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Stratis Tavlaridis Constructs Ethereal, Geometric Clothing Out Of Cut Paper

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Stratis Tavlaridis is a Greek artist who constructs perforated objects out of paper. His works are inspired by everyday life, and with his eye for geometric patterns and flowing designs, he transforms ordinary items into ethereal manifestations of themselves. Featured here is a selection of his fashion pieces—shirts and vests that have been immaculately hewn with overlapping shapes and twisting, snake-like outlines. The use of negative space in each object gives it a silky, luminescent quality as light filters through the gaps.

Tavlaridis’ other works include other “textile” objects, such as carpets, tablecloths, and drapery. Often these pieces are included in larger installations, such as Perforated: Weavings of Cohabitation, a homage to his ancestry and culture. Another remarkable piece is his recreation of King Phillip II’s funerary monument—a gauzy, layered entranceway intended to evoke the experience of entering a hallowed space. Whatever he creates using his masterful technique, each of Tavlaridis’ papercut objects is imbued with an awe-striking presence and divine beauty.

Visit his Cargo Collective page to learn more.

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Felipe Pantone’s Hi-Gloss Works Blur The Line Between Graffiti, Design And Hallucinogenic Patterns

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Complete with slick, bold colors and lens flares, artist Felipe Pantone livens up walls and urban environments with his murals. The neon-colored creations are text based and often coupled with geometric and monochromatic patterns. Their energy can’t and won’t be ignored, and it conjures up an aesthetic that’s contemporary, yet feels like it’s out of the late 1990’s thanks to a rainbow combination of gradients that fill the letterforms.

Pantone’s graffit straddles the line between traditional graffiti, typography, and design. It’s this mixture of popular cultures that gives a unique voice, and simultaneously looks familiar but is something all its own.  For someone who might only be familiar with one aspect of Pantone’s multifaceted inspiration, they can find something interesting and meaningful within it (aside it just being fun to look at). (Via The Fox is Black)

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Internet Cat Craze Inspires Handmade Embroidered Dress Shirts

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Internet Cat embroidery

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Hiroko Kubota is a prolific embroiderer whose latest project of embroidering cats onto dress shirts has caused the cat-loving internet community to swoon. Kubota stitches cats who peek over and through shirt pockets and openings, giving plain dress shirts an adorable and unique accent. Her project began when her son – a cat-lover and collector of internet cat images – requested that she embroider some cats from his collection onto some shirts she made for him. After posting her work on the internet, her project quickly became popular and of high demand. Kubota then decided to put some of her shirts up for sell on Etsy, but her handiwork could not keep up with the demand – even at a hefty price tag of $250-300 apiece. Kubota also embroiders other figures, such as fish, Pokemon characters, dogs, and flowers onto a variety of objects. You can check out more images of her work on Flickr. (via colossal)

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Dima Rebus

The illustrations of young Russian artist Dima Rebus may not be in-your-face flashy or neon bright, but they are bright in a different way. Less is more in these cases, as he inserts subtle humor into just about every piece he makes. He imagines a world in which handcuffed delinquents enjoy a spot of tea before their booking and where the riot police cavort with rioters in the streets – and any art that lets me use words like ‘cavort’ when talking about it, well, it’s alright by me.

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Nightshop Creates Trippy, Soft-Looking Rugs Out Of Colorful Liquid Foam

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In April, Ward van Gemert and Adriaan van der Ploeg of the Rotterdam-based design studio Nightshop will be showcasing their unique “décor” at the Robert van Oosterom Gallery: large-scale rugs made out of colorful foam. Each one is created from the artists’ unique blend of urethane foam, which they put into syringes and squeeze out into spiraling and cross-hatched designs. Once the foam dries, it fuses to the adjacent “thread” and thereby creates a solid piece. There are currently seven carpets completed, and the artists plan to finish three more by the exhibition.

While the rugs appear functional (and comfortable—perhaps due to that soft, clay-like appearance), the artists have stated that they’re “they’re more objects without a clear use,” intended to be viewed as art pieces (Source). As colorful curiosities, they blend the traditional art form of carpet weaving with modern kitsch; the are reminiscent of everything from playroom décor to a carpet as seen during a psychedelic trip. On their studio’s About page, Nightshop professes to “bring aspects of ‘low-culture’ into their designs,” thereby “investigating the boundaries between good and bad taste” (Source). The foam rugs bring our attention to everyday objects, highlighting their innate design characteristics and artistic, culturally-relevant merit.

Visit Nightshop to learn more and view their other creations. The exhibition at the Robert van Oosterom Gallery will be called Showdown. (Via The Creators Project)

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Michael Clark

 

I’ll be the first to admit that I know absolutely nothing about dance, especially when it comes to ballet. I am, however, a huge Fall fan, which led me to these videos of choreography by Michael Clark, a British dancer who famously shook up the modern dance world by staging avant-garde productions often set to experimental or post-punk music. These clips come from a 1988 ballet called “I Am Curious, Orange” which was scored entirely by The Fall. As far as I can tell, there hasn’t been much proper documentation done of this work, but these YouTube clips, taken from Charles Atlas’ long out of print film Hail the New Puritan will have to suffice.

 

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Liam Gerrard Turns The Grotesque Into The Wondrous Just With A Stick Of Charcoal On Paper

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Artist and illustrator Liam Gerrard is a master of trickery – especially when armed with a piece of charcoal in his hand. He draws meticulous combinations of animals (usually dead), pop stars, cultural icons, and beautiful snippets of nature (mostly flowers), that he describes as ‘Semi-Realistic-Gothic-Awesome-Dark-Magic-Black-Tracing’ (Source). Gerrard builds his complicated compositions from different elements to create a surreal hybrid of modern day life. Specializing in portraiture mostly, his work deals with ideas of beauty, life, death and how humankind deals with those complex issues that we are commonly faced with. Leafa Wilson writes about him in her essay:

He apprehends our desire to ‘perve’ at aesthetically beautiful things and people by giving us a few truths we may struggle to look at; ugliness executed with absolute beauty…..He underpins beauty and death through a marriage of Gothic darkness and pop-icon stellar-brightness that totally munts up the readings of his extensive visual vocabulary. Debbie Harry becomes the poster girl for Satan and Frida Kahlo is set aside with her monkeys in a surreal type vignette. (Source)

Gerrard does choose quite gothic material to focus on, but manages to turn it into something that is beautiful and wondrous. He garnered a lot of attention after drawing a 2.5 m charcoal and acrylic painting of convicted murderer Clayton Weatherston. The subject of the controversy had stabbed his 22 year old victim, Sophie Elliott, 216 times and was sentenced to 18 years in jail, without parole. And even with such a gruesome topic that many people would not care to know more about, he somehow managed to create an object of curiosity and interest. And that is enough proof of his immense talent. See more of it after the jump.

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Paul Windle’s Mid-70’s Baseball Dudes

Mid-seventies basbeall dudes by Brooklyn based illustrator Paul Windle.

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