Sally Lundburg Creates Stunning Sculptures out Of Koa Logs To Explore Hawaii’s Social History

Hawaiian artist Sally Lundburg is greatly influenced by her native land’s “history of ecological and social invasions and it’s shifting cultural landscape, as well as personal experiences of self-reliance, independence, isolation, and exposure to spirituality and faith.” She is a multi faceted artist, as she works with sculpture, photography, film and video to explore notions of identity and social dynamics.

On her recent stunning body of work, Epiphytes and Invasives (totem series), Lundberg creates sculptural objects that serve as a medium to further investigate and literally envision the social history of post-contact Hawaii and the diverse family lineages that make up Hawaii today.

These ‘sculptures’ are nothing more that milled longs and branches that have been “punctured with commercial pine woodworking plugs, rusty fencing stakes, upholstery pins, rope, and dried ma’o hau hele flowers”. However, it is the archival portraits that Lundburg imprints on them that, together with the organic elements, make this series a remarkable artistic endeavor.

Her works look simple, however there are reasons for each and every detail that she ads on her sculptural objects. It is important to appreciate and put further thought upon the juxtapositions of organic and inorganic materials, as well as her emphasis of trying to mesh these two opposites together. On her description of this series, Lundburg explains that Epiphytes are plants that grow on other plants, and in rainforests [known for its tropical conditions, something that is an outright connection to Hawaii) just about any plant can grow epiphytically. Her usage of organic tropical flowers, plants and Koa logs together with the archival portraits work symbiotically to represent the social history of post-contact Hawaii and its diverse yet close-knitted family lineages that make up Hawaii today.

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Jared Yamanuha’s Intricate Patterns Cut Into Photographs Of Hawaiian Imagery

Jared YamanuhaJared Yamanuha photography Jared Yamanuha photography

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Hawaiian artist Jared Yamanuha takes his own photographs of iconic Hawaiian brands and images and expertly cuts finely detailed shapes into them. For these pieces, Yamanuha treats the photographs as raw material, applying the most amount of detail and intensity as possible.

“The whole collection is centered under the idea of ‘omiyage’ or the Japanese act of bringing small gifts back to friends from abroad. All of the pieces in my collection make reference to that tradition,” said Yamanuha. “I feel that I was able to authentically showcase a slice of Hawaii.”

Yamanuha most recently had his work featured at In4mation in Honolulu. In February and March of next year, Yamanuha will also be showcasing his work in San Francisco at the Museum of Craft and Design. (via booooooom and in4mation)

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