Wolfgang Stiller’s Human Matchsticks

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Wolfgang Stiller‘s series Matchstickmen are a depiction of people that are literally burnt out.  The sculptures resemble giant match sticks, the the charred match head like a human head, ignited and tossed about the gallery.  A play on the phrase ‘burnt out’, the series comments on the unending demand of human labor.  Interestingly the installation was created while the German artist was living in China.  However, Stiller says of the work:

“I don’t want to see it only as a critique on the Chinese system. Any other system in the world has the same problem. Big companies exploit their employees to make larger profits, all over the world. As long as we have affordable T-shirts or sneakers, we don’t really want to know whether they are made by children in India or not.”  [via]

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Mark Dean Veca: Made For You and Me

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Artist Mark Dean Veca opened his new solo exhibit Made For You and Me at Cristin Tierney  January 31st and is on view through March 9th.  The title of the exhibit is a lyric from the Woodie Guthrie song This Land is Your Land.  The song, originally expressing an anti-capitalist sensibility, has since often been appropriated to convey capitalist sentiments  such as growth through consumption.  Interestingly, Veca’s work often reverses this same process.  He re-appropriates corporate images to comment on corruption, consumption, and a generally waning culture.  Appropriately the gallery statement calls his work a kind of “Sinister Pop”.  This is particularly evident in his piece titled Tailspin.  The piece depicts the Exxon-Mobil Pegasus pointing down, blue on one side, red on the other, and spinning.  Tailspin subtly references a society’s consumption dependent on energy resources that are exceedingly spinning out of control.

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Vik Muniz’ Huge Scrap Metal Animals

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Brazilian artist Vik Muniz created these images of animals using scrap metal.  You can get idea of the huge scale of Muniz’ work by looking at the first image – notice the pile of car doors on the left.  Much of Muniz’ art is an accumulation of what many would consider garbage to create fine art.  He creates huge ‘collages’ from these objects, photographs them, and returns them to their smaller scale.  You may recognize Muniz and his work from the acclaimed documentary Wasteland in which his process was detailed. [via]

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The Cotton Candy Installation of Erno-Erik Raitanen

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Erno-Erik Raitanen‘s site specific installation, Cotton Candy Works, is built to crumble.  For the installation Raitanen builds a wall of cotton candy.  Visitors lick or pull off the cotton candy.  Within hours the entire installation returns back to its original nature – the fluffy sugar reverts back to its crystalline form.  The installation is definitely playful and looks like for gallery visitors.  Its more serious ideas of creation and destruction can’t be ignored.

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Topographical Maps Carved from Electrical Tape and The Thread Sculptures of Takahiro Iwasaki

Check out the artwork of Japanese artist Takahiro Iwasaki. “Not only are his small buildings and electrical towers excruciatingly small and delicate, but they also rest on absurdly mundane objects: rolls of tape, a haphazardly wrinkled towel, or from the bristles of a discarded toothbrush. Only on close inspection do the small details come into focus, faint hints of urbanization sprouting from disorder.” (via). Read More >

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The Surveyor Tape Installations of Megan Geckler

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The slick site specific installations of Megan Geckler beam and bounce of walls like lasers.    Her installations’ ultra clean geometric forms and bright colors nearly hide the personal quality to the work.  The plastic rays are actually made of flagging tape – the kind you find just off the sidewalk typically used by surveyors.  Her installations intentionally bounce between art and design, industrial and hand made, cold and personal.  Also, just as her work shifts conceptually, it also shifts in shape from angle to angle.  Strands at one angle interact with strands at other angles as a viewer moves through the space. [via]

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Rooms Become Massive Balloons in the Installations of Penique Productions

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The Spanish collective Penique Productions creates massive installations that at the same feel nearly weightless.  Using fans and colored plastic the collective entirely covers a selected space in a bright hue.  Though the concept is relatively simple, the space feels totally transformed.  The space and its furnishings are stripped of all their details and reduced to a set of shapes.  Penique’s Productions create an interesting way to investigate familiar places.  Interestingly the collective says regarding the installations:

“It works the relationship between fullness and emptiness, creating a dialogue with the space it temporarily inhabits.”

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Eske Rex’s Drawing Machine

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Its difficult to say whether the drawings or the machine is the work of art here.  Artist Eske Rex created the Drawing Machine which in turn produces ink drawings.  Two pendulums are attached to an arm which is equipped with a ball point pen.  Once the pendulums are set in motion the arms record the contraption’s movement by creating a singular work of art.  Beyond each piece’s pleasing aesthetic is something just as intriguing.  In a way, each drawing documents a very specific movement and time.

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