Get Social:

Bianca Chang’s Minimal Sculptures Made From Hand Cut Sheets Of Paper

Bianca Chang lives and works in Sydney, Australia. Using only a surgical knife and stacked paper she creates minimal geometric forms. Hundreds of sheets are stacked, hand-plotted, and cut until a sculptural object remains. Works change dramatically depending on what is removed and what is left behind. Some of the blocks achieve depth by the digging out of shapes while others rely on protrusion. The stark white of the paper allows subtleties and gradients to appear in the form of shadows.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Elisabeth Lecourt’s Dresses Made Out Of Antique Maps

Elisabeth Lecourt is a multidisciplinary artist who lives and works in London. Her newest body of work is entitled Les robes geographiques in which delicate dresses are constructed out of antique maps. In her own words the series acts as “a portrait of people through their clothes, like a blue-print of their soul.” Her bio explains the importance of the female figure in her art: “Sensitivity and vulnerability are the main subjects in the work of the artist…the feminine figure is seen like the spine of her house, like an essential component of this particular world.” (via)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Funwunce

Creative collective Funwunce brings together a group of talented artists from various genres to create mind bending artwork for your needy eyeballs. Some of my favorite works on their site has to be their album art and prints which seemlessly blend analog and digital skills for you to enjoy.

Currently Trending

Thousands of Suspended Balls Create Bitmap Color Grid

I’m absolutely loving Nike Savvas’ brilliant installation Atomic: Full Of Love, Full Of Love which is created with thousands of suspended
bouncy balls organized in a hyperspectrum of colors. Created in 2005 this piece is a rainbow-brite labryinth of color that I’d love to get lost in for hours and hours. (via colosal & jobs wife)

 

Currently Trending

Dawn Woolley’s Unusual Self-Portraits Address Female Stereotypes

Dawn Woolley Dawn Woolley Dawn Woolley Dawn Woolley

Dealing in an atypical kind of self-portraiture, Dawn Woolley often creates photographic copies of herself, and then photographs them in various locations, positions and moods.  Making herself a substitute and her visual representative, the work forms an inquiry into the act of looking, and being looked at.  As she says of the work, “Referring to psychoanalysis and phenomenology I examine my own experience of becoming an object of sight and also consider the experience the viewer has when looking at me as a photographic object. By producing artwork that establishes me as an object it could be argued that I reinforce stereotypical images of the female body.”  Indeed, the female body is a common subject of Woolley’s work, often playing with stereotypes through reinforcing them, or defying them.

In series, such as The Substitute, Woolley created a photographic copy of herself and placed it in the real world in her stead.  Seeking to reinforce conventional images of the female body, but with apparent exhibitionism, Woolley created a replacement that rendered her real body invisible.  The sense of disbelief for a viewer is slow to materialize, as our brain wants to see an actual 3-dimensional person.  The effects are similar even when both individuals are cutouts.  Selecting moments in her past, Woolley’s series, Adolescence gives her some distance from emotionally heightened events by re-creating them using photographs.

The ambiguousness of her work allows Woolley to play with assumptions about gender, and conventions of photography.  There is a performative aspect to the work that is ultimately completed by the viewer.  A viewer feels like a voyeur, and then, after realizing he is looking at a 2-dimensional depiction of a 2-dimensional photograph, a fool for being duped.  An interesting way to examine gender roles and self-portraiture, Woolley’s images are challenging and provocative.

Currently Trending

Michael Craig-Martin’s Wall Paintings Transform Everyday Objects Into The Extraordinary

craig-martin_installation1craig-martin_installation9craig-martin_installation8craig-martin_installation11

Michael Craig-Martin has been creating art since the 1960s. His wall painting installations from the 1990s and 2000s feel current with their bright colors and flat appearance, but some of the items in the paintings, ubiquitous at the time they were captured, are now relics. Among the shoes and pails rendered in black tape outlines are Nokia style cell phones and milk bottles. That doesn’t diminish the charm of these installations. Craig-Martin’s intent was to make these works in a generic style, even attempting to erase his personality from the works by using tape as outlines instead of pencil drawings. It didn’t work. The purposeful non-style of painted mass-produced items executed meticulously in a vibrant palette at enlarged scale has become one of Craig-Martin’s signatures. The choice of everyday objects for his wall installations was a purposeful one.

“I thought the objects we value least because they were ubiquitous were actually the most extraordinary. … I wanted people to realise how extraordinary everyday objects are, and think about what image-making is. The impulse was never nostalgia, kitsch or a critique of consumerism.” (Source)

Photos of the installations can only capture part of their impact. Walking around a corner only to be confronted with an enormous pink desk lamp is part of the experience, as are the shifting views of eyeglasses and belts through the arches of a candy-colored room. Only when standing next to a seven-foot extinguisher can the scale of the articles be truly appreciated.

Though he is often called a conceptual artist, Craig-Martin prefers to be called radical. It’s not just about the concept for him—the making that comes from the idea is equally important. “Throughout his career, through work in many different media, he has explored the expressive potential of commonplace objects and images.”

Currently Trending

Nishio Yasuyuki’s Giant Women

I’m loving Nishio Yasuyuki’s massive sculptures of women. They are bizarre grotesque shrines to to horror films and nightmarish manga stories.

Currently Trending

Paintings Inspired By The Perception And Misconception Of Middle America

Lori Larusso - Painting Lori Larusso - Painting Lori Larusso - Painting

As traditional Middle America and the housing market continues to breakdown, its imagery on the television or in advertising seems to persist, with an eerie commercialized flatness. It is here, in this strange space, where artist Lori Larusso’s work finds its stride.

Of her paintings, Larusso explains: “I am interested in exploring the unavoidable contradictions which exist in our personal (and collective) systems of belief, by pointing to the complexity of individual situations. Very often, our ideals are a reflection of the way we wish things were, rather than a product of the way we actually experience them. I find this conflict to be in direct connection to the representational image.”

Currently Trending