Peter Anton’s Realistic Sculptures Will Fool You Into Eating Them

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For those with a sweet tooth, the work of Peter Anton might make you hungry. The artist’s hyperrealistic sculptures of cakes, candies, and ice cream bring the sugary treats to life. At first glance, they pass as real food rather than as convincingly-painted and crafted artworks. “I like to alter and overstate foods to give them new meanings,” Anton writes in an artist statement.

The colorful, larger-than-life works showcase an acute understanding of texture and lighting. Anton was very aware at how luster plays into the believability of his objects. As a result, some of the “frosted” donuts shine just as you’d imagine. In non-glazed objects though, he applies a matte finish.

Anton has an innate reverence for what we eat, and it’s what leads to these works creation. He says:

Food brings people together and there is no better way to celebrate life. Through the use of humor, scale, irony, and intensity in my forms, the foods we take for granted become aesthetically pleasing and seductive in atypical ways. I like to create art that can lure, charm, tease, disarm and surprise. My sculptures put viewers in a vulnerable state so that I can communicate with their inner selves in a more honest and direct way. I activate the hunger people have for the things that give them pleasure and force them to surrender. The sensual nature of the works stimulates basic human needs and desires that generate cravings and passion.

 

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Joseph Marr’s Life-Size Sensual Sugar Sculptures

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Australian artist Joseph Marr creates remarkable human-sized sculptures that are made out of sugar. The translucent candy-like texture gives the naked bodies a sensual feel and its color and whimsical appeal.  Marr colors the sculptures with ingredients like cola and raspberry fruit; don’t try eating them, though—most are protected by a layer of polyurethane.

Marr uses the delicious medium in order to convey that sexually charged aura that accompanies the stripped down sculptures. According to TreadHunter, the juxtaposition between the sugary syrup and the naked bodies represents the way that sexual relationships can be sweet and satisfying, but also the way in which people get themselves into sticky situations over lust and desire.

Sex sells and so does candy- the combination of both is bound to create extra appeal to the already wonderful creations.

Joseph Marr was born in 1979 in Australia and now lives and works in Berlin.(via Tread Hunter)

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Pip&Pop Creates Miniature Worlds Made Out Of Pastel-Colored Candies

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Nicole Andrijevic and Tanya Schultz, an Australian artist duo, Pip&Pop, collaborate to create delicious-looking installation in various galleries around the world. The constructions, intricately intalled in a gallery floor, is made out of colourful sweets mixed with glitter, beads, modelling clay, wax, polystyrene, wire, toys, sand, and other equally vibrant found objects.

This mini candy wonderland, a cartooonish looking maquette, is heavily influenced by Japanese pop culture.

“Throughout history there has been a long tradition of depicting journeys through, and in search of, imaginary lands and utopian worlds[…] the work draws on this rich history of other worlds as told through mythologies, Japanese folk tales, video games, cinema, children’s literature and ancient cosmologies.”

(Via Feather of Me and HuffPost)

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Mouthwatering Photographs Of Color Coded Candy

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Photographer Emily Blincoe has created a bright, fun, and mouth-watering photo series using a candy color palette. Blincoe’s series features candy grouped by color and meticulously arranged using a background that matches the featured candy’s color. This series provokes a number of sensory experiences related to color and how we perceive the taste, smell, and texture of a candy because of its color. These photographs also bring us back to childhood’s first encounters with the arrangement of candy in sweet shops, and the allure found in shiny unwrapped packages. Some of Blincoe’s other photography also features various neatly-arranged groups of objects. She currently lives in Austin, Texas.

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Powerfully Political Art Made From Food

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The artwork created by the Japanese art collective known as Three creates work with a political subtext as powerful as it is subtle.  Three often uses common food objects such as fish shaped soy sauce packets or candy.  For example, the installation Eat Me uses 7,000 wrapped candy pieces hung from the gallery ceiling in the shape of a house.  Visitors are encouraged to pluck candy from the installation and toss the wrapper in a corner set aside in the gallery.  Slowly throughout the day the ‘house’ of candy is transformed into a pile of trash – a symbolic recreation of the overwhelming destruction of homes by Japan’s 2011 earthquake and tsunami.

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