The Crowded Horror Of Hubert Blanz’ Ariel Photographs Of Highways

tumblr_moogmnuSup1qzpyz2o1_500 tumblr_moogmnuSup1qzpyz2o2_500 tumblr_moogmnuSup1qzpyz2o3_500

As natural gas reserves lessen and human population increases, many artists have taken the task of portraying dystopian versions of our world, visually demonstrating the costs of urban sprawl. Viennese-based photographer Hubert Blanz has taken the expansion of the world’s highways to their terrifying logical conclusion, offering a digitally collaged set of images which imagines the road systems stacked upon each other in endless repetition.

Offering visions of a planet covered by concrete and blacktop, there is a swirling, organized chaos found in the photos, one which mirrors the many present day megalopolis of the world. Displaying roads which lead to nowhere, but are expansions built upon assumptions of the future we are heading towards, the Hindelang, Germany-born Blanz explains his quixotic photoseries; “Roadshow is a series of images formed and built up from the digital recordings of pre-existing freeways networks, roads, bridges, and intersections. The images are both documentations of actual built spaces and the imaginary re-creation of potential new cities.” (via foxgrl) 

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Enrico Ferrarini’s Takes Traditional Sculpture To Its Digital Conclusion

tumblr_n4uw2huyv01r0i205o1_1280 tumblr_n4uw2huyv01r0i205o7_1280 tumblr_n4uw2huyv01r0i205o8_1280

Italian artist Enrico Ferrarini builds upon the famous art history of his country, quite literally,  in his unique style which takes traditional sculpture to its digital conclusion. By carving and casting sculptures and then creating multiples of them, Ferrrani combined them, bring a glitched, modernly repetitive styling to time-honored sculpting methods.

The Moderna, Italy-born artist has studied at the Florence Academy of Fine Arts (where some of the most famous sculptures of all time, including Donatello and Michelangelo’s Davids reside), and employs methods of sculpture which are not typically learned by today’s artists. Perhaps that is why his work has a deeper resonance; employing the methods of the past to work with the styling of today. (via myampgoesto11)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!

Takashi Murakami’s First Full-Length Movie “Jellyfish Eyes” Will Blow You Away

60135357f259a2bf4fe641df4277_jellyfish-eyes jellyfish-eyes-takashi-murakami-yatzer-7

World-renowned art superstar Takashi Murakami (and his production company Kaikai Kiki Co., Ltd.) has always dabbled in fine art mediums with a large splash of commercial elements, but his latest venture is taking on the largest popular medium of them all. Jellyfish Eyes is the artist’s first foray into live-action, full-length films, and from the looks of the incredible trailer, it will have all of the elements of Murakami’s “superflat” mix of high and low culture.

“Jellyfish Eyes tells the story of Masashi, a young boy who moves to a sleepy town in the Japanese countryside with his mother in the wake of a natural disaster. After returning home from his new elementary school one day, Masashi discovers a flying jellyfish-like creature whom he befriends and names Kurage-bo. Masashi soon discovers that all his classmates have similarly magical pets, known as F.R.I.E.N.D.s, which are controlled by electronic devices that the children use to battle one another. Despite their playful appearances, however, these F.R.I.E.N.D.s turn out to be part of a sinister plot that will threaten the entire town.”

 

Screening dates after the jump.

Read More >

Currently Trending

Shen Shaomin’s Beautiful And Terrifying Bone Sculptures

Shen ShaominShen Shaomin Shen Shaomin

Bones automatically insinuate death, and often are the only physical remnant that insinuates life once existed. Shen Shaomin‘s bone works are equal parts terrifying and fascinating, man-made memorials to human intervention on the planet. Creatures that never have been or should be are pieced together from human and animal skeletons. The bones are carved and relief-carved with text taken from several sources, including the Bible, the Koran, and various sources. Inscribed in English, Arabic, and Chinese, the texts serve as warnings to the two largest industrial nations in the world of the damage being caused to the planet.

Related to the Chinese practice of bonsai, or long-term manipulation of a living tree to one’s will based on aesthetic and stylistic choices, Shaomin has also used bonsai in past works as a metaphor for human intervention upon nature.

In an interview with the University of Sydney’s ARTSPACE CHINA, Shaomin explains the terror he hopes to evoke in his skeletal works, “China’s current situation is very much like my bonsais. At first glance you will find it beautiful, but once you look more carefully you’ll see there are terrifying things behind that beauty. China has over a billion people, but over 800 million of those people are peasants. A peasant’s standard of life in China is still pretty basic. They say that if every one of those 800 Chinese peasants showered every day it would take more than all the water on the planet. That’s a scary thought.” (via myampgoesto11)

Read More >

Currently Trending

The Bizarre Fan Art of World Dictators

kimjongun2

Kim Jong-un, originally posted by @harleyjohnson92 on Instagram

kimjongun

Kim Jong-un, originally posted by @jacob_skyler_allen on Instagram

putin

Vladimir Putin, originally posted by @miss1718 on Instagram

quadaffi

Muammar Gaddafi, originally posted by @fabiankytir on Instagram

The world of fan art knows no bounds. Television shows like Game of Thrones and Sherlock have countless drawings and paintings dedicated to them (and the celebrities that star in them), but what about world dictators? We’re talking Putin, Gaddafi, Kim Jong-un, and more all with colorful drawings, paintings, and even homages made from donuts.

