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Bill Davenport: My Collection of Thrift Store Paintings

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Recent Artadia Awardee Bill Davenport collects thrift Store Paintings. Davenport also has a Treasury of Macrame Owls, and makes his own Yarn Works, among other practices. Originally posted HERE

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Devorah Sperber Pixelated Thread Spool Icons

Using hundreds of thread spools and a clear viewing sphere,  Devorah Sperber creates pixelated images of pop culture icons, famous logos, and reinterpretations of blue chip artworks. These works not only make viewers take a second look at the threaded installations but use the “wow” power of optical illusions to make us reconsider these famous icons and masterpieces from arts past.

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Jonathan Robert LeBlanc

Landscape photography is a fickle mistress.  Jonathan Robert LeBlanc’s photographs weave an elaborate tapestry of cramped urban decay and endless country skies- facing history with little or no irony.

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Grégory Chatonsky Creates An Endless Mountain Range Of Kim Kardashian’s Face That Critiques Meaninglessness In Social Media

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The psychological effects of social media—seductive vortexes that they are—are well discussed. Every day, we are saturated with idealized bodies and enviable lifestyles—unreasonable standards of happiness and fulfillment that are based purely on constructed images. Seeking to criticize this culture of obsession and apparent emptiness, French artist Grégory Chatonsky has created a bizarre amalgam of Kim Kardashian’s face featuring more than 51,000 photos of her tagged on Instagram. Using a software program he designed using Unity3d, images of Kim K’s face are pulled and generated into a sea of amassed and distorted flesh. The effect is overwhelming and somewhat nauseating; facial features sink, expand, liquefy, and solidify like crushed and melted Barbie dolls. Chatonsky has literally transformed the celebrity’s face into an endless, empty landscape.

This project comes at a funny time, with Kim K’s book of never-before-seen photos, entitled Selfish, hitting the shelves last May. Chatonsky’s choice of her face is rooted in a blunt criticism, as he views her image as the benchmark of meaninglessness in the self-serving application of social media: “She has no talent, she has nothing exceptional, she is none other than our own design, that is to say the way she [is] represented to us,” he told The Creator’s Project. “It is simply an extended skin, everything is on the surface. There is nothing to look behind” (Source). Terrifyingly, the digital collage continues to grow and morph on its own. With intensity, humor, and a heavy dose of dizzying insanity, Perfect Skin II jabs us with a postmodern critique that visually demonstrates how the image—while highly valued in our digital culture—is a flat, empty simulacrum empowered by obsession and replicated beyond meaning or logic.

Check out Chatonsky’s website to view other fascinating and speculative projects, such as a contemplation on the photograph as a desperate—but finite—imprint of our times on Earth, and the discovery of the data humans will leave behind post-apocalypse. This latter project, entitled Extinct Memories, is made in collaboration with Dominique SiroisChristophe Charles, and Jussi Parikka and will be opening at Brussel’s Interactive Media Art Laboratory in September of this year. (Via The Creators Project)

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World’s First 3D Printed Room

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The fascinating possibilities of 3D printing are getting bigger, particularly with the unveiling of one of the most ambitious printed projects yet, the Baroque-by-way-of-Bitmapped sculpture titled Digital Grotesque. Conceived by architects Michael Hansmeyer and Benjamin Dillenburger, the duo claim their project is the world’s first 3D printed room. Computer algorithms designed most of the structure’s 260 million surfaces, which were printed in sections using a composite sand and binding agent to create a sandstone-like material. When each 4 meter tall, 1 meter wide and 3 meter deep sections were manually placed, the enclosure measures 16 feet and weighs a staggering 11 tons.

According to their website, the architects believe that “New materials and fabrication methods have historically led to radical changes in architectural design. They have indeed been the primary drivers in its evolution. Today, additive manufacturing heralds a revolution in fabrication for design. Yet in architecture, this technology has up to now been used only for small scale models. Digital Grotesque takes additive manufacturing technology to a true architectural scale. Not a small model is printed, but the actual room itself.”

Perhaps most compelling from an art perspective (or at least an art-historical perspective) is the logical conclusion the duo’s project makes. “The Digital Grotesque project opens the door to the printing of architecture. It suggests that 3D sandstone printing can be applied both to restoring historic buildings and to constructing new ones.” One can only imagine the possibilities that this technology will yield for museum research, archaeological recreation, and art exhibitions in the coming decades. (via oddly_even)

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Design Watch: Muuto Pendant Lamp

We here at B/D think product design is an important aspect of the design and art spectrum because product designers create the objects we live with every day. Artfully designed objects can make your life easier, or in this case brighter, and look good doing it. At first glance this looks like your classic metal pendant lamp, but it’s made of rubber that you can squish! This unexpected element and the bright colors are why we love this Pendant lamp by Form Us With Love for Muuto, if you love it too, it’s available at A+R, click here.

 

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Rescued Lab Rodents Take Part In An Enchanting “Alice in Wonderland” Photoshoot

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Italian charity La Collina dei Conigli ONLUS rescues rabbits, mice, rats, and guinea pigs from labs or mistreatment. The now-adoptable pets were the recent subjects of a photo series by Rachele Totaro that’s inspired by Lewis Carroll’s famous novel Alice in Wonderland. Volunteer Attilia Conti had the idea, and it commemorates the first 10 years of the charity’s operation. So, why Alice in Wonderland? Because the book and organization both started with a white rabbit.

The fantastical photographs feature the animals holding objects, poking out of a teapot, and of course, gazing into the looking glass. “Mice were the most cooperative models, while guinea pigs were the laziest (they stayed still only with food present),” Totaro writes. “Rats were the most attractive, and rabbits… were the most disapproving.” You can see that with some of the critters, there was no coercing them into any sort of cutesy pose.

The charity’s rescue center is located in Monza, near Milan, and many of the animals are still looking for new homes. If you’re local to the city, you can adopt one. (Via Bored Panda)

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Louise Despont

Lets keep the posts about ornate & detailed drawings going today with the fantastical drawings of Louise Despont.

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