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Rebecca Glover’s Sinister Installations

British artist Rebecca Glover works in several mediums, but it’s her installations that are especially striking.  The three installations pictured here – Space Invader, Flat 51, and The Inhabitant – invades the insides of an apartment and galleries.  The calming, almost mesmerizing, color of the spikes clash against the installation’s overall sinister nature.  She describes the installation in interview:

“I had an idea to create a sculpture that broke through the space and played with this idea that there’s something latent in the walls; playing around with what lies beyond what you can see.” [via]

The second series of photos are taken from the Market Estate Project in which seventy-five artists worked with residents to install art in a soon to be demolished housing estate in London.  The work and apartment buildings were destroyed the very next day following the art’s installation.

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Eiffel Tower Rip-Offs

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The Eiffel Tower was built in 1889 and by the very next year it had several admirers in neighbors across the channel.  Some saw the potential of a similar tower, a “Great Tower for London”.  These illustrations are part of a catalog of competitive designs for the proposed tower released the following year.  Some are hilariously derivative of the still brand new tower.  Others, on the other hand, seem to belong to some sort of Victorian space-age.  Regardless, in a strange way all of the designs seem to point to the importance and uniqueness of the original Eiffel tower, even at this very early age.

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Prisoner Creates Epic Mural Out Of Bedsheets, Hair Gel, And Newspapers As a Meditation On Heaven, Hell, And Redemption

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Artist Jesse Krimes stands in front of his 39-panel mural Apokaluptein:16389067 (federal prison bed sheets, transferred New York Times images, color pencil) installed, here, at the Olivet Church Artist Studios, Philadelphia. January, 2014.

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In 2009, Jesse Krimes (yes that is his real name) was sentenced to 70 months in a federal penitentiary for cocaine possession and intent to distribute. The judge sentenced Jesse to a minimum security prison in New Jersey, close to support network of friends and family, but the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP) opted to send him to a medium security facility in Butner, North Carolina.

His way of coping with the life-changing sentence went a bit more differently than you would expect. He got by with a little help from federal prison bed sheets, hair gel, The New York Times, and some color pencils. Although money was limited in prison, he never struggled to gather enough money to purchase these objects. You might be thinking these are random, but, in fact, they are what made prison life a somewhat more passable experience.

While experimenting with these four materials, Krimes discovered that he could transfer the newspaper images onto the prison bedsheets. At first he used water to do this, but that did not work. Hair gel, on the other hand, had the requisite viscosity to do the job. He was not aware that three years after, he would end up with a 39-panel mural. Each transfer took 30-minutes. Thousands make up the mural. Krimes only worked on one bed-sheet at a time, each of them matching the size of the tabletop he worked on. The laborious routine kept Krimes sane, focused and disciplined.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Light Bulb Music

Not sure if I would categorize Michael Vorfeld’s performance as “music” but it’s an interesting installation incorporating sound & light.

On another note It might be taboo to say this but I find it hard for myself to get into noise art or noise music in general. What do you guys think? Is noise just noise or more?

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Pinched, Pulled And Crumpled Wood Sculptures From Cha Jong-Rye

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The work of Korean artist Cha Jong-Rye looks like anything but wood.  Her large pieces hang on the wall as if they were draped cloth, strange liquids, and geological formations.  Her peculiar choice of medium undoubtedly references these and other ideas of nature and the home.  She painstakingly carves her work from wood, often from hundreds of small pieces.  She seems to crumple, pinch, and pull a material that’s especially rigid, typically found as a tree or house.  They’re temptingly tactile – if no one in the gallery noticed I’d nearly be enticed to drag my fingers across their surface. [via]

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Frank Magnotta’s Absurdist And Surreal Pencil Drawings Inspired By Americana

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Frank Magnotta- Graphite

Frank Magnotta- Graphite

Frank Magnotta- Graphite

Graphite artist Frank Magnotta creates absurdist Americana-inspired images that are heavily saturated with symbolic elements and a farcical outlook on the modern world. Magnotta’s work is strongly influenced by pop culture and the attributes of branding; he has referenced magazines such as Time and Self in his work, and phrases such as Take Off Your Mask and Century 21 come from brand identities that he was intrigued by. Magnotta recognizes the significance of pop culture on his drawings:

I think you can tell by my drawings that it is a big influence. I’d have to say it is an inevitable influence on our daily lives whether we like it or not. I think pop culture is a double edged sword, it gives and it takes too. I’m not interested in pure pop, but dirty pop, pop that has been consumed and processed by the individual. I think that is more intriguing.”

Some of his drawings involve structures made of their elements: the rough shape of the United States comprised of detailed words and media logos. Yet he has a lot of crude portraits that, from afar, are recognizable, and up close gain another layer of meaning:

I had been working on the mega-structures for a bit and wanted to invert the process. What if the logos and graphics made individuals that would inhabit the structures? For each portrait in the series I collected logos from a different societal institutions. So, the “Bank Dick” is constructed from financial logos, and “The Diagnosis” is comprised of morphed medical logos. “The Bank Dick” is also the great title of a W.C. Fields movie. On a personal note, for some reason I think that drawing is the closest thing to a self portrait I’ve done. Maybe it is the bugged out look in his eyes. I’m keeping that one for my personal collection.”

Magnotta was previously featured in Beautiful/Decay’s Book 1: Supernaturalism.

(Excerpt from Source

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Hilarious Baby Pictures Recreated By Adults

My Precious Moments

My Precious Momentsmy precious moments

Everyone gets annoyed by the bombardment of photos of babies on Facebook and other Social networking sites. It seems like parents want to document every smile, fall and giggle that their kids make. But what about the rest of us that don’t have kids? Well a few fun loving folks in NYC decided to fight fire with fire and create My Precious Roommate, a hilarious collection of photos taken by Molly (we only have her first name) of her roommate recreating the good, the bad, the cute, and the ugly baby photos that we all come across on Facebook. The images are somewhere between comedy skit, performance art, and too much time on their hands. We love them for their ingenuity and creative take on G rated imagery.

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B/D Apparel Sneak Peak

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We’re gearing up B/D Apparel for another season of collaborations with artists from around the world. It might seem like we just send our the art for the shirts to the printers and wait for them to ship us finished shirts but that’s far from the truth! We spend weeks camped out at our printers fine tuning every single shirt. The process can be grueling with some shirts taking an entire day just to get right. Here are some shots from a recent day at the printer….

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