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Wasma Mansour’s Documents The Rarely Seen Lives Of Saudi Arabian Women

Wasma Mansour - Photograph

Wasma Mansour - Photograph
  Wasma Mansour - Photograph

Wasma Mansour - Photograph

Wasma Mansour decided to document single Saudi Arabian women (living in the UK and Saudi Arabia) for her PhD thesis. She knew this was a subject that interested her due to its lack of coverage. She found there was a lack of investigation of women on their own, far too often women were measured with male counterparts; spouses, partners.

At first Mansour reached out using facebook and email, phishing randomly. She found this didn’t yield enough results. She found that making a more personal connection with the women, unsurprisingly, had them trust her more readily. Both the fact that the work was being done for educational purposes, and that Mansour herself was single, had the women open up to Mansour more enthusiastically. According to Mansour, they identified with her approach and saw that she could truly understand their lifestyle. Her subjects were in school themselves in Saudi Arabia and the UK.

Interestingly, Mansour had her large-scale film developed in the UK. This was in part because there were not many labs that were able to process her film in Saudi Arabia, but also because she found negotiating autonomously on a daily basis was very challenging. This being exactly the type of theme Mansour sought to confront in her work. (Via Emaho Magazine)

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Brandon Muir’s Moving Collages Are What Nightmares Are Made Of

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Artist Brandon Muir creates dark, creepy, digital collages. With creatures such as a vintage pilot whose nose seems to have been burned off, a smiling blue child with red melting eyes, and a boy with a mutated head including a third eye complete with tentacle arms, Brandon Muir’s potential patrons of hell are truly what nightmares are made of. They are reminiscent of The Twilight Zone meets The Munsters meets Basket Case (1982). They are undoubtedly demonic, however, the work also has this sense of playfulness (perhaps solely because they are displayed using the lighthearted platform of the GIF). Muir’s work has an of aura of jest, perhaps taking notes from the type of kitsch found in 1950s horror films. In his own words “[My] one intention with these animations is to ride the line between a disgusted cringe and a smooth chunky chuckle” (source). His process begins as any collage artist’s would — he collects images taken from magazines such as National Geographic and LIFE magazine. After he creates his more traditional collages, he then uses programs such as Photoshop and AfterEffects to formulate the digital rendering. By placing the work into a digital format, Muir allows himself to explore more complex textures, colors, and juxtapositions, creating striking images you can’t seem to get off your mind. (Via The Creators Project)

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Beautiful/Decay Is Santa Approved!

This holiday season give the gift of creativity with a year long subscription to Beautiful/Decay. Your loved ones will not only will get a limited edition art print with each book, but they will also receive a beautifully designed, hand numbered book, chock full of inspirational art from the best creative minds.

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Awesome Video Of The Day: Spiritual Synthesis

 

It’s another Monday and my head is a bit foggy. Everytime I close my eyes this video plays inside my head. I wonder what it means? Video by Graham Dorey , Music by Prince Rama of Ayodhya .

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Tsherin Sherpa’s Contemporary Twist On Tibetan Thangka Paintings

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Tsherin Sherpa, born in Kathmandu Nepal, originally trained as a traditional Tibetan thangka painter with his father Master Urgen Dorje. From the age of twelve, he underwent six years of intensive training before travelling to Taiwan to study Mandarin and computer science. Since then he has returned to thangka painting but has added a contemporary twist to the traditional paintings leaving behind the traditional confines of the age old practice. His work now mixes the techniques and imagery of thangka with contemporary subject matter.

When asked about breaking from tradition Sherpa states:

“Sometimes if one gets too obsessed with the rules, there’s a danger of getting entangled in that very obsession.  We then become more concerned about not breaking the rule. Because of that, from the traditional art’s point of view, the contemporary work with Buddhist imagery may even get categorized as sacriligious. I am working with some of the images that are viewed as the ultimate portrayal of certain deity. And to manipulate it, is obviously taboo.

However, if we scratch the layer a little deeper, and analyze these Buddhist images, one will find that they are a means to develop a practitioner’s (Buddhist) goal towards enlightenment, which means that the images are not the ultimate goal but rather a vehicle. A representation of a Buddha in 2- or 3-dimensional form is not the actual Buddha. It is a mere representation. And to fall into the trap of perceiving them to be the ultimate, is actually getting oneself entangled with the rules.”

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Joe Davidson’s Monochromatic Floral Sculptures

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flower sculptures

sculptures

Joe Davidson creates beautiful sculptures from plaster sunflowers.  Devoid of color, the hanging bouquets look as though they could be bones, bleached coral, or some other organic form drained of life.  The Los Angeles-based artist is interested in repetition.  A tradition based in Minimalism—repeating the same form over and over again—Davidson’s flowers are less about Minimalism and more about material.  Davidson is interested in allowing an idea to be driven by the inherent quality and symbolism of the material used.  Through the similar plaster casts (all are cast by hand), Davidson is creating shadows of the original.  The mass production generates an effect whereby individual elements become part of a uniform, monochromatic whole.

Davidson strives to allow viewers to consider that which surrounds us; he wants to show beauty in the mundane and the individual within the mass.  Subtle yet stunning, Davidson’s floral sculptures are like three-dimensional still lives, conceptually engaging and visually appealing.

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Izhar Gafni’s $20 Cardboard Bicycle

Israeli inventor Izhar Gafni recently developed a bicycle that is pretty amazing in a lot of different ways. Not only is it made out of cardboard, it’s sustainable, durable, functional, super light, looks like a bike, and only costs 9$ to produce, which means he can sell it for $20 a piece. Everything about it is amazing. Not the least of which is his inspiring determination to realize such a seemingly impossible idea. I’m really crossing my fingers that this goes into mega production and opens some doors for a lot of people who wouldn’t otherwise have access to the wonderful world of bicycles and transportation. Watch the video after the jump to see his process; it’s a real day-maker.( via )

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Evan Meister

Evan Meister‘s drawings have a certain Old New York feel to them- a dark past (or future) referenced through shrewd hieroglyphs. I always find myself trying to read his work like a comic strip in an unknown language- where the punchline is Evan’s perfect balance of technical skill and engaging originality.

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