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Miran Kim’s Boy In The Water

Miran Kim has some interesting narrative paintings with a slight surreal bent.

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Alexis Facca’s 3D Spaces Appear Like Two-Dimensional Graphics In “The Flat” Project

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Latest collaboration between paper and set designer Alexis Facca and photographer Tom Joye transforms three dimensional spaces to look like flat, two dimensional paintings. With the creative use of angle and perspective, Facca and Joye were able to obtain the desired illusion and deceive the viewer’s eye.

The Flat Project actually features a miniature 1 x 1 meter set made from paper but in 3D. Seems like the set was flipped and turned to create images from various angles. Without knowing, it is hard to tell which is the floor or ceiling. Here’s an explanation by Facca on two of her creations:

“For example in the first image the red is the ground, the wood a wall on left and blue is in the foreground. On the second image (below) the ground is made with wood and the red.”

(via mocoloco)

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Amy Sarkisian’s Underwear wearing Spheres & Ikea Wood Inlay

Off beat humor is a running theme throughout the sculptures and drawings of Los Angeles artist Amy Sarkisian. In one piece a  giant geometric sphere is wearing an equally massive pair of underwear. In another series cheap Ikea furniture is embellished with lavish patterning using inexpensive adhesive vinyl to replicate high end wood inlay.  Regardless of image or material, comedy weaves its way in and out of Sarkisian’s imagery both through choice of material and concept.

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Lorenzo Durantini’s Brooding Installations Made From VHS Tapes

Lorenzo Durantini uses VHS tapes and the tape within to create large brooding towers and installations. When rolls of video tape cover the floor a dark sea containing hours and hours of video threatens to swallow the room. One installation consists of 2,216 tapes placed in a stack. The resulting structure is both a homage to a dead format and a brooding reflection on how we consume only to eventually disregard. Elswhere he utilizes photographic material to construct new forms. Durantini’s work reminds us that technology is perpetually transforming and what was once cutting edge will always end up a relic.

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Rebecca Drolen’s Photographs Of Hair Explore Death And Femininity In Striking New Ways

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In Hair Pieces, the photographer Rebecca Drolen examines the relationship between human beings and our hair, highlighting the impulse to deem body hair beautiful or strange. Inspired by what she calls the “archival” power of hair to outlive the rest of the human body, Drolen engages with hair pieces in comical and yet starkly emotional narratives. In the striking series, human hair transforms from ornamentation to elixir to parasite, creating a poignant work that elevates the mundane to the transcendent.

With clever titles like Hair Tie and Ear Hair, Drolen’s images read in part as a modern take on 1960s feminist photography; her carefully staged self-portraits are shot in black and white, revealing the rich grays of her vintage garments, retro decor, and and outdated shears. The home serves as the backdrop to the artist’s exploration of a more domestic femininity. In turn, the luxurious tresses and the house engage in both harmonious and conflicting dialogues: expertly styled hair dresses the windows in one image, yet in another, it uncontrollably discharges from the bathtub drain.

In her apparent nod to both women’s and photographic history, Drolen addresses the association between hair and death, or the ability of hair to document and catalog human existence. Hair fills the medicine cabinet as if promising to cure disease; it covers a foggy, indefinitely seen window to a mysterious space beyond. Like relics of years gone by, hair hangs on a wall, labeled and numbered by tally marks. Without a hint of sentimentality, a pair of shears and a head of hair lay side by side on a cleared out bed, evocative of an individual’s absence and passing. Take a look. (via Lenscratch)

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Tom Lynall’s Tiny Intricate Pencil Carvings Of Emojis And Pop Culture Symbols Are So Small You Can Barely See Them

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The art of pencil carving is becoming more and more widespread, intricate, and skilled. Over the past few years we have come to see many incredible things being carved from the humble pencil. Whether it is colored, or plain graphite, a leaden tip can be transformed into many icons, symbols or dioramas. Artist Tom Lynall‘s effort sees him shaping pencil tips into emojis, tiny characters and landscapes. From an artist’s paint palette, to idyllic pastoral views, to Rapunzel in her tower, to the hearts, lightning bolts and happy faces from our smart phones, Lynall is capable of achieving great detail on a minute scale.

A bespoke jeweler by trade, Lynall is no stranger to working at this level, or at the pace required to finish a delicate piece. But only having started his pencil carving hobby last November, he is quickly adapting to his new material. Being malleable and dense, graphite is an ideal material to carve intricate and complicate details into. He says about his new time consuming hobby:

I love art but I have never been able to draw so this is a good way for me to create things with the limitations of my skill. The main tool I use is the scalpel blade shown in the pictures as well as a few pins which I have altered the end of to give me different blades.
This is great fun to do so if you would like to give it a go the best advice I can give is to not get annoyed when they break, they are extremely fragile but once your done they are fantastically satisfying. (Source)

For more amazing miniature sculptures made from the lead and wood of pencils or even crayons, see the work of artists Salavat Fidai, Dalton Ghetti, and Diem Chau. (Via Design Boom)

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B/D Apparel Announces: Artist Shirt Of The Month!

Each month, Beautiful/Decay will release a new shirt on the Beautiful/Decay shop before they hit any retail stores. The shirts will be printed in unique color ways in a select print run of just 300 shirts. Oh, and did we mention that we’ll be giving you a 33% discount off retail prices, pricing them at just $20 a shirt?

 

Here’s a rundown of the B/D monthly shirt release:

 

– Available in advance before the season ships to retailers
– Unique color way printed in a select run of 300 shirts
– 33% discount off retail price, at just $20 a shirt

 

First Release “Lost Face” by Vladimir (Waldez) Snegotskiy aka Ctrl-V


Vladimir Sengotskiy creates his hypercolor fantasmagoric creations in multi-media, ranging from print, web, motion and beyond. His recent design for Beautiful/Decay apparel is a neo-neon medusa’s head mask, seething with bright purple, yellow, blue and brown snakes and line confetti. Carnival masques meets facepaint!

CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE LOST FACE!

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Hannalie Taute’s Embroiders Beautifully Fractured Portraits Stitched On Car Tires

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Using discarded inner tubes and a needle and thread, South African artist Hannalie Taute embroiders portraits onto rubber. She takes cuts the abandoned material and cuts them apart to stitch together and form a “canvas.” Often, this means that her subjects have a subtle honeycomb pattern as their backdrop. “Besides the durability and availability of rubber from inner tubes found in car tires, I also decided to embroider on rubber because I find the contrast of working with needle and thread on these inner tubes fascinating,” she says in an artist statement.

As you might imagine, rubber is a tough surface to embroider on. Every stitched line is shown, and Taute isn’t able to seamlessly blend together the different hues. The results are fractured areas of color that abstract her portraits, although not to the point of unrecognition. And, this is partially the idea – to subvert materials. The rubber’s coarse texture is offset by the delicate thread, but at the same time the thread can seem rough with its choppy arrangement.

The artist’s inspiration comes from a number of places, but boil down to identity. She writes:

Titles, words, phrases from books, music, stories, sayings and toys play an integral part in conveying meaning and biographical info about me as a mother, wife and artist in society.  Relationships between people and objects are something I prefer to explore using my chosen medium.

Taute’s work is currently on display at the Erdmann Contemporary Gallery in Capetown. Entitled Cross My Heart, it’s on view from now until March 30 of this year. (Via Jung Katz)

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