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Ellen Lesperance’s Reconstructed Feminist Sweaters Realized As Drawings And Garments

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In her upcoming exhibit at Ambach & Rice, artist Ellen Lesperance intently and painstakingly reconstructs the sweaters of feminism’s heroines.  Hand drawn and hand knit, the installation serves to attach these women’s politcal ideals and activism to their personal identity.  Lesperance lovingly presents the objects nearly as if they were relics.  Indeed, throughout the exhibit Lesperance alludes to ancient heroines in connection with these modern ones.  In that light, the sweaters become a sort of “soft armor” in a struggle that extends from ancient female warriors to today’s feminist activists.  Appropriately, the title of Lesperance’s exhibit is It’s Never Over.

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Edie Fake Knows How To Handle a Pen

Edie Fake resides in Chicago.  In his work with zines, comics, and illustration, he applies a unique sense of design to playful postmodern compositions, and creates original musings on eroticism with subtle, deft penwork. He recently received a book grant from Printed Matter in NYC. He does pretty rad tattoos as well.

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Maurizio Anzeri

Maurizio Anzeri

 

Maurizio Anzeri, who is quite hard to find on the web, takes wonderful old portraits and turns them into something extraordinary.  Embroidering with a multitude of colors and math-class-like shapes, Anzeri embellishes these images, creating textural works of awesomeness.

 

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Ricky Allman

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Bold Surreal landscapes with a dash of colorful abstraction by Ricky Allman.

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Studio Visit: The Paintings Of David Hornung

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David Hornung makes paintings from both oil and gouache.  He paints quiet simple, small houses located in fenced fields, bucolic scenes of nature, solitary women and men, memento mori, snakes and birds, paths and walls.  Objects in his paintings seem to be a distillation of universal human experiences with the world and among each other.  Some objects are singled out as being important by a kind of twin cloud, the direction of light, or glowing patches of color.  The paintings are beautiful executions of color theory, which makes sense because David wrote the book on color theory “Color: A Workshop Approach.”  His subject matter hovers between observation and the symbolic, and he refers to Philip Guston’s Alphabet series with plain respect, and like Guston, David was reluctant to talk about image-based thinking.  We walked through Brooklyn on the way get some lunch, and David said that painting is hard to talk about because the ideas come out of working with images, that the process gives painters their ideas, which is a kind of reversal, because for most people who work with ideas – the ideas generate the process.

You can see David Hornung’s work at the John Davis Gallery in Hudson NY from May 23rd to June 16th.

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Nishio Yasuyuki’s Giant Women

I’m loving Nishio Yasuyuki’s massive sculptures of women. They are bizarre grotesque shrines to to horror films and nightmarish manga stories.

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Life Size Submarine Emerges From The Ground In Milan’s City Streets

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It’s not everyday that you come across a giant submarine surfacing through the historic city streets of Milan. No this isn’t some bizarre new piece of technology gone wrong but in fact an incredibly elaborate installation that’s part of an elaborate marketing campaign imagined by advertising agency M&C Saatchi Milano for insurance group Europ Assistance IT as part of a new campaign called “Protect Your Life” which promotes the importance of safeguarding your possessions through insurance. This may seem a bit over the top to promote something as dull as insurance but this imaginative stunt surely stopped everyone in their tracks as they rushed through the city to work.

The installation also included a large scale performance complete with fireman and police officers rescuing the crew of the submarine. Watch footage from the performance in the short video above. (via designboom)

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The Poignant Story Of Courtroom Sketch Artist Gary Myrick

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The prevalence of any technology forever alters the way we previously understood the world before it. Photography changed painting, audio recording changed our relationship to music, and the internet changed print media such as books and magazines. What is most often lost is the human touch, a closer connection from the source to the viewer or listener. Such is the story of courtroom sketch artist Gary Myrick, the focus of a documentary produced by Ramtid Nikzad of the New York Times as part of the Op-Doc series. A compelling figure who narrates the history of the tradition, Myrick  Myrick explains the difference and importance of his craft, “Illustration is story-telling. The difference between the camera in the courtroom and an artist might be the difference between just a cold, dry, factual transcript as opposed to a novel.” 

Beginning with Myrick explaining his work, the documentary covers the history of the medium, the advent and fall of courtroom photography, and the eventual decline of the courtroom sketch artist. “The artist at one time was the media,” says Myrick, relaying the history of artist documentarians, from war reporting through history to multi-tasking newspaper reporters who considered their drawings as important as their words. “When you funnel the story through a human being, its got a different quality than simply doing a mechanical recording of it,” says Myrick. “A lot of things going on about me are channeled through my heart, and my soul and my brain and my fingers…I like to convey just how it feels in that moment.”

Despite his immense talent, Myrick and so many other sketch artists are no longer able to work exclusively in the dying industry. Myrick poignantly notes, speaking more indicatively of so many industries that are being lost to the ease of technology, “I’m trying to draw to communicate to those that aren’t there, what it was like to be there. And maybe some of that has been getting lost.” (via juxtapoz and newyorktimes)

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