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DAVID BEREZIN’S STOCK PHOTO STILL LIFES


San Francisco-based artist David Berezin creates still lifes by manipulating low-res stock photos, often found on Google Images, and Photoshopping the disparate parts into coherent collages that mimic commercial photography. Berezin’s use of “new media” methods of making produces an ironic contrast between contemporary, post-internet life and all that cultural baggage left by the Twentieth century’s top-down, capitalist media. These digital assemblages make the ha-has by reconstructing the out-moded logic of genre narratives through the use of culturally-loaded objects that rely on vocabularies of cliché developed in pop forms like B-movies and boilerplate novels.

Berezin’s artwork is on display in The Art of Cooking at the L.A. gallery Royal T until August 1st; and a video loop of Berezin’s, Fun For a While, is showing at the Columbus Museum of Art in Columbus, Ohio, until June 30th.

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Michelle Wasson

Love the brushwork in these semi-abstract still life paintings by Michelle Wasson. The mark making feels perfectly effortless but extremely precise.

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James Turrell

Bridget's Bardo (Ganzfeld Piece)

Bridget's Bardo (Ganzfeld Piece)


James Turrell is one of the most important artists in the world dealing in light and space. Born in Los Angeles in 1943, Turrell studied mathematics, psychology and sensory synesthesia as well as art at university. He flies around the desert in little planes and has devoted the best part his working life to turning a volcano into a piece of land art. “The spaces you encounter during flight can be amazing: meeting the dawn or watching the Aurora Borealis,” he says and describes an experience of taking off once at dawn and seeing the sunlight trapped between ground fog below and cloud cover above. These words paint a perfect portrait of his work.

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Marcello Velho’s Graphic Kingdom

I’m really enjoying the bit mapped illustrations and designs of Marcello Velho A.K.A Kingdom. His stacked illustrations look like unexplored levels of 1980’s video games that one would play while taking massive amounts of acid.

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Meghan Brady

Colors and shapes run wild in Meghan Brady‘s abstract paintings. To look at her work is to feel like Alice, tumbling head first down the kaleidoscopic rabbit hole.

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Interview: Katherine Sherwood

 

 

 

Katherine Sherwood creates sumptuous paintings that visualize, in a lyrical and esoteric fashion, the age old metaphysical concerns of the body, life after death, and the tenuous relationship between art and science. Sherwood’’s works exhibit a Buddhist, Zen-like approach to color, form and composition, elegantly balanced and unafraid of both dense areas of joyous, swirling patterns and passages of silent, empty space. Just below the seemingly abstract planes is a latent structure of corporeal diagrams, such as angiograms, brittle tree-like linear nerve endings, and mystical Solomon’s seal, lending the paintings a religious, even ecstatic talisman-like quality. 

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Nico Ordozgoiti Brings Renaissance Statues To Life With Hyperrealistic Painting

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In the series Paint Job, Spanish art director Nico Ordozgoiti infuses some color onto Renaissance statues. He digitally paints them in a hyperrealistic style and brings them to life. Iconic sculptures like David and Venus de Milo are now fair-skinned with chestnut brown hair instead of their usual off-white exterior. The visual effect is similar to the colorization of  black-and-white photographs, and Ordozgoiti’s vibrant colors are offset by a gray base.

Ordozgoti writes, “When Renaissance masters discovered and copied the hyper-realistic sculptures of ancient Greek and Rome, they didn’t know that some of these works had originally been painted to make them even more life-like.Ultraviolet light reveals how these pieces really look. He goes on to explain, “This made me think about how adding color to classic and neoclassical sculptures could give us an interesting look at what some of those artists might have had in mind.” (Via Ufunk)

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