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Nicholas Hanna’s Marvelous Bubble Machine Is A Work Of Wonder

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At first glance, media artist Nicholas Hanna‘s installation looks like some kind of DIY gallows. It’s sparsely constructed: just wood and string set before a simple $20 table fan. Below the string, a tray filled with liquid soap — death by Mr. Clean, perhaps?

Then the machine kicks into gear, dipping the string into the soap, drawing it up slowly, and suddenly an iridescent bubble blooms out of nothing. Magic.

Hanna works seem to incorporate one part engineering and two parts childhood wonder. One of his other pieces is a Beijing tricycle that, as the rider pedals, uses water droplets to write Chinese calligraphy in Courier New. Another piece utilizes motion sensors to cause a cascade of light depending on how a candle flame is shielded by a hand. And another still is a long gunmetal trumpet mounted on a toy truck, labeled simply as “Fire Truck #1.” What does the fire truck do? It starts sounding the alarms at 7:30 p.m., of course.

The bubble machine — “Bubble Device #1,” naturally — is another one of these curiosities. It’s unusual to see beautiful bubbles created by something as sterile as Hanna’s spare framed machine, in an environment as austere as a plain white-walled room. But the wonder is still there.

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Ivo van der Bent, “Think of Me” series

I really like how the isolation of the object and their illumination by the camera give the plants human characteristics- those not getting any love. The ones in our office are slowly resembling these :[

Visit the Ivo van der Bent’s to see more of his work.

 

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Jennifer Loeber Photographs Her Dead Mother’s Belongings To Cope With Her Grief

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When photographer Jennifer Loeber’s mother died, Loeber began to photograph her belongs as a way of coping with her grief. She matched her photos with vintage pictures that her father had taken of her mother and posted the pairs on Instagram. The resulting series, “Left Behind,” is a poignant memorial, both deeply personal and universal.

The everyday objects that remain when loved one dies become an instant museum of sorts, freezing that person in time. A favorite pearl ring will never be replaced by a diamond; an unmatched glove will never be matched to its mate. A used lipstick, valueless in itself, becomes a cherished object, chosen and applied by the person so missed. Many times these everyday objects are the most touching and the most difficult to dispose of.

“I found myself deeply overwhelmed by the need to keep even the most mundane of my Mom’s belongings when she died suddenly this past February. Instead of providing comfort and good memories they became a source of deep sadness and anxiety and I knew the only way I would be able to move past that was to focus on a way to interact with them cathartically. I had recently become active on Instagram and realized that utilizing the casual aspects of sharing on the app was a way to diminish my own sentimentality towards the objects my Mom left behind.”

Reframing the objects allowed Loeber to experience them without searing grief. Instead of the items feeling haunted, they became imbued by fond memories of her mother’s life. By matching them with her father’s photos she was able to make a fitting memorial to her mother, one that was less about personal pain than about remembrance.

“My dad refused to hold a traditional funeral service because he and I believe you should celebrate a life, not mourn it. I’m sure this body of work falls in line with that concept.” (Source)

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Steve Jobs Cheese Head Supreme

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Chef Ken has taken Mac Fanboy-dom and food sculptural likenesses to a…ahem…cheesy new level. Savor the delights of Steve Jobs head on an appetizer platter, in a sizzling plate of “iPad Thai” or in a festive nacho concoction.  A big ghastly when his head melts all over the chips. I can’t really say much more.

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Book 1: Supernaturalism Available

We just put up 50 copies of Beautiful/Decay Book:1 Supernaturalism on our online shop. We have a limited supply of these available for our shop so if you didn’t subscribe this will be one of the only ways to get the book. Enjoy!

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Annegret Soltau Creates Delicate Line Drawings On Her Face With Thread

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Thread used as a mean to draw. German artist Annegret Soltau traces her face and body with a linear thread. Joining the eyes, nose and mouth to create a web that’s structured in different shapes. Some of the webs are harmonized with the face, others are claustrophobic. The artist is posing herself, claiming that “I am using myself as a model because I can go the farthest with me.”

The tension of the thread is an analogy to the relationships she encountered with her family members in her childhood. The strenuous connection with her mother and the heavy absence of her missing father added to a grandmother forcing her to knit instead of doing the things she liked, weighed on her ability to cope with emotional strain. She admits that without her isolated past she couldn’t have followed the path of art.

The result is a series of portraits questioning the meaning of metamorphosis. Annegret Soltau’s method is intriguing and captivating but her focus is on the result. Her art acts as a deliverance.
In the video below this article, we witness her expression while the thread is wrapped around her face. We wonder if she is feeling torture or a painful pleasure. It’s a process close to self-mutilation. Releasing energy by pulling the thread on her face marks a renewal, the abandonment of negative emotions. (via INAG).

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Sound Of Decay: Kyary Pamyu Pamyu’s Ponponpon

 Kyary Pamyu Pamyu is a model, blogger, and apparently a musician from Tokyo Japan. I have no idea what she’s singing but I’m praying to the Hello Kitty gods that the lyrics are as completely crazy and bizarre as this video is.Each frame of the video is full of candy coated everything, flying slices of toast, giant tongues, and all sorts of other things that are just to weird to explain. Watch the full video in all it’s Harajuku, kawaii, and decora madness after the jump.

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The Clay Street Art of MRtoll

Street art has undergone some interesting developments of late.  While not entirely forsaking its aerosol heritage, street art has definitely become more adventuresome in terms of medium in the past few years.  Artist MRtoll exemplifies this well.  While MRtoll’s aesthetic may resemble that of a stencil or poster artist, his medium is a bit more peculiar: clay.  MRtoll works the clay into various images or texts then installs them on walls throughout Brooklyn.  He often uses his clay in a nearly painterly manner creating impressive two dimensional work.  Other times, his work is text based, seemingly a text or a tweet, playful much like its medium.

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