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Dead Woman’s Possessions Poignantly Brought Back To Life In 2-Minute Video

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In 2010, Gemma Green-Hope’s grandmother died; scanning a flimsy memorial service program, the illustrator desired a more intimate way to remember her grandmother. After inheriting her beloved relative’s old possessions, she animated them in search of traces of permanence left behind by a mortal soul. In this stop-motion video, titled Gan Gan, viewers see an entire life literally flash before our eyes; both mundane and exquisite objects are transformed into momento mori, as if we ourselves were at the moment of our death.

The whimsical, nostalgic animation elegantly draws upon literary and artistic themes of womanhood, so that in the wake of Gan Gan’s passing, a fertile, creative and distinctly feminine presence remains unharmed. Green-Hope recites the “Eternal Father, Strong to Save” hymn, a poem associated both with funerals and the sea. The sea remains a theme throughout the entire short film, and bodies of water are often seen as female, powerful, penetrable yet containing mysterious depths. The countryside, fairies, and the hearth—all iconographically seen as the woman—skip mirthfully in and out of the video. Left with the shot a books written about the sea, pulsating like waves, viewers are encouraged to see the matrilineal thread as something permanent and endlessly magical.

For Green-Hope, the cosmic and the personal are intertwined; amidst religious and natural icons, we see photographs that are poignantly unique to the deceased. Similarly, we are told in Gree-Hope’s sing-song voice specific things like “she rode a blue bicycle” and “she once shot a spider.” Unlike the mortal life, this video can be played over and over, forever preserving a memory that might otherwise fade away. (via Colossal)

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Celebrity Nipple Slips Turned Into Probing Works Of Art

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The now-infamous Playboy image later re-appropriated by Shinji

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For his project “Nipple,” the multimedia artist Shinji Murakami approaches female eroticism in an unexpected way, creating 8-bit images from photographs of Janet Jackson’s Superbowl “nip-slip,” Paris Hilton’s breast-baring bikini, and Kim Kardashian’s Playboy images. In constructing the pixilated images, the artist focuses solely on a tiny square area of each celebrity’s nipple.

In bringing the erogenous zone into the digital age, Shinji paradoxically desexualizes this part of the female body; while the original images are intended to be or considered to arousing, the blown-up nipple’s abstract, geometric pixel patterns inspire no erotic response. In this way, the work might be seen as a brutal reminder that, try as it might, digital media cannot stand in for true sexual intimacy.

Or perhaps “Nipple” is an unsettling prophecy: as we rely more upon technology, this series represents a more modern “sexy.” Erotic images of women’s bodies are becoming more accessible and more mass-produced; the video game industry, whose advanced technology serves as Shinji’s inspiration, has been criticized for its objectification of women. “Nipple” is that idea taken to the extreme; in these works, these female subjects are reduced to a single body part, and in turn, that body part is pixelated and transformed into an utterly dehumanized abstraction.

That is not to say that the images don’t contain beauty; in fact, the simplicity of their geometric form spotlights lovely hues. Each woman’s flesh becomes a digital tapestry of unexpected color variances. Like a modern take on the work of French Impressionists, “Nipple” precisely examines and deconstructs its subjects into tiny sections; here, in the place of a heavy brushstroke, is a pixel. What do you think of this conceptual take on the cultural connotations of the female body? Is it offensive or refreshing?

Take a look at more of Shinji’s brilliant and fun pixilated, video game-inspired work below! (via Spoon & TamagoShinji Murakami, and Game Scenes)

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Tim Hobbelman Sculpts Futuristic-Looking Animals Out Of Discarded Electronics

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In a collection called Animaux, Netherlands-based artist Tim Hobbelman has been sculpting animals out of discarded electrical appliances, sourcing his materials from junk stores. Look closely at each creature and you will see objects such as hair dryers, headphones, and a Dustbuster, all fused together in the likeness of eyes, snouts, and wings. His strange (and slightly creepy) menagerie currently showcases a deer, bear, and wild boar, among others. Each piece captures the physical details of the individual animals, while also infusing them with an unsettling, cyborg-like appearance.

