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Motoi Yamamoto’s Incredible Salt Installations

A photo of Motoi Yamamoto on all fours, creating these masterpieces, is all you really need to see to figure it all out.  Even for those of us who haven’t listened to the mind of our inner child so consistently, it’s obvious that Motoi focuses, and creates.  In the video we included above of Yamamoto creating these incredible installations, the painstaking scope of the work is put into perspective, making the clear connection between meditation, clarity of mind, and ability to create.  This is to say, aside from these installations, we doubt he has any need to meditate. The targeted concentration he employs while creating is a function of total dedication to a vision.  Much like we all did when the first building blocks or Lego’s were tossed at our feet.  The mode is white wall, but for us, the process of creating the art is what makes this so exceptional. With a CV that looks like a yellow book, we’re clearly not the first to have latched on to the captivating works of this incredible Japanese artist. (via i paint my mind)

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ALFRED STEINER

Drawings by Alfred Steiner.

“Alfred Steiner, part intellectual draftsman, part pop culture surgeon. His works on hot press paper consisted of characters and scenes from the popular to the ambitious—Shaggy and Fred from Scooby Doo!, the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, Saint Anthony—all composed of jutting, blood-tipped bones and glistening, sinewy muscle. Profiles were assembled not with soft lines but with femurs, horses galloped not with hooves but on bare bone and demons brandished swords of muscle over prostrate outlines of pus and blood. Steiner creates a disorienting, dreamy and disturbingly beautiful feast for the eyes, calling to mind large masterworks of surgeons operating in an amphitheater, though one believes it is Steiner whose work operates on us, rather than vice versa. By creating instantly recognizable outlines from the most vital and basic parts of human anatomy, Steiner forces us to look at the culture around us while acknowledging the literal cultures within us.”Sarah Hassan

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Mindy Rose Schwartz

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There’s something really sweet girly 70’s about Mindy Rose Schwartz’s sculptures. They remind me of Yoshitomo Nara’s dreamy-sensibility.

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The Paintings Of Femke Hiemstra Are An Incredibly Bold Cabinet Of Curiosities

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Using a Cabinet of Curiosity aesthetic, Femke Hiemstra creates a carnivalistic fantasy world. In her oeuvre the roles of humans and animals are blurred placed in odd scenarios which offer humorous and dark tales of sacrifice, war and performance. Taking references from classic novels such as Gulliver’s Travels and ancient folk tales, it’s obvious that these should be made into cinema because the images are so fully animated. However, their 2D nature turns them into fine art illustration and allows the viewer to look further and take a lasting moment to linger in their imagination.

Hiemstra’s play on words further enhance the narrative in her paintings. One called “groupies” is especially humorous showing a female singing apple watched in awe by her grouper audience. It’s a classic example of the type of work Hiemstra makes which combines the bizarre with popular culture to tell stories which recall nursery rhymes and absurdist commentary. Her style brings to mind an artist I was very fond of years ago called Elizabeth Albert. She also used animals in odd narratives to tell stories about human behavior and circumstance.

Hiemstra’s illustrations are created using a light acrylic paint and water. She often tops her work with colored pencils which give it that extra definition. She mostly uses paper or panel but occasionally will paint on old books and wooden antiques like clocks or religious objects. She sells prints of her original artwork at a very reasonable price of 100 euros on average. (via hifructose)

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Quiet Ensemble Creates An Orchestra That Plays The Sound Of Light

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Italian sound designers Fabio Di Salvo and Bernardo Vercelli, together known as Quiet Ensemble, create work that features insignificant sounds that we wouldn’t give a second thought to. They focus their energies on the “greatness of small events,” and the subject of their most recent project is a lamp. Specifically, lamps used to produce a musical event. Titled The Enlightenment, the duo calls this performance a “hidden concert of pure light” that uses a bevy of different lighting elements like stage lights and high-powered bulbs. “Instead of violins are neon lights, to replace drums are strobe lights and instead of clarinets we will see theatrical headlights illuminating the audience,” they explain in the video’s description.

The Enlightenment was performed in October for Bologna’s Robot Festival, where it included 96 lamps. Each was fitted with its own copper coil that received various electric currents set at specific intervals, as well as a sensor. This produced an electromagnetic field that was captured and turned into sounds. Salvo and Vercelli accompanied the buzzes by modifying and amplifying each lamp’s electric output in real time. The result is a clash of blues, greens, and yellow flashes with the poetics of a familiar buzz. (Via The Creators Project)

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The Dreamy Sculptures of MyeongBeom Kim

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The sculptures and installations of MyeongBeom Kim are very dreamlike – it makes just enough sense to prevent you questioning it.  Objects transform into other objects, other inexplicably float, and yet others are designed to be entirely useless.  Yet, somehow, it all seems right.  Also like dreams, Kim’s work is playful but not without out a latent sense of anxiety.  A noose, a crutch, an axe suggest a possible dark turn toward realized fears, a nightmare.

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Valerio Loi Explores Social Media By Turning Online Popularity Into Supermarket Goods

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Valerio Loi is a photographer who currently works between London and his birthplace of Cagliari, Italy. In a series of images called Web Popularity Products, Loi envisions a future where online popularity has been turned into physical commodities, just like food at the supermarket. With bright colors and labels stamped with the familiar icons of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Badoo, and LinkedIn, Loi’s “products” sit inconspicuously on store shelves amongst mayonnaise and cans of corned beef. While things like Instagram followers can already be purchased online (although it is often a ridiculed practice), the increasing value of one’s online presence could one day mean we consume simulated “popularity” alongside our processed and over-packaged foods.

“The more social networks are born, the more purchasable services to increase users’ popularity are created,” Loi observes on his project description. “Alongside our physical life based on face to face interaction, nowadays many of us consider . . . online image and networking [to be really important]” (Source). In some ways, Loi’s work displays an anxiety over the current trend of social media that seems to undermine genuine human connections; his other personal project, titled Human Feelings as Drugs, similarly explores this fear of the commodification and loss of our deepest experiences and emotions. However, Loi photographs his Web Popularity Products in a relatively innocent light, allowing the viewers to decide for themselves whether social media will lead to practical transformations of human identities, or the spiritual bankruptcy thereof.

Visit Loi’s website, Facebook, and Instagram to learn more.

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Lou Beach

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Los Angeles-based pop illustrator Lou Beach has been creating these bright, comical collages since the 70s and 80s. While collage work doesn’t normally do it for me, I like this stuff. He’s also done a ton of commercial work over the years, including album covers like Blink 182’s opus, Dude Ranch.

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