Paul Jackson Renders Incredibly Detailed Drawings Of Creatures With Skeletons That Erupt From Their Bodies

Paul Jackson - Pen and Ink

Paul Jackson - Pen and Ink

Paul Jackson - Pen and Ink

Paul Jackson - Pen and Ink

The incredibly detailed pen and ink illustrators of Toronto based artist Paul Jackson take on the form of animals and humans, with their insides ascending from their bodies. His rendering of skeletal structures of wolves, dinosaurs, and humans is anatomically something to be admired. His illustrations have a dark aura, as he portrays different animals with layers of organs erupting from their skin. We can see Jackson’s well-refined skill in the very believable texture of the fur, skin, and bone in his work. Each illustration remains very realistic, despite their mystical nature. His creatures are like spirit-animals that are attempting to rise out of their earthly shell, erupting out of their exteriors.

There is a strong element of life and death his Jackson’s work, as many of his drawings contain half living creature and half skeleton. Pushing this boundary of the living world even further, many of Jackson’s works contain a visible “glitch.” There is a disruption in the composition. A face slowly turns into waves of “white noise,” like a sound wave encountering interference. This interference literally blurs the line between a creature, like Jackson’s bear, that is alive, with one that is dead. The artist has created his work on a large and small scale, and even has many of them available as prints, t-shirts, and patches. Make sure to check out his website for more astonishing illustrations and a great time-lapse video of the artist in action.

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Damien Hirst And Four Other Artists Who Make Art About Death

Damien Hirst

Damien Hirst

Joel Peter Witkin

Joel Peter Witkin

Angelo Filomeno

Angelo Filomeno

It’s Halloween season, and campy macabre aesthetic surrounds us, making the general public a little more open to the darker parts of our existence.  Reflecting back on the origin of this holiday, All Hallow’s Eve and Samhain, the pagan celebration, it’s clear that death and the unseen world is the foundation.  Our ancestors believed that the veil to the other side became thin or disappeared completely on this night, allowing the spirit world to comingle with the physical and living world. There are many people and cultures that still hold this belief and practice today.

In light of the season I began searching through aesthetically significant contemporary art that finds its foundations in death and dying.  This is Part 1 of 2 of the scope of art about death, ranging widely in medium and other interwoven themes.  Damien Hirst, Angelo Filomeno, Joel Peter Witkin, Konrad Smolenski and Doris Salcedo all embrace the subject of death and dying in a widely varied manner.  As well, all are highly revered in their own right for their individual continuums of art produced over the years.

Damien Hirst is no stranger to controversy as an artist.  He always delivers shock value well and does not shy away from creating work that makes viewers squirm.  Materials he used to create the pieces featured here range from dead flies, to animal carcasses, formaldehyde and maggots.  Hirst’s works don’t just discuss the business of birth, death and dying- they display it in action right before your eyes, in a way that some of the work nearly becomes about life itself. 

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