Erika Sanada’s Grotesque Yet Poignant Creatures Give Face To A Child’s Fears

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Erika Sanada’s imaginary creatures toe the line between the grotesque and the adorable; inspired by her childhood trauma and memories of bullying, the artist delves into her deepest anxieties, plucking out tiny hairless ceramic beasts, each of whom appears strangely misshapen by a nervous sort of womb. As a girl, Sanada imagined transforming her tormenters into hideous monsters, presented here as birds and rats with twin heads or dogs that display infinite rows of glinting teeth.

As if stolen from a perverse Eden, Sanada’s endearing beasts are as innocent as they are frightful. “Newborns” introduces a trinity of puppy-rat hybrids, who, despite their sharp claws and thick, bald tails, elicit our sympathies; their soft, tender eyes have yet to open, and the tiniest of baby tongues pokes out of a toothless mouth. Similarly, a hairless beast crawls across a platform, leaving a trail of sticky epoxy that resembles amniotic fluid. He has two tails, each fleshy and naked, and yet he is so poignantly small and delicate that we yearn to comfort and protect him as he makes a perilous journey into the adult world.

As if possessed, Sanada’s cast of characters, whom she charmingly refers to as “Odd Things,” reveal black marble-white eyes, absent of pupils or irises, the effect of which is wonderfully unsettling. As we confront these magical manifestations of our most secret fears, they stare back invisibly, tracking us not with sight but with an intractable knowledge of our own vulnerabilities. Take a look. (via KoiKoiKoi)
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The Monstrous Drawings Of Seungyea Park Evoke Feelings Of fear

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Korean artist Seungyea Park (also known as Spunky Zoe) creates these grotesque portraits that reveal the ‘Monstrousness’ caused by fear in our inner world. Park works with a detail oriented eye, with ball-pen and paintbrush at hand, she creates these monochrome, realistic paintings/drawings of bodies with abnormal characteristics (i.e extra hands and eyes, animal-human hybrids,etc).

Park describes her work as a study of fear. With a deep understanding of what fear means to the variety of people/characters she portrays , Park goes right ahead and gives these confining thoughts a vision. Furthermore,  Park wishes to overcome her personal fears as well.  Through her images, she manages to overcome avoidance and becomes completely desensitized by “facing monsters, or the true nature of fear itself.”

“Due to fear and horror being used as the most ‘universal’ and constant devices to maintain social systems as ‘injustice’, and consider them ‘enemies’. While regarding tabooed beings deviating from us as monsters. we ourselves become freaks. Monsters are everywhere.”

(via Hi-Fructose)

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Alicia Martin Lopez’s Nightmarish Paintings Imagine Our Inner Demons, Secret Fears

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The artist Alicia Martin Lopez gives form to her emotional demons through her darkly seen paintings; imagining the shapes and tones of oft-repressed memories and desires, her work dares to plunge into the depths of human fear. With their infinitely cavernous black eyes, Lopez’s disquietingly amorphous characters invite viewers into the nightmarish dreamscape of our own psychological narratives.

Lopez’s frightful beings inhabit a space outside the confines of time; day and night blur together as light pours in and leaks out of the scene without cause. The monsters are wildly unbound, floating in midair, drifting on water, or holding desperately to rock formations, toes clinched with uncertainty. Like thoughts that flood the darkest corners of the human psyche, the beasts may appear at any time in any place, haunting the mind’s eye without warning.

As soon as they rear their heads, however, the creatures are woefully repressed; one octopus-like animal sits confined in a cell, his crooked neck craning to accommodate a sickly grey face. Like our own private demons, Lopez’s creatures are starved of attention and psychic nourishment, kept bottled in the murky depths of subconscious memory. They each stare downward as if collapsed by the space above them, their bodies bracing against the weight of repression. A flying squid’s wings appear as if crushed by exhaustion; sea creatures’ bearded faces droop into impossibly still water, their sorrowful expressions reflected back at them.

These animals are a tangible reminder of memories and sufferings that refuse to stay buried; collapsing in upon themselves, they beg for our recognition. In granting form to formless worries, the artist suggests that our psychological demons are perhaps less fearful than they are beautifully, mournfully sympathetic. Take a look. (via Hi Fructose and Juxtapoz)
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