Nest Made from 10,000 Reclaimed Wood Boards By Mark Reigelman

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Artist Mark Reigelman‘s new site-specific installation is aptly titled Reading Nest.  The structure was created just outside the Cleveland Public Library using thousands of reclaimed wood boards.  Reading Nest acts as an alternative setting for learning and growth.  In his statement Reigleman says of the installation’s symbolism:

“For centuries objects in nature have been associated with knowledge and wisdom. Trees of enlightenment and scholarly owls have been particularly prominent in this history of mythological objects of knowledge. The Reading Nest is a visual intermediary between forest and fowl. It symbolizes growth, community and knowledge while continuing to embody mythical roots.”   [via]

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A Gigantic Outdoor Disco Ball By Michel De Broin

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This is a huge disco ball.  The hugest, actually.  Michel De Broin‘s newest site specific installation One Thousand Speculations was created for Toronoto’s Luminato Festival.  The piece consists of disco ball over 25 feet in diameter hoisted 80 feet into the air, spun and spotlit each night of the festival.  The ‘thousand’ of the piece’s title likely refers to the ball’s mirrors – a thousand of which reflect on David Pecaut Square below.  Each of the individual mirrors reflect a large swath of light that travels over the yards and buildings each evening.  The surrounds, perhaps unavoidably, seem to feel just a little more lighthearted.

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Sculptures On Colonialism And Globalization By Yinka Shonibare, MBE

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The work of Yinka Shonibare, MBE is filled with the complexity and ambiguity that make art endlessly exciting.  Born in London, Shonibare moved to Nigeria when he was three years old and later returned to London to attend college.  In a way, his work reflects this personal dynamic between Europe and Africa.  However, Shonibare’s work makes it clear that his scope is much larger than that.  He skillfully blends traditional textiles, costume, and symbolism from various European and African cultures and times.  Through his distinctive work, Shonibare has a way of exploring issues of colonialism in an increasingly shrinking world without taking away any of its complexity.  Thus, his work doesn’t inspire political reactionism, but rather sincere thought and deep consideration.

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Chocolate Nikes, Golden Sewer Grates, And Leather Park Benches By Joost Goudriaan

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Often it seems the most useful objects are the most overlooked.  Much of the work of artist and designer Joost Goudriaan is set upon changing our relationship with such items.    A park bench, an object whose aesthetic is nearly entirely defined by its use, is transformed with traditional craftsmanship.  Goudrian uses leather and walnut wood to turn a typically stark bench into luxuriant public seating.  Also pictured, is a replica of the classic Nike Air Max made from chocolate.  While the original may be prized and collected, Goudriaan compelled anyone who bought his chocolate replica to sign a contract stipulating that they would eat the shoe.

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Mehmet Ali Uysal’s Installations Transform The Commonplace Into The Curious

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The art of Turkish born artist Mehmet Ali Uysal is at once playful and contemplative.  His work often makes use of common objects or images as its starting line.  Uysal then alters its purpose or use in subtle but profound and often humorous ways.  Not only Uysal’s objects, but the surrounding space can feel transformed in a way.  Whether it’s a giant clothespin pinching the earth or slabs of dry wall peeled off the gallery walls, his work seems to reveal the playful potential in mundane places and things.  Visitors are encouraged to revisit spaces that would otherwise be passed over forgotten.

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Installation As Poetic Monument

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Christopher Lavery’s sculptures and installations work as poetic monuments– stretching beyond one particular brand or medium, and focusing, instead, on the art of humanity in relation to our natural state of dreaming.

For instance, Cloudscape (top image above), a collection of representational clouds, stands as tall as 42 feet and hovers alongside Pena Blvd. in Denver, Colorado. Each piece, made of steel, solar panels, polygal, and LED lighting, allows us to reconsider our own relationship with the sky– how a cloud is a talisman or connector: nature’s billboard, ephemerally reminding us to look up and inward.

Big Gold Word Bubble (plan and model, 2nd and 3rd image above), his latest endeavor, after completion, will stand 14’ tall and examine this idea of how, parallel to the clouds, language is both concrete and abstract: a beautifully harmonized collective word bubble and diversely individualized journey of interpretation. To help support its construction and transit to Art in the Park at Elm Park in Worcester, MA, click here. To view more Cloudscape installation shots, scroll down after the jump.

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Claire Healy And Sean Cordeiro’s Recyclable Installations

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Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro - Installation

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Claire Healy and Sean Cordeiro’s large scale installations leave us feeling a bit overwhelmed or claustrophobic, and this is perhaps maybe the point. Their installations use recyclables to not only emphasize the gluttony of spending, but even more so, to confront the looming power of clutter and our strange animalistic aversion and contrasting need for it.

Of their work, the two say, we “live in such an organized society where detritus is not an issue. You put your garbage in a bin, and it goes somewhere. When you start to look at detritus, you automatically think about refuse. Or even more about consumption…getting caught up in the cycle of consume, consume, consume. And how these objects start to quantify your life.”

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Sarah Sze Forages And Deposits A New Installation At Venice Biennale

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Sarah Sze’s installations incorporate everyday items from toothpicks to light bulbs, and “Triple Point,” her most recent endeavor at the Venice Biennale, is no different. Ladders, paper scraps, aluminum rods, sleeping bags, and other finely scavenged items collect and assemble to create a whole new type of machinery: a thinking one that has to do with re-assessing value and investigating the romanticism of objects at play with one another in this never-ending Milky Way of constructs.

According to The New York Times, Sze “wanted the installation to bleed out into the environment.’’ This is relevant to not only the pavilion itself, where the bulk of her work sprawls from room to room and outward onto the exterior landscaping, but also the neighboring community.

Blazing a cryptic trail, before the opening, Sze deposited a series of fake rocks (aluminum structures wrapped in photographs of rocks) sporadically in unexpected places, sometimes, with local businesses, who now house them in unconventional spaces, often along with their own imaginative origin stories. The intention is to lead patrons into the exhibit slowly, almost subconsciously, as though foraging their own trail into the surprising wilderness of Sze’s art.

More images of the installation and a video after the jump.

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