Hobbelman’s Animaux are not only clever in the skill it takes to recreate animal anatomy with electronic parts, but it is also a creative recycling practice. Non-biodegradable trash that will either be thrown into a landfill or left to gather dust on a junk shop shelf is reanimated with new life—a comment, perhaps, on the effects that such obsolescent, discarded technology has on the environment.

Hobbelman hopes to create more Animaux, so be sure to check out his Facebook page and support his work. He is also taking part in the Born as an Artist exhibition on December 18th at Instinct One in Tilburg. (Via Junkculture)

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Troels Carlsen’s Vivisection And Torture

Copenhagen based Troels Carlsen has some beautifully brutal work dealing with imagery of death, torture, and vivisection.

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JONNY NEGRON – NSFW

This Thanksgiving, let us be grateful for the delicious imagery of “the master of voluptuousness” Jonny Negron. Not since Tom of Finland have I witnessed this caliber of graphic plumpness, and once your eyes fall upon these beauties you’ll be hooked. I really wish those two dudes could collaborate, unfortunately Tom of Finland is dead, but luckily, Negron and Jesse Balmer collaborate often, yielding plenty of awesome finishes. You can catch both of these men in CHAMELEON and DEMON GOD GOBLIN HEAVEN, and after that check out Jonny while he flicks, tumbles, and sells wonderful shit at these hyperlinks. Do enjoy.

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Mindo Cikanavicius’ Comedic Series “Bubbleissimo” Questions The Meaning Of Masculinity

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New York based artist Mindo Cikanavicius photographs portraits of men with foam “facial hair.” Within this series, titled Bubbleissimo, (perhaps making a play on the word “machismo”), the artist distorts the notion of masculinity through a comedic display of the growing obsession with groomed facial hair. His work aims to speak about the fragility and absurdity of what “manliness” means, depicting it as being just as allusive and indefinite as the bubbles meant to represent it.  These works portray the sitters in a sort of kitschy, glamor portrait style, engulfed in one side of sky blue and one side of bubble gum pink, the colors used to denote gendered objects. His series mocks the need to define and portray what it means to be masculine, and, through what seems at first glance to be an overtly serious series, successfully, upon further inspection, invites in a air of making fun of itself. Once it becomes clear that this facial hair is in fact made of bubbles, the work switches from being a strange cataloging of men, to a witty depiction of gender norms. His artist statement notes that “Mindo is focused creating story based unexpected moments with touch of cinematic drama, humor and mystery. His work is a blend of ideas, imagination, observations, experiences and emotions into making intriguing constructed reality photographs.”

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Wet Paint Grant Recipient: Derek Albeck

Derek Albeck has a magical way of transforming the ordinary into the extraordinary. Using only pencils, a bit of paint, and masterfully honed traditional portrait techniques, Albeck creates pieces that are anything but traditional.

Frequently working from snapshots taken in his daily life, Albeck amplifies the expressions and motions of his subjects, revealing the completely comfortable, unguarded, and usually hilariously unflattering parts of ourselves that manifest most intensely in candid photos taken seconds too soon, or when chemically compromised. In fact, much of Albeck’s work is characterized by a sort of “magic brownie effect,” turning mundane, common symbols, people, and objects into mesmerizing sources of irresistible humor. His eye for details — like the logo on a beer can, the crinkle of a flag, or the cover of a book by Aleister Crowley – capture escapist fantasies, moments of carefree bliss and rebellion that appear at once precious but fleeting, intensely personal but universally familiar. In Albeck’s world, a pile of dirty laundry becomes an eerily expressive smiley face, a cheeky rainbow forms the frown of an aptly titled “Sad Murderer,” and a skull with hypnotic eyes, comprised of the floating heads of the happiest, goofiest people you’ve ever seen, leaves you giggling in a trance-like state for hours. This happiness proves contagious as you find yourself smiling back at the bearded, flannel-clad man collapsed in a joyful stupor beneath a rainbow in a drawing called “Have a Great Day Forever.” And with an attitude that makes us want to do just that, Albeck’s work provides a fresh viewpoint with which to view, and laugh at, everyday life.

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Roya Hamburger

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Stunning work by the artist Roya Hamburger.

More abstract work after the jump.

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