Get Social:

Jason Lazarus Collects Anonymous Photos Deemed “Too Hard To Keep”

JasonLazarus-1 JasonLazarus-5 JasonLazarus-8 JasonLazarus-9

You probably have at least a photo (or two) that’s just too painful to look at. Whether it depict deceased loved one, a failed relationship, or be a symbol of a time long past, the sight is an unwelcome reminder of something (or someone) that’s gone. Since 2010, photographer Jason Lazarus has archived these images that are “too hard to keep” by their owners. He accepts the anonymous submissions and gives them a new life in the form of art exhibitions and books. Although their ownership has changed hands, their past isn’t forgotten.

These are a selection of photos that Lazarus has received over the years. With some of the images, you can immediately understand why they’re painful. One features dying cat laying on a cold metal table. Another is part of photobooth image of a couple that’s been torn into pieces. It’s also accompanied by a handwritten note.

With other photographs, it’s harder to understand why it was too hard to keep them. A seemingly-innocuous lush green landscape and a smiling snowman are another two submissions that Lazarus received. But, regardless of what they are, they meant something to someone at one time, and that’s the appeal of Lazarus’ project. It’s easy to relate to the feelings of loss, anger, and longing that these photos conjure to their original owners. These submissions are a reminder that we all hurt.

Vice is currently collecting photos that are too hard to keep, and they’ll publish a selection of the images. If you’re interested in participating, find out more here.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Michael Johansson

Michael Johnsson

Swedish artist Michael Johansson is probably the undisputed master of 3D Tetris. Look at how all the parts of that machine fit into each other! I love his play on the idea of materials and their assembly in the creation of average household and office-hold (?) goods- returning them to nature, bringing them out of nature…popping them out of and retuning them to their molds.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Cristin Richard Explores Race And Identity With Dresses That Resemble Skin

Screen Shot 2014-01-09 at 1.14.20 PM
Screen Shot 2014-01-09 at 1.13.58 PM

Cristin Richard

Cristin Richard

Cristin Richard is in the movement of artists whose work is related to the body and identity. Her work examines the human condition and the fact that the body is physically and mentally determined in this condition. It is thus the window of our relation to the world. She transcribes her own personal story through impulses to existential questions.

In this particular work, The Political Aesthetics of the Skin, Richard plays with fashion, sculpture, performance and social commentary in order to bring forth these beautifully made gowns that resemble the look and feel of human skin.

Here, Richard is interested in examining the body, personal identity, as well as sculptural objects in a subtle but powerful way. She explores these themes by creating sculptural dresses that resemble skin color and skin textures made out of animal intestines. Richard’s usage of organic material, is what gives her looks the means to exist as throughly manipulated pieces, an obvious detail that makes her fashion garments have more of a sculptural feel than just regular fashion pieces. After creating the dresses, the Detroit based artist puts together an elegant performance that include women of several skin shades; she purposely finds models that perfectly match the dresses’ skin color tones. Although her pieces are wearable and highly fashionable, here, the dresses go beyond trends.

With the idea of fashion as sculpture, Cristin Richard blurs the line between fine art and fashion. She believes that fashion allows one to create a second skin. It provides an escape that is rooted in the truth to one’s own identity. One can transform themselves into whatever makes them feel good, allowing them to approach society in their own unique way. Through these observations, the artist develops and analyzes the subject of the appearance of one’s self, and also that of one another.

Currently Trending

Pamela Saturday’s Exploding Installations

Interdisciplinary artist Pamela Saturday has a body of work that toys with layering both in painting and installation. Her game of hide and reveal creates a fantastic energy. From her statement she says “any truth is partial, and that the actual includes potential” which I think perfectly describes her work.

Currently Trending

Portraits of Chinese Swimmers Showcase a New Fashion Trend, “Facekinis”

pengyangjun3 pengyangjun9 pengyangjun4 pengyangjun5

There’s a new fashion craze that’s happening along Eastern China’s seaside city, Qingdao. Publicly-dubbed “Facekinis,” are protective head masks that are being worn by many beachgoers (mostly women). Photographer Peng Yangjun has documented them in a series of portraits that are set against the backdrop of the beach.

The colorful style is no doubt a strange one, and it’s reminiscent of luchadore and ski masks. This bizarre fashion trend has a more practical purpose, however, and that’s to protect swimmers from the sun, in addition to repelling insects and jellyfish. It’s often paired with long-sleeve bodysuits that help people maintain their natural complexion because bronze skin is often associated with those who perform physical labor in many Asian countries.

We’re often used to seeing swimmers wearing next to nothing or going completely nude. This style takes modesty to the next level, completely covering people up rather than stripping them down. It’s a surreal sight to see someone posed with bare arms and legs but a completely covered face; the photographs showcase an individual style but are devoid of the feeling and emotion we read from the face.  (Via Flavorwire)

Currently Trending

Kacper Kowalski’s Mesmerizing Photos Of The Polish Forest From Bird’s Eye View

kacper5 kacper1 kacper8 kacper6

Photographer Kacper Kowalski captures life from above in these beautiful images of the Polish woodlands. The bird’s eye view features incredible, vibrant shots that are simultaneously recognizable and abstract. Brilliant greens, blues, pinks, and purples dot the landscape and play with our sense of scale. Trees look minuscule in many of the compositions, like they’re pipe cleaners or tiny army.

There’s a divide in many of Kowalski’s photos whether it by a river, a road, or line of trees. This separated area creates a pause or compositional breath. We’re often overwhelmed by texture or patterns. The photographer’s decision to include these areas allows time for reflection and comparison. How are the two spaces different? How are they same? What does it mean for them to coexist? (via a_a)

Currently Trending

Installation: 400 Chairs Assembled into a Sine Wave for Freedom Park in Atlanta

“Sitting is perhaps the most common condition from which we experience architecture. Whether we work, relax, watch, eat, sleep, or talk to each other, sitting is at the core of our relationship to buildings.”

“SEAT” is an installation in Atlanta’s Freedom Park produced by E/B Office (Ju Lee and Brian Brush). The piece involves 400 chairs assembled in a sine wave formation “drawn into an agitated vortex rising from the ground.”

The “SEAT” pavilion was organized in part by Flux Projects, an Atlanta based public arts organization. (via)

Currently Trending

Daniel K Sparkes

Daniel K Sparkes, mixed media

Daniel K Sparkes started his career in the British street art scene since the 2000s. His work is a juxtaposition of photographs, paintings and drawings that combined depict burlesque portraiture, illustrations and landscape. As if eaten alive, the portraits remain anonymous and faceless, yet there is plenty detail where the face or limbs should have been. These faceless and limbless portraitures are playful, disturbing and interesting, especially when done in large scale, as example of some of his murals.

Currently Trending