Hand Painted Weaponry Dishware By Trevor Jackson

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Trevor Jackson‘s ceramic work is deceptively innocent.  Hand painted in blue, hidden behind animals, flowers, and flourishes are deadly weapons.  His work are definitely conversation pieces for an especially hot topic.  While his intentions with the pieces aren’t entirely obvious, the series is clearly political.  Typically utilitarian weapons are presented as garishly decorated and entirely harmless.  Dishware that is often passed down from generation to generation is stylized with politically intense imagery.

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Livia Marin’s Beautifully Broken China

Livia Marin Sculpture Livia Marin Sculpture

Livia Marin Sculpture

Livia Marin‘s Broken Things seem just fine.  The sculptures of her Broken Things series do indeed appear to be broken ceramic dishware.  However, for what the household items lost in usefulness retain in its aesthetic value.  Congealed liquid seems to pour out of the damaged cups.  The decorative patterns are pulled along out with the container’s little spill.    The sculptures are reminiscent of a family’s “good china” – utilitarian objects that seem to cherished for their decorative nature rather than ever see any use.

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Xue Jiye’s Intense Paintings of Contorted Human Figures in Barren Wastelands

High level of intensity from Chinese artist Xue Jiye. No additives or preservatives.

Working mostly in earthy/flesh tones, Xue just goes for all-out anguish in his work. Contorting and mutilating his subjects, he reduces us all to our most animalistic, base tendencies. I never mind when an artist chooses to bring the pain when the work is as good as these are.

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Pedestrians Create Leaves On Trees By Walking Across Large Canvases On The Street

 

Cool project from the DDB China Group for the China Environmental Protection Foundation:

We decided to leverage a busy pedestrian crossing; a place where both pedestrians and drivers meet. We lay a giant canvas of 12.6 meters long by 7 meters wide on the ground, covering the pedestrian crossing with a large leafless tree. Placed on either side of the road beneath the traffic lights, were sponge cushions soaked in green environmentally friendly washable and quick dry paint. As pedestrians walked towards the crossing, they would step onto the green sponge and as they walked, the soles of their feet would make foot imprints onto the tree on the ground. Each green footprint added to the canvas like leaves growing on a bare tree, which made people feel that by walking they could create a greener environment.

It’s nice to see a project that gets the public completely involved without sacrificing any quality control. See some detail images after the jump. (via) Read More >

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Zhang Kechun’s The Yellow River

Zhang Kechun‘s photography series The Yellow River keeps a watchful eye on a natural resource that has brought both support and devastation to the country it runs through. While Kechun agrees it is “improper for a photographer to make comments on mountains and rivers” a subdued palette offers a thoughtful visual documentary that needs no comment.

“As being alive, we all go by with time. But we are still here, and we may have a better consideration on the future after having a look at the past and present with heart.” — excerpt from artist’s statement (via WeWasteTime)

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Luo Yang and the Allure of Youth

Luo Yang is a photographer from Shenyang, China, now living in Beijing.  Working strictly with film and rarely doctoring her photos, Luo Yang’s work is an exploration of youth: longing, uncertainty, spindly-limbed awkwardness, and, of course, an endlessly enviable sense of cool.   In her shows, highly staged portraits, casual poses, and spontaneous shots all appear alongside on another, blurring the inherent truth of the medium of photography.

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Patrick Tsai’s Modern Times In China

Ever see something bizarre during your daily routine? It may make you laugh, cry, or make you scratch your head. Later in the day you try to tell friends about what you saw but somehow something gets lost in the translation.  Patrick Tsai’s Modern Times series manages to capture those very moments for all of us to enjoy.

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Zhang Xiao

Zhang Xiao, a Chinese freelance photographer, knows just how to grip the viewer’s attention. Incredibly nostalgic, and dream-like, these photos have a way of keeping themselves in our thoughts. I especially enjoyed his series entitled: They I, They II, and They III.

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