Shadow Street Art Portraits Using Kitchen Strainers

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Strainers are tools not often seen outside of the kitchen, much less in the art studio.  However, artist Isaac Cordal puts them to use in a series of street installations titled Cement Bleak.  For the series Cordal sculpts human faces into the mesh of the hand held strainers.  The strainers are then inserted into the ground.  Sunlight or streetlights pass through the strainers and project a shadow portrait onto the sidewalk.  The nature of strainer’s mesh allows for a strangely realistic face from several angles of light.

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Lunar Cycle Installation Examines The Relationship Between The Moon And The Ocean.

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Pool, The Alchemy of Blue by Australian artist Lizzie Buckmaster Dove poetically celebrates the relationship between the moon and the ocean.  The stone-like pieces found in these images are the remnants of swimming pool found near the ocean in Dove’s hometown of Coledale.  The nearby ocean was slowly destroying the pool with each tide.  The two installations pictured here are a kind of homage to the powerful force of the moon on the ocean below.  She constructed the circles below with her friends to coincide with the lunar cycle.  One arrangement featured the concrete fragment’s blue hued side facing up for the corresponding blue moon.  Dove and her friends organized an empty circle with the concrete at its perimeter for another arrangement to coincide with the new moon.   [via]

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Tom Bendtsen’s Massive Book Sculptures

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Tom Bendtsen’s first book sculptures appeared in 1997. After initially creating basic structures, his work evolved with the idea of using the books’ colors to create a pixelated image effect. Bendtsen even fills the gaps in his structures with objects or scenes that ask the viewer to consider ideas of history, narrative, and creativity. The laterality of the structures and how this mirrors our absorption of contrasts and oppositions inherent in written narrative are also at play. His largest structure is composed of 16,000 books. String is used to create the forms of the sculptures, and then those forms are filled with books.

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Jonah Freeman And Justin Lowe’s Meth Lab And Space Retreat Installations

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Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe’s Black Acid Co-op is a large scale installation of contrasting rooms and objects. The space is accessed through a large hole in the wall in the gallery space, requiring viewers of the work to physically climb through the entrance in order to experience it. While some space is sparse and empty, with evidence of abandonment and decay, others resemble a meth lab, a foreign shop, and a space of retreat. All spaces recontextualize the idea of installation space as a place of continual decay and renewal, calling upon viewers to directly engage with the various spaces. Deitch Projects commissioned this particular piece that was available for viewing in 2009.

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Sun K. Kwak Paints With Tape

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Artist Sun K. Kwak paints with tape.  She had begun her career as a painter but had felt disconnected with the medium.  After experimenting with black masking tape Kwak had found her choice medium.  Speaking of her first experience working with the tape, she says, “It felt like black ink pouring out over my fingers.  It was very fresh, alive, and free.”  The large installation pictured here is found at the Brooklyn Museum and is titled Enfolding 280 Hours – a reference to the amount of time needed to install the work.

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Phoebe Washburn’s Fort Installations And Mixed Media Inventions

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Phoebe Washburn’s constructions, built from found or discarded objects such as plants, plywood, cardboard, or fish tanks, to name a few, have been gaining critical acclaim and momentum since 2008, when she took part in the coveted Whitney Biennial.

Of her craft and salvage, in W Magazine, Washburn states: “I’m not green; I’m greedy . . . There’s definitely an aspect of hoarding that drives this, absolutely! If I see someone walking down the street with a nice piece of wood, I’m like, Where did they get that?”

Her approach to discussing art is as playful and humble as the structures themselves, or their titles, which range from “Nunderwater Nort Lab” (above, top) to “Baby Brain (Not Safe for Use as Jacuzzi)” (above, below).

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Portia Munson’s Scanned Flower Mandalas And Reflecting Pool At P.P.O.W

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Portia Munson’s latest show at P.P.O.W uses photography, installation, and sculpture to create a vibrant and colorful atmosphere that examines nature, including our own.

Entering the gallery, photographic wallpaper of dandelions reach out from under a series of still life prints or memento mori: images of actual flower blossoms, carefully arranged by the artist as a mandala, inside of which, a woodland creature, formerly found along the roadside, nestles.

Of her imaging process, Munson elaborates, “I use the scanner like a large-format camera. I lay flowers directly onto it, allowing pollen and other flower stuff to fall onto the glass and become part of the image. When the high-resolution scans are enlarged, amazing details and natural structures emerge. Every flower mandala is unique to a moment in time, represents what is in bloom on the day I made it.”

When shown alongside Munson’s other piece: Reflecting Pool, a “congested installation” of heaping blue landfill trash, we are forced to confront our natural instincts– to build and discard with quick irreverence.

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Shadow Puppet Installations Made Out Of Doll Parts

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Bohyun Yoon - Installation Bohyun Yoon - InstallationBohyun Yoon has lived in Japan, Korea, and The States. He uses these “diverse social experiences” as a point of reference for his work, which circles around societal restraints and progressive concepts of the body: possible extensions and perils with the advancement of technology/war/culture on a personal and holistic level.

His installation work “Unity” (2009), “Structure of Shadow” (2007), and “Shadow” (2004) casts light on miniature wax body parts which physically dangle aimlessly; however, when illuminated by a light source, these fragmentations create shadows or illusions which illustrate figurative wholeness.

Tethered to our bodies and systems of government, our parts and puppetry, is in essence, our humanness or machinery, or as Yoon explains, what makes us “weak and fragile, spiritless animals under certain rule, certain harsh conditions.” His work also resonates with a sense of devastation felt by veterans returning wounded from battle, physically and spiritually.

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