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Artist Interview: Anoka Faruqee’s Optical Paintings Will Twist And Bend Your Perception

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-07, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-21, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

Anoka Faruqee

Anoka Faruqee, 2014P-06, Acrylic on linen on panel, 22.5 x 22.5″, 2014

When walking towards a painting by Anoka Faruqee your eyes refuse to settle.  Turquoise, formed into an elongated triangular band, is pinched between two golden curves.  The turquoise is misbehaving.  Instead of sitting still it appears to flex and blend into the yellow.  As you get closer the painting changes, and at arm’s length another dramatic shift occurs, the previous turquoise and gold bands of color atomizes into narrow, serpentine, overlapping lines with several more colors, no longer just turquoise and gold.  Looking across the room your eyes settle on another painting.  This square shaped canvas is a warm gray that seems to dance.  Upon closer inspection the pleasantly worked surface transforms into a swirling design of forest green and cherry red lines.  Faruqee calls this series of paintings the Moiré series, after the illusion with the same name.  The history of Modern art is often told as a race towards extremes, but will that be true of 21st century art?  Anoka Faruqee’s work seems to place less emphasis on ‘pureness’ than other abstraction.  Faruqee’s work suggests that we can be more complex, and where artists over the past sixty years searched for the strongest statement, maybe our searches will lead in different, more nuanced directions.   

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Hsiao-Chi Tsai Combines Fibers And Fashion To Create Eye-Popping, Wearable Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Hsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile ArtHsiao-Chi Tsai - Wearable Textile Art

Combining fiber art, sculpture, and fashion, artist Hsiao-Chi Tsai creates beautifully designed wearable art using a variety of different textiles. He uses brightly colored fabric to construct intricate pieces that can be worn on your head and around your neck. The materials used are cut into floral-like shapes that flow organically around the person who is wearing it. A designer by nature, the artist bases these creations off his own illustrations. Because Tsai constructs his designs with such soft material, they appear comfortable despite their non-functional shape and placement. Each piece is creatively designed, utilizing asymmetrical forms and a unique color palette. Although this series, titled Wonderland, is not likely to go with anything in your closet, wearing one of Tsai’s pieces would definitely be a statement!

Creating sculptural, wearable art, this textile designer also forms brilliant installations using the same technique and style as his fashionable art pieces. Using the same textile material, Tsai builds large installations that loops, swirls, and hangs; completely transforming the spaces they are in. These pieces are much like his wearable art, using some of the same elements and cut-out fabric. Each installation is an explosion in its space, with endless gushing patterns. The surge of color in Tsai’s installations can turn any sterile space into a wonderland of cascading fabric flora. Both his wearable textile art series and his installations are uniquely sculptural and are created cleverly with an unlikely material.

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Luzinterruptus’ Melbourne Installation Of Thousands of Books and LEDs

“Literature vs. Traffic”:

 

To the other side of the world we went, going from the sunny summer in Madrid to a mild and rainy winter, with the romantic intention of converting the modern and somewhat cold architecture of Federation Square, into a cozy, human and intimate space, which encouraged reading and tranquility.

 

So the folks at Milan-based collective Luzinterruptus (previously) went down to Melbourne and did their thing with lights (if you don’t know by now, they’ve put on some really ill installations using all sorts of LED lights), except this time they used thousands of books to “block traffic” in “a symbolic gesture in which literature took control of the streets and became the conquerer of the public space”. The pages seem to flow into one another as a cohesive whole and the LEDs add some sort of mystical dimension to the whole thing. I love the shots of people just swimming in the installation, which was up for a whole month. The positive message promoting literacy is just frosting on the cake. Click the jump to see more of what went down. (via)

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Modern Objects Made to Look Like 100 Year-Old Relics

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The work of artist Maico Akiba is almost a kind of future nostalgia.  Maico begins his work with commonplace objects such as electronics or clothing.  He alters the objects to appear as if they are 100 years old.  Rust and moss are taking over electronics while paint chips and peels away.  Although, the electronics look like relics, they are entirely functional.  Perhaps, this is how the future ruins of present day life will look.  They also serve as a comical type of existential reminder.

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Illustrated Type

 

B/D Intern Alumni and all around cool gal Alexis Kaneshiro has curated a great exhibition at Gallery Nucleus celebrating the almighty hand drawn typography. Long before we had computers, adobe software, and other mass printing services we used our own two hands to create beautiful typography for everything from signs to packaging for products. The show opens May 14th until June 6th so head on over to the gallery, give Alexis a high five and check out some killer experimental type.

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Liu Zhi Yin

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Liu Zhi Yin, an emerging artist from China, recently earned her Masters at the Luxun Academy of Fine Arts and has been exhibiting her sculptures in group shows. Liu Zhi uses fiber glass or bronze to construct sculptures of female characters that exude humor, but more than anything else, femininity in every sense of the word. Regardless of either awkward pose or expression, the movement and form of her pieces executes the constant sophisticated finish.

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Maya Lin’s Landscape/Art

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According to Richard Andrews, Director of the Henry Art Gallery, her new work shows how Lin continues to explore landscape as both form and content.

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Shamus Clisset Renders Morbid And Humorous Versions Of Reality In B/D’s Book 8: Strange Daze

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Shamus Clisset (aka, Fake Shamus) is a digital artist who uses 3D modeling software to construct bizarre and often humorous scenes that multiply reality and critique consumer culture. His work is featured in Beautiful/Decay’s Book 8: Strange Daze, a curated collection of talented artists who explore the realms of the uncanny: parallel universes, psychedelic dream states, supernatural activity, and more. Also included in the book is the work of Neil Krug, a photographer who drenches his shots in hallucinatory colors, bending time and reality to invoke the nostalgia and liberatory zeal of the 1960s. Andrea Wan, a Berlin-based artist, also brings her own flavor of absurdity to the book in the form of surreal illustrations of masked and multiple-headed beings. Strange Daze is ideal for those art lovers and dreamers who wish to challenge everyday banality by exploring alternative visions of the world.

We featured Clisset’s work in 2011, when he was making insane (and often violent) mashed-up universes of trash and cultural signifiers. Since then, Clisset has rebirthed his artistic identity as “Fake Shamus,” a “digital golem” formed out of 3D-rendered objects (Source). The shapes this humanoid beast can take are limitless; in one image he is a mystical being upholstered in grass who summons a collection of empty beer cans; in another he is an industrious builder, his muscular body made out of what appears to be lumps of brightly-colored Plasticine. And while Clisset’s works may appear to have photographic elements, do not be deceived; everything in his images is created in a digital, 3D space. By mimicking reality, Clisset brings up fascinating questions of “authenticity” versus “fakery,” unveiling in the process that the entire world is a strange construction subject to our perception.

To see our feature on Clisset and similar artists, check out Book 8: Strange Daze. Copies are available at a limited quantity in our shop, so grab yours today.

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