Get Social:

Art Basel Miami: Day 2

Highlights from Day 2: Art Miami & Pulse Art Fair

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Expressive environmental portraits by Stefan Ruiz

I’ve been a fan of Stefan Ruiz’s work for a while, I collected most of the issues of COLORS magazine he worked on several years ago. He documents people, places, and objects from around the world that are both strange and familiar. I especially love his portraits; he conveys so much personality and narrative in such concise elegant images.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

A Show of Heads

vanitas-1

If you’re a fan of sculpture be sure to check out Cinema Gallery’s exibition A Show of Heads. The exhibit tackles a wide array of subjects from which the artists reflect upon the psychological struggles that are fundamental to self-inquiry and the attempt to understand other human beings. It explores the pathos of idealism undermined by reality and the elusiveness of inner peace as promised by spiritual enlightenment.

A Show of Heads features work from Tom Bartel, Tanya Batura, Cristina Cordova, Thaddeus Erdahl, Judy Fox, Arthur Gonzalez, Roxanne Jackson, Doug Jeck, Akio Takamori, and Tip Toland.

Looks like an amazing exhibition, check out some of the artists after the jump!

Currently Trending

Illustrations of Pop Culture Figures Dancing by Jesse Lonergan

 

Illustrator and comics artist Jesse Lonergan is drawing a “Dancer a Day”. Every day, he draws an icon from movies, music, cartoons, pop culture, etc. in a “dancing pose”. He posts the quick sketches to his “Dancer a Day” blog. Just a really fun, loose project. Who doesn’t dig the image of a groovy Hannibal Lecter or a b-boy Gonzo? What about a super fab “The Dude”, or Godzilla and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man cutting a rug on top of a metropolis? Some more selections after the jump and head over to the page itself, where Lonergan’s already amassed a pretty large collection of dancers. (via)

Currently Trending

Terrifying Barbie Tidal Wave Composed Of 5,000 Dolls

annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-02annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-04annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-01annette-thas-builds-a-giant-wave-wave-of-barbie-dolls-designboom-05

For the artist Annette Thas, Barbie is a disturbingly bittersweet symbol of childhood nostalgia and longing; for installation piece “Wave I,” she uses between 3,000 and 5,000 barbie dolls to build a sculptural wave, re-appropriating the doll as a means of translating her earliest memories, scenes which now flood her after returning to Belgium to care for her ill sister. Her sister’s illness, she explains, was related to the childhood they shared, one that was marked in part by the death of her brother.

For the artist, the wave is meant to convey her own relationship to overwhelming memories; it is 4 meters wide and stands at 3 meters tall, forcing viewers to be encased completely within its depths. The piece seems to swell with cascading blond hair, forever caught at the terrifying moment before its breaking. Adding to its realism, Thas chose to exhibit it on the beach as part of 2014’s Sculpture by the Sea amidst the sounds and smells of real waves.

The barbies in the piece, wild hair tangled and stripped of their clothing, do indeed seem ominous, but they are also startlingly sympathetic. They are second-hand toys, once loved but eventually discarded. They have endured a sort of violence, having been scarred by knives and bite marks. Each one has a poignant narrative all her own; one doll simply bears the words “please love me” on her chest. The plastic toys, symbolic of the scores of children who once owned them, are somehow lonesome now, robbed of childhood’s affections. Their demanding presence is urgent and desperate, their blue eyed faces pressing us to remember both the magical and painful bits of our youths. (via Design Boom)

Currently Trending

Put on your Photobooth face forward

Mark Pernice

Artist Mark Pernice has turned our ultimate Photobooth fantasy into reality. Using Apple’s Photo Booth application as inspiration, the idea was to take the 2D image that it manipulated and create a tangible face in a real environment, then in turn bring it back into a 2D image. Using Photo Booth on the mask itself may create some sort of paradoxical shift where the artist ceases to exist.

Currently Trending

Ulric Collette Splices Together Family Members To Compare Physical Similarities

Ulric Collette photography6

Son / Father: Nathan, 7 & Ulric, 29

Ulric Collette photography3

Cousins: Justine, 29 & Ulric, 29

Ulric Collette photography2

Brothers: Christophe, 30 & Ulric, 29

The series Genetic Portraits almost works as a casual study.  Quebec based photographer Ulric Collette seamlessly blends the faces of two relatives to create one portrait that is hard to look away from.  The resulting photographs highlight the differences an emphasize the similarities between siblings, children, parents, and cousins.  It is nearly as if the images are a visualization of the genetic traits traveling between generations.  Genetic Portraits is also an absorbing record of time’s effect on physical appearance.  Eye  s, for example, appear to be near exact copies between father and son, separated only by the wear of thirty years.

Currently Trending

Matt Leines’ Hyperbolic At Beginnings NYC

Matt Leines currently lives and works in Brooklyn. He recently opened a solo exhibition entitled Hyperbolic at Beginnings NYC. From the quirky press release: “First there was Da Vinci, then Picasso and now there is Matt Leines and this show is called Hyperbolic. Ever the patient and earnest image-maker, surrealist sign-painter and erstwhile myth-shaper, Leines relocated to New York after a spell in Philadelphia during the year in which the world was scheduled to end. Settling into a fresh rhythm, he began a series of paintings that drew on those familiar rituals, traced the good ol’ sigils, but manipulated colors and shapes from the present with an attitude more formal, bright and tight. The young man in the studio considering a renaissance–small “r”. Real, live inscrutable people and chattering patterns. A happy creature drifting through the kitchen cosmos. Native American name-givers and the zig-zag of eternity. Leines’ recent output is a reminder that creative, figurative work has always been foundational to modern art.” The show is on view through May 5th 2013.

Currently Trending