Get Social:

Amandine Alessandra

A shut book is just a block

Check out Amandine Alessandra’s clever use of objects to create typography. I have to admit that they could be at times hard to read… especially her project “Take a seat and say something” (you can see it after the jump) but it’s really refreshing to see the transformation of mundane things when you look at them in another perspective.

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Joshua Cobos’ Photographic Athropological Investigations

Joshua Cobos lives and works in San Francisco. He has a knack for capturing subtle irony and humor wherever he takes his camera. The implications in his photographs range from bitingly satirical to piercingly veritable. His work is the most successful when presenting a scene that was in some way affected by human intervention. Our actions on this planet run the gamut from inspirational to downright bizarre. Luckily there are photographers like Cobos who present our faults and triumphs honestly.    

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Silviu & Irina Székely

Surreal collages and montages by creative duo Silviu & Irina Székely.

Currently Trending

Absurd But Genius Inventions By Dominic Wilcox

Dominic-Wilcox-Design-1

Bed made from a template of Dominic Wilcox’s body.

Dominic-Wilcox-Design-2

Tea cup with inbuilt cooling fan.

Dominic-Wilcox-Design-3

Finger nose stylus.

Dominic-Wilcox-Design-4

Finger nose stylus.

Dominic Wilcox is a British artist whose works balance on the margins of bizarre, yet somehow very logical and poignant at the same time. His cutting-edge inventions vary from unbelievable tech-wizardry (GPS shoes), to everyday objects that would actually find a place in our household (tea cup with a fan). Despite often humorist approach, Wilcox crafts his devices until they look and work like intended.

When asked, what is it that he does, Wilcox hesitates: “If I had to title myself, I would say I’m an artist/designer/thinker.” He says he loves innovation, creativity and finding conceptual surprises hidden in the banal, mundane things that surround us everyday. Thus, most of his concepts are light, direct and with a pinch of witty intention. Artist isn’t afraid to be the lab rat for his works. For example in the Switch project (below), he was wearing the metallic toggle for nearly a month, day and night.

Besides actually making these crazy inventions, Dominic starts each idea with a sketch. To pay tribute to all the unaccomplished ideas, he has published a book titled “Variations on Normal”. Full of insightful illustrations, this book may give you some inspiration on your next invention, say… a family poncho or a machine that strengthens handshakes.

Currently Trending

Liza Lou’s Incredible Sculptures And Room Sized Installations Created Out Of Beads

Liza Lou - installation

Liza Lou - installation

Photo Credit: Tom Powell

Photo Credit: Tom Powell

Liza Lou’s art making process seems a bit obsessive, to say the least.  She first came on the art radar when she exhibited Kitchen (1991-96), at the New Museum of Contemporary Art.  A 168 sq. ft. beaded “kitchen” that took five years to create and incorporated 30 million beads, Lou created the ultimate homage to the domestic.  The space contained beaded walls, tables, cereal boxes, etc. –everything created from glass beads.

In 2002, at age 32, Lou was awarded the MacArthur “genius” award.  In 2005 she founded a collective with Zulu artisans in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.  Although she doesn’t incorporate specifically African beadwork tradition, she finds within it a commonality in the process of working with beads.  Creating her works becomes a kind of meditation—the final products representing the impossibility of perfection—something Lou refers to as “the culpability of craft.”

Much less showy and, if not for the same medium, actually completely different, I am actually more drawn to Lou’s recent works.  Minimalist and hauntingly beautiful, they appear to be Agnes Martin’s, or Ellsworth Kelly’s re-imagined as beaded canvases.  And because of the beads there is a delicate, feminine sensibility to them.  They walk the line between fine art and craft without needing to be one or the other.  With them, Lou has fully embraced her method as meditation, placing process over content (although the final products are still pretty wonderful).

 

Currently Trending

A Common Name’s Urban Geodes

A Common Name is a Los Angeles based graphic designer and artist whose decidedly different take on street art is anything but common. In contrast to traditional 2-D street art materials like wheat paste and spray paint, she takes to the streets with bright geometric forms reminiscent of geodes, comprised completely of paper. Seeming to grow out of cracks and crevices in the eroded urban landscape, these pieces are suprisingly subtle and fragile treasures likely to be overlooked by those caught up in the constant hustle of city life. Treasure hunters and urban explorers can track down these tiny gems and peek into the painstaking process with which they’re made by checking out A Common Blog.

Currently Trending

Awesome Video Of The Day: Amsterdam Osdorp


The city district Amsterdam Osdorp recently merged with Slotervaart and Geuzenveld-Slotermeer and was given the name Amsterdam Nieuw-West. This change also meant the end of 20 years of restructuring urbanized areas. Amsterdam Osdorp gives a dynamic overview of the architectural highlights complete with fantastic typography, motion graphic trickery, and audio sound fantasy. Watch the video after the jump.

Currently Trending

Artist Rachel Dien Creates Delicate Fossils From Flowers

artificial-plaster-cast-flower-fossils-rachel-dein-15artificial-plaster-cast-flower-fossils-rachel-dein-12

artificial-plaster-cast-flower-fossils-rachel-dein-3artificial-plaster-cast-flower-fossils-rachel-dein-13

London based artist Rachel Dein creates fossils from everyday objects. She allows herself to preserve tangible pieces of the present as keepsakes for the future. The simplicity of the work adds to its honesty and preciousness. Dien studied as a propmaking apprentice at the English National Opera, giving her quite a extensive knowledge of object creation. Her “fossil” project began with the desire to preserve a sentimental bouquets of flowers. Her process has now blossomed into a practice of creating beautifully adorned tiles. She takes cherished, perhaps fleeting, objects and allows them to exist eternally. Her work is created with a fairly basic form of casting, yet allows her to capture delicate and intricate details. She learned the process from a glass blowing class in art college, during which she was told to press shapes into wet sand and pour molten glass over the impression. After that, she began experimenting with clay, plaster and paint, and found her way to the tile making process she uses today. Each of the molds she creates can only be used once, and therefore each piece is a unique, personalized object. Her work is undoubtedly graceful, and in a slight sense, almost whimsical. The process of casting has a long history, and despite her creating in the preset, her objects tend to feel as if they have come from a deep rooted past, truly capturing the feel of being a “fossil.” (via deMilked)

Currently Trending