An Imaginary City Of Famous Artists’ Buildings

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Italian architect and illustrator Federico Babina has created 27 fantasy buildings that meld famous artists and the places where they might live. The series “Archist City” is a clever melding of cross-sectional drawings of buildings and the signature styles of artists including Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst, Pablo Picasso, Keith Haring, Joan Miró, Josef Albers, and Piet Mondrian. The result is a cohesive group of easily identifiable buildings—in fact, pairing the artist with the correct drawing is part of the fun.

“Art, architecture and sculpture are historically linked by an unbreakable thread, we find examples of paintings and sculptures having a direct influence on architectural design. … Painting sculpture and architecture have always been complementary disciplines that influence each other and feed to grow and develop along common paths.”

Babina’s skilled artwork makes this look easy, but in actuality first fitting the artists’ iconic styles into an architectural framework, then keeping all of the buildings consistent in execution is the mark of a very skilled artist. Some of the artists play well together: Mondrian and Albers and Rothko for example. Others would seem to defy architecture, like Dali, Haring, and Miro, yet Babina has brought them into his imaginary cityscape. The identical background texture and color, font, and scale relative to the paper help tie the pieces together.

The silhouetted figures help sell these as buildings instead of artworks and the cross-cuts reveal wonderful details: Andy Warhol’s building includes soup cans and his Marilyn Monroe paintings; the huge shark in Damien’s Hirst’s building references his 1991 work “The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living.”

“These images represent an imaginary and imagined world of shapes that uses the brush to paint architecture.”

What fun it would be to inhabit this world of huge imaginations, awesome ability, and lasting artistic legacy.

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Filip Dujardin’s Fictional Photographs Of Real Buildings

Filip Dujardin - Photograph

Filip Dujardin - Photograph

Filip Dujardin - Photograph

Filip Dujardin photographs buildings that are post modern and mundane. They are nondescript and unassuming. He has a way of spicing things up, though. With the help of Photoshop, Dujardin uses these photos and remixes them into structures we’ve never seen before and could never exist in our world. His series of images, titled Fictions, is just that, but done so seamlessly and with such mastery that we might think they are real.

Dujardin’s work contains some spectacular things. Buildings are labyrinths and Escher-eque in their construction. You could travel the same path over and over again, but never get anywhere. Oh well, who cares? You probably can’t even get inside. They don’t have entrances; they are simply a mass of siding and concrete.

Dujardin’s architecture is a mass of things that we love looking at buildings.  Surface decoration is more important than structural integrity. Take, for instance, the windows. In multiple photographs, he’s adorned building with all different factory-style windows.The varying color and size is a design decision, and he places them in clusters. Likewise, he uses the repeating of balconies, ducts, and vents to create patterns. Metal siding is collaged based on color combination than anything having to do with an actual building.

We can try to apply logic to Dujardin’s structures. We’re probably familiar with these types of buildings, and expect them to look a certain way. But, with Dujardin’s doctored photographs, we cannot. Instead, we can admire them for the fantasy that they are.

After gazing at Dujardin’s work for awhile, it occurs to that this series was probably a lot of fun to create. It’s the digital equivalent of playing with Legos. There are a lot of pieces, and with the help of Photoshop you can cut them up, flip them, and arrange them however you wish.

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Architectural Photography That Looks Like Futuristic Viruses

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Munich, Germany based Cory Stevens shoots architectural photography in a peculiar way.  He abstracts the architecture by photographing a segment of a building and reflecting it in various ways.  In some photos the reflection is duplicated, and in others its repeated many times as if in a kaleidoscope.  All of the reflections merge seamlessly, though, as if it were one floating structure.  The strange symmetry gives the buildings an almost organic quality as if it were about to divide and multiply on its own.  In a way, they resemble viruses made of steel, cement, and glass.

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