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Abstract Street Art Sculptures Hidden In The City

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Las fall street artists MOMO and El Tono were invited collaborate on a project for the Bien Urbain festival in France.  Both artists often work with an abstract painted style.  For their collaboration, though, the artists added a third dimension.  Using pieces of wood, the artists filled gaps in walls and windows throughout the city.  Instead of being unused negative space, the gaps were transformed into a framing device for these abstract compositions.  Simple but elegant, the series is illustrative of innovative trends in street on new approaches to interacting with the urban environment.

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Roger Deckker

Roger deckkerRoger Deckker is an amazing photographer. From landscape to fashion, his work is so rad! With the majority of his fashion photography in black and white or low color saturation, the emotional strength of the image is on point. His photo editing is very fun and creative, which he uses to depict more of a classic 70s style to his images. Check it out!

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Pakayla Biehn’s Double Exposure Paintings

Pakayla Biehn is a San Franciso-based artist who collaborates with photographers in her Double Exposure series, by taking inspiration from double exposure photography and painting the images using oil on canvas. The end result is an incredibly beautiful and detailed series with an oneiric quality.

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Shary Boyle’s Delicately Grotesque

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Shary Boyle‘s  ceramic sculptures combine the delicate with the grotesque.

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The British Library Gives Public Access To Over A Million Beautiful, Rare, And Bizarre Antique Images

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Itching for new source material? The British Library has a public Flickr account that showcases over a million images sourced from books published centuries ago. This account not only gives anyone digital access to a wide range of obscure drawings, photographs, etchings, and others of the likes, it also allows the public to  manipulate and make use of them anyway they chose. The Library released a statement;

“We have released over a million images onto Flickr Commons for anyone to use, remix and repurpose. These images were taken from the pages of 17th, 18th and 19th century books digitised by Microsoft who then generously gifted the scanned images to us, allowing us to release them back into the Public Domain. The images themselves cover a startling mix of subjects: There are maps, geological diagrams, beautiful illustrations, comical satire, illuminated and decorative letters, colourful illustrations, landscapes, wall-paintings and so much more that even we are not aware of”

The images span such a large array of topic areas and media that the librarians aren’t fully aware of what many of the images are. By allowing the public access to these images, the library not only shares them with the masses, but also hopes to collectively acquire knowledge about the content. The Library is planning to release a tool that will allow willing participants to offer information about the images with the aim to create a sort of referential guide.

This is a really amazing resource for artists, illustrators, graphic designers, and just anyone who is in to that sort of thing. Check out the full collection here, or just the highlights here (again, there are over a million).

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A Room Filled With Prints Of All Of The Images Uploaded To Flickr In One Day

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The installation 24 HRS in Photos by Erik Kessels isn’t a typical photography installation.  An entire room at San Francisco’s Pier 24 Photography is filled with photographs.  One end of the room is piled to the ceiling with images cascading down to visitors’ feet.  The photographs at first appear to be innocuous: family photos, vacation photos, smart phone photos.  The immense number of photographs compiled by Kessels, though, are all of the images uploaded to the popular site Flickr in a single day.  Kessels’ installation serves as a clue to astronomical number of images uploaded to the internet constantly.  Even more striking is the way 24 HRS in Photos hints at the sheer saturation of images in day to day life.  Kessels’ installation is part of A Sense of Place, a photography group exhibit on view at Pier 24 Photography through May 2014.

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Tania Hennessy Uses Her Background In Biotech To Create Stunning Drug Themed Jewelry

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The relationship between drugs and art has always been a place of mystery and creation, however, Tania Hennessy’s series of necklaces is a fresh take on these two elements. Her series of “molecular necklaces” combine her knowledge of biochemistry with the art of jewelry making in order to create wearable drug molecules. For this, she uses a 3D printer to laser cut her necklaces from lightweight stainless steel. The 3D printer cuts the material finely thus respecting the intricate patterns of the individual molecules. The necklaces are available in various finishes such as silver, gold, and black.

Her necklaces are simply beautiful at first glance, but they also carry a story: each one represents the molecules that make up different drugs, or chemical elements, amongst which are Ketamine, Cocaine, THC, MDMA and Heroin. She has even created an “Overdose” necklace which stacks up a bunch of different molecules into a magnificent yet deadly cluster of LSD, cocaine, and DMT amongst others.. Hennessy’s necklaces are all the more fascinating because they are both a display of science and aesthetics.

The combination of biochemistry and 3D technology make s for an individual and original form of expression. To those who are well versed in biochemistry, they may look like an inside joke while they may look like a set of pretty shapes to the rest of us. Either way, Hennessy has created a clever work for art that can be both fun to decrypt and to wear.

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William Mortensen’s Photographs Of Witchcraft And Debauchery From The 1920’s Were Ahead Of Their Time

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Photographer William Mortensen (1897-1965) was known throughout his life as someone who took pictures of Hollywood Stars. These were during the 1920s and depicted celluloid figures in a pictorialist romantic style. In his spare time, Mortensen would create images featuring semi-nude women engaged in various acts of witchcraft and debauchery.  Mortensen’s practice of creating elaborately staged scenes and technical effects were ahead of their time. They set certain standards and became popular trends in fine art photography still valid today.

By using different elements in his pictures, Mortensen also turns these unique creations into storyboards filled with narrative. There’s movement and action in these stills which add to their beauty.

Despite the apparent influence, Mortensen would have great debates with Anselm Adams, the great naturalist who would call him a heretic and the anti-Christ. Funny be known now and probably back then too that the anti-Christ would always be much more interesting a subject to ponder in the realm of ideas.

The exhibit, curated by Stephen Romano at the Museum of Morbid Anatomy in Brooklyn, NY focuses on a series called “A Pictorial Compendium of Witchcraft.” The exhibit “Opus Hypnagogia : sacred spaces of the visionary and vernacular.” is a curated collection from The Museum of Everything, London.

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