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Pantone Colors, Typography And Pop Culture Collide In Panto’ N’ Roll

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Chic & Artistic is a Paris based multi-disciplined creative studio working in a wide array of mediums and styles. Their Panto’ N’ Roll series caught my eye and immediately made me chuckle. Mixing pop culture references, typography and Pantone color chips, they have created a humorous word/image association game for all of us to enjoy. (via)

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The Functioning Hydraulic Powered Sculptures James Capper

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These sculptures by artist James Capper are working hydraulic implements.  Their primary colors, spare design, and steel build make the pieces out to be purely utilitarian construction tools.  However, these aren’t actual power tools and they don’t necessary build anything.  Instead they sit menacingly with feeling like of the premonition of violence.  You can almost hear the hiss and huff of air powering the blades.  Perhaps the tools are a hint at the violence implicit in production and progress.

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Alex Hohlov

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Philadelphia-based designer Alex Hohlov, aka Veone, does some nice procedurally generated abstract pieces when he’s not doing commercial work. The illustrations convey a strong sense of motion…it reminds me of what flying through hyperspace might look like.

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Matthew Pillsbury Documents Coming Out As A Gay Man With His Haunting Photographs

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Nate and Me, Desperate Housewives Sunday, October 16th, 2005 9-10pm

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Matthew Pillsbury‘s long exposure photography series, “Screen Lives,” largely documents domestic activity related to screens that glow from televisions, computers, or mobile phones. Eleven of those photographs, however, represent a specific time during Pillsbury’s life when he fell in love with a man, left his wife, and came out as a gay man to his friends and family. This event changed the direction of Pillsbury’s project. While initially focused on photographing screen scenes with subjects who didn’t move around as much, Pillsbury’s project evolved once he met Nate. “I think it took the freedom of my coming out to make a picture like the one of Nate in Vegas or Cell Phone on Venice Beach. I was breaking down the very rules I had set for my own artistic project,” Pillsbury said. Documenting movement, intimacy, and relationship dynamics, Pillsbury’s collection is at once haunting and lucid.

The eleven photographs representing this transition are titled “Nate and Me” and will be on view at the Sasha Wolf Gallery in NYC until April 20. (via slate)

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Yayoi Kusama’s Obliteration Room Will Have You Seeing Dots

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A children’s project by Yayoi Kusama has people seeing dots, lots of them. Called The Obliteration Room, the renowned artist known for her sculptures and paintings of dots, decided to have a little fun with the kids. She created an interactive installation geared towards children which asked occupants to enter an all white room and stick the walls and furniture with colorful dots. This allowed participants in essence to make Kusama art. The installation was designed to enable the child part of your brain to run free and create.
Currently displayed at Queensland Art Gallery, the before and after pictures are nothing less than remarkable. In some ways mimicking connect the dots paintings where a gradual buildup occurs, we see how the all-white room is turned into a lively display of dots which turns the stark environment into a colorful painterly mess.
According to Kusama, The Obliteration Room is a place where you empty all your thoughts. The dots become therapeutic, meditative shapes which in Kusama’s case has helped her stay sane. Now at 85, the artist doesn’t keep it a secret that she lives as an outpatient at a mental hospital in Japan. In the 1960’s she was at the forefront of anti-war art demonstrations, in particular protesting the vietnam war. Her work is shown worldwide and is considered one of the more important artists of our time. (via juxtapoz)

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Kris Kuksi’s Churchtanks

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The work of artist Kris Kuksi has a decidedly consistent style.  His amazingly intricate sculptures are often dark, reference both the classical world and the industrial landscape, and comment on religion and politics.  His Churchtanks series, though, seems to especially encapsulate his philosophies.  Kuksi seamlessly fuses gaudy cathedrals with modern war tanks to create one imposing structure.  In a strange way, the aesthetics of each seems to compliment the other.  Kuksi effectively uses the structural blending to comment on a connection between religion and violence.

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Video Watch: Hennessy Youngman’s “Art Thoughtz”

NYC via Philly-based artist, Jayson Musson, (previously), has periodically posted videos to Youtube for about a year now under the header “Art Thoughtz.” In the videos, Musson assumes the identity of satirical figure Hennessy Youngman, a hilarious HipHop head-cum-fine art critic.  Youngman’s brand of satire is the best there is: “make fun of everyone and everything.” So far, Musson’s taken on art world figures as varied as Damien Hirst, Kehinde Wiley, and Marina Abromović, and applied his unique logic in lampooning concepts like institutional critique, surrealism, beauty, and socio/political art. Watch the latest “Art Thoughtz” after the jump.

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Modern Day Ophelia: Photographers Reimagine Haunting Scenes Of Women Underwater

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The photographic studio founded and run by Robert Staudinger and Andreas Franke (based in Vienna) have been experimenting with many different post production techniques for a while. Their recent fascination is with water. Photographing different women just beneath the surface of water, their series Barrier is like a ghostly fairytale. The women seem to either be sinking down into the depths below, postmortem, or in a state of serenity and peace, enjoying a moment of calm. We are not quite sure whether the barrier is a help or a hindrance; something to protect the women or to hurt them. The images capture an intrusive moment, either like watching someone during their final moments of life, or having an intimate bathing experience. Whatever it is, Staudinger and Franke exploit the tension between tranquility and unease; push and pull; immersion and separation.

Playing with the concept of water in the past (The Phantasy Fairytales), Staudinger and Franke seem interested in exploring the quietness and other-worldliness of the substance. By including the element in their images, it changes the mood quite drastically, and in most cases makes it seem more surreal, ethereal and eerie.

Franke has also shot an old shipwreck off the coast of Key West (Vandenberg Project), digitally adding in components later on to complete the shots. Including ballet dancers, kickboxers, a girl holding a butterfly net, a woman hanging out laundry, and a whole lot of other surreal details, Franke became experienced in recreating watery effects on his subjects to blend them in seamlessly, and somewhat believably. To see more of their beautiful skills see here. (Via Art Fucks Me)

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