Some of these images are just ridiculous, like Kim Jong-un riding a dolphin over the beach (in a background that looks as colorful as a Lisa Frank illustration). Others are more serious attempts at portraiture, like the work of Amsterdam-based artist Michele Boccamazzo. He mixes pen, ink, and watercolor in realistic renderings like Bashar al-Assad. “Some of them are just born with a silver spoon in their mouth, some believe in their vision of a better world and some are just status seeker (or social climber) with a smart politic career.” He writes.

With the atrocities suffered at the hands of these men, they hardly seem like candidates for fan art, so perhaps its best to peg some of these images as satire. It makes looking at these works even more bizarre than what’s already pictured.  (via Lost At E Minor and Vocativ)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Paul Rousso’s Larger-Than-Life Crumpled Paper Sculptures

paul-rousso-02 paul-rousso-04 paul-rousso-08 paul-rousso-09

Artist Paul Rousso spent part of his career as an art director and freelance illustrator for big companies like Revlon, Clairol, and Bloomingdales. So, it’s fitting that his recent body of work relates to pop art and features realistic, larger-than-life sculptures of discarded candy wrappers, magazine pages, and money. He delicately forms acrylic into folds and creases of paper, and paints it to look like it’s been beat up, stepped on, and generally seen better days.

Rousso is specifically interested in these small pieces of ephemera that mean so much to us. From his artist statement:

Ever since I was a child I have been fascinated by the endless oscillation of the human condition through text and imagery. As alternating replicas of our day-to-day become transformed by the inexplicable need to create, I endeavor to illuminate the imagined, effervescent edges of our all but invisible lives through the flat, two-dimensional subject matter that is all around us. As these shifting forms become distorted through the lens of history, my work inscribes an epitaph to the printed reality that was our past existence.

By blowing up this forgettable part of popular culture, Rousso makes it inescapable. It’s in your face and won’t be ignored, reminding us about the obsessions that we have with it and eventually (try) and forget. (Via PICDIT and mashKULTURE)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Byoungho Kim’s ‘Progression of Silence’ Engages Sight and Sound

tumblr_n48rn77C6D1r0i205o1_1280 tumblr_n48rn77C6D1r0i205o2_1280 tumblr_n48rn77C6D1r0i205o3_1280

Byoungho Kim‘s The Progression of Silence engages sight and sound, using an aesthetically and aurally pleasing repetition of bells. A site-specific installation, Kim constructed the massive work from brass, piezo, signal wire and a sound controller, to hang in the spiral stair case of the Johnnie Walker House, an arts exhibition space opened in 2013 buy the famous whisky distiller. The piece hangs from the roof of the building down to the floor, engaging the entirety of the architecture, and with sound, the people inside the building. Says Kim, “One of the “materials” I like to use is sound. The essence of sound is the vibrations of frequency, and these vibrations are often seen as geometric patterns to the eye. Through the process of changing these geometric patterns, namely modulation, they become sounds for the artworks.”

Kim fully explains his process, “My work is an approach toward the rationality that was spontaneously generated with the progression of civilization such as systems, standards and modules. The unitized and systemized material/immaterial elements become the material of my work. The output created from my materials poses questions on the essence of life as well as being a study on human nature.” (via myampgoesto11)

Read More >

Currently Trending

Greg Briggs’ Documents The Nameless Faces That Clean Galleries And Museums

GregBriggsMelbourneCleaners2 GregBriggsMelbourneCleaners3 GregBriggsMelbourneCleaners4

Australian photographer Greg Briggs‘ new photoseries Melbourne Cleaners highlights the often nameless faces that clean and restore the seemingly untouched galleries, theaters and museums. By focusing on the people who keep these spaces pristine, Briggs not only acknowledges the work of these people, but also takes the viewer behind the scenes to an even more quite, contemplative place, rarely seen by most museum-goers.

Taking place via a virtual tour of important architecture and places throughout Melbourne, Australia, Briggs’ photoseries was captured over six months. Capturing these workers who generally work alone, they are seemingly oblivious to the camera, and are caught in intensely private moments alone with their work. One cannot help but notice how these abandoned, quiet, spaces might be a better way to actually appreciate all the works of art we often walk right by during busy open hours.

Katie Hosmer at My Modern Met writes, “The artist captures what seem like voyeuristic moments as cleaners go about their work in some of the city’s important and iconic buildings including St Paul’s Cathedral and The Queens Hall, Parliament House. Surrounded by classic architecture andfamous artwork, each individual concentrates on the task at hand and seems completely unaware of the camera’s presence. Viewers can almost hear the low hum of polishing machines, the soft whoosh of feathers dusting across the nooks of a picture frame, and the splatter of bottle spraying cleaner along the surface of glass.” (via mymodernmet)

Read More >

Currently Trending