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The Gruesome Artwork Of Sarah Best Will Give You Goosebumps

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The artist Sarah Best creates astounding replicas of the female body, using it as a symbol that tracks the human desire for connection and intimacy; severed from the rest of the body, her sculpted hands and a cut-out collaged breasts take on a life of their own, worming their way up walls and pages and sometimes tracking blood in the process. The work, though sometimes gruesome, maintains a pulsating beauty; as if with clear intentions, her vital sculptures navigate space, dangling from hooks and exploring piles of cloth.

From both a feminist and an aesthetic standpoint, Best’s work operates in a miraculous, subversive manner; the feminist philosopher Susan Bordo, for example, writes that the body, coded female, is often seen as passive and lacking in intellect, explaining that therefore the body alone has the power to challenge those sexist ideas. Positioning parts of the body within cubistic collages and arresting installations, Best allows it to transcend societal definitions. Rather than figuring as part of a whole to be admired and objectified, limbs actively seek out understanding of the outside world, touching and feeling everything in their paths.

Wonderfully vulnerable yet undeniably powerful, female arm bears Christ-like stigmata, and the physical body searches for spiritual meaning. The oppressive boundaries between the corporeal self— too often considered to be unintelligent, immoral, and “feminine—” and the elevated metaphysical self are effectively shattered, and a new kind of humanity begins to emerge, one to which we can all relate, one that is beautifully desirous, yearning, and sometimes lonesome.

I got the amazing chance to speak with Best, and when I asked what advice she’d give to aspiring artists, she simply said, “Keep your integrity. You will only count, for yourself and in your art, to the extend that you keep your integrity.” Take a look.

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Portia Munson’s….Stuff

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Portia Munson turns one thousand garages worth of plastic kitsch and junk into surprisingly beautiful mounds of stuff that both uplift and mock our contemporary consumer culture. Portia will have a new installation at the PPOW exhibition “Debris” opening March 20th- if you are in NYC be sure to check it out.

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Kelly Kerrigan

When Nashville native Kelly Kerrigan isn’t handcrafting her signature “tramp lamps” from scrap lingerie, she enjoys working with paint on canvas. The strange, yet storybook-like works she creates intrigue, maybe even provoke a little laughter, as, all the while, it is wondered what sort of underlying narrative has brought together Boba Fett and a large, fuzzy rabbit.

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Murray John

“Goodbye London” is the new music video from Luke Jackson, directed and animated by London-based animator Murray John. It combines stop motion photography of London with some nice hand-drawn animation added with After Effects. “I set out to capture the bitter sweetness of London life, using urban sketchy drawings on walls,” says Mr. John.

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Documentary Watch: Married To The Eiffel Tower

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I usually love nutty and bizarre documentaries but I challenge anyone to find a documentary on a more disturbing and messed up subject matter. Married To The Eiffel Tower explores the world of Objectum Sexuals. You’re probably wondering “what’s that?” Well it’s when a human has an emotional and sexual relationship with an object such as a fence, archery bow, banister, bridge, and yes, even the Eiffel Tower. That’s right folks. There is a group of people out there (40 known cases around the world) who fall in love and have sex with buildings and other nonliving objects that we use everyday.

See a women straddle a beam of the Eiffel Tower and groan with pleasure, Watch as a middle aged lady makes out with the Berlin wall, and witness an emotional and passionate woman rub the grease and fluid from a theme park ride all over her body. You’re probably thinking I’m making this up as an early April Fools joke but even I can’t come up with a story like this. Married To The Eiffel Tower is the most bizarre documentary of all time. No books, brochures, or even Wikipedia could ever explain how fully functional adults could end up this way. It’s the ultimate freakish car crash and your front seat ticket is right after the jump.

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Raúl Gasque’s Apocalyptic Portrayal Of An Abandoned Land Is Hopeful And Beautiful

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“This spot was once a prosperous place” says Mexican artist Raúl Gasque. “It used to be one of the top commercial shrimp fishing ports in Mexico and now its an abandoned space.” This photography series, Metonymic Tropic, is Gasque’s way of capturing his nostalgia for what was: an affluent port that thrived during a prosperous economy and the rule of prolific leaders.

The decay shown through these images serve as a visual metaphor of an overall state of destruction and crisis. Although apocalyptic and dark, Gasque’s way of juxtaposing decay and bright blue waters or skies gives the composition an alternate uplifting meaning, one he hopes his viewers can somehow find upon careful and willful inspection.

The photos are metaphors of the present time in humanity: ghost towns, crisis, climate change consequences, but in the horizon the blue skies transmit us a way of hope and redemption.

Even in the darkest of photographs in the collection we are able to pinpoint a source of inspiration and beauty. Destruction always call for re-birth and rehabilitation and it is safe to say that through his photographs, Gasque makes a case of nostalgia but most importantly a myriad of observations that may in fact rebuild his faith in something that might return to the way it was.

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David O’Brien’s Digital Collages of Millions of Tiny Figures

I recently met David O’Brien through a mutual friend while checking out various openings in the Culver City gallery district of Los Angeles.  This type of event draws a specific demographic, and the likelihood that you will end up discussing various aspects of art/the art world is exactly one hundred percent.  Often times these discussions involve an exchange of websites, and an eventual glance into the practice of your recently met acquaintance.  I would be lying if I said that I am generally impressed by the endeavors of my newly made friends, but this time was a pleasant surprise. Not only is David O’Brien a genuinely funny and nice human being – his work is just as engaging to be around.

In his ongoing series Human Entropy O’Brien continues to build a collection of mass portraits using a series of hyper-collage diagrams that investigate personal relationships in a truly unique way.   Much in the same way a painter (in the romantic sense of the word) may have many colors on their palette – O’Brien continues to photograph and amass an array of different people/poses as a personal visual vernacular for composing dynamic large-scale photographs.  O’Brien begins establishing the structure of each piece by placing one figure down at a time, and then repeating this process until the work reaches a level of depth and space that serves his aesthetic and conceptual needs.  Patterns begin to organically emerge from these localized interactions between individual forces to create some very compelling images.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Baltimore Clap

Follow a hapless little chap on a terrifying journey through a cavernous clap factory.

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