Interactive Installation Allows Viewers To Create, Shape, And Color The Sky

everyware interactive installation

everyware interactive installation

CLOUD PINK @ Savina Gallery from everyware.kr on Vimeo.

Korean artist group Everyware (Hynwoo Bang and Yunsil Heo) recreates the sky and its clouds as part of an interactive installation on the ceiling of a Korean exhibition space, the Savina Gallery.

Cloud Pink, a multi-media project, serves a pseudo sky pool in which you can touch and interact with the color, shapes and sizes of clouds. The work is composed of a fabric screen, and an interactive software; the two work together to create a believable yet whimsical recreation of the clouds on the sky.

“Today, I visualize my colorful cloud of words right in front of your eyes. Touch the pink clouds drifting on a giant fabric screen, reminisce your childhood clouds of dreams. I spent countless sleepless nights just to realize my unproductive and only romantic cloud of words. But, isn’t it nice if we could feel the clouds at our fingertips?”

Indoor Clouds Created Tetsuo Kondo Architects

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture indoor clouds

Tetsuo Kondo Architecture8

The architectural firm Tetsuo Kondo Architects makes creative use of a unique material: clouds.  They carefully manipulate the humidity and temperature in buildings to create indoor clouds.  This eventually creates three distinct layers within the room with actual clouds gathering in the middle.  The firm uses the space to allow visitors to experience the cloud from below, within, and above.  In a way clouds are architectural components of the natural world that serve several practical purposes.  Tetsuo Kondo Architects pull these clouds inside not only as a strange material, but also as a symbol of the relationship between architecture and the surrounding environment. (Via Collabcubed)

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Berndnaut Smilde’s Indoor Cloud Collection

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde

Berndnaut Smilde – Making Clouds from The Avant/Garde Diaries on Vimeo.

When viewing (usually photographic) evidence of Dutch artist Berndnaut Smilde‘s  fantastical cloud works, the first question is usually: “Is it real?”

Yes, it’s actually a small, perfect indoor cloud.

The next question you might have is “How?” The answer is shrouded in Smilde’s process, which requires deftly precise observations of humidity, temperature, air movement and lighting. Existing for just one perfect moment, then slipping away, his clouds are carefully documented via photograph, but in the video above—the viewer gets a glimpse at the cloud-making event, narrated by the artist. The strange, beautiful creations appear and fades, serving as both a physical phenomena and a lilting metaphor for grasping at the ephemeral.