but I think what comes out are some of those themes.”

The original integrity of the feathers is important to the artist. He does not manipulate the color or over arching shape with the aim to “honor the birds and the feathers.” Maynard, having a strong background in biology and ecology, has published a book titled Feathers: Form & Function. He uses his work not only to express artistic notions but also explains origin and function of his material. Each work is intricate, delicate, and whimsical.

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