A Human Ant-Farm by Snarkitecture

The architecture and Art team Snarkitecture have been in the art news lately for their installation at the entrance of the Design Miami Pavilion 2012.  Dig is an earlier installation from the team featured here.  Often  mixing elements of architecture  design, art, and performance, Dig was at once an installation and a performance.

The team filled the Storefront for Art and Architecture with solid architectural foam.  The artists then excavated a network of tunnels through the foam and inhabited them for the following month.  The performance was an artful investigation of contemporary architecture based on excavating rather than building, as well as building for necessity.

David Meyer’s Installations made of Sifted Flour

Artist David Meyer‘s installations could blow away at any moment.  He forms these installations of letters and figures from sifted flour.  Concentric circles of words spelled in capital script letters surround a gallery pillar.  The seeming permanence of the letters disappears as a viewer crouches – each letter clearly becomes only a small pile of flour.  In a way, Meyer uses the  installation to illustrate the nebulous nature of language and images.  While words may at times seem heavy and express real ideas, they begin as hazy thoughts like mounds of flour waiting for a breeze.  Much of David Meyer’s work explores similar ideas.  His installations conjure thoughts of permanence, memory, and information.

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Improvisational Sculptures Made With Donated Materials

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Improvised Making is and was an interactive installation by artist Dominic Wilcox.  Created for the Making Together exhibit in Milan, Wilcox began the installation/sculpture with a single chair.  He invited the public to donate sticks for the project and sticks of all sorts were brought to the gallery.  Over the course of six days, Wilcox taped all of the sticks as they were brought to him to the chair.  Carefully balancing and taping each piece to the structure, he only allowed the four legs of the chair to touch the ground and support the structure.  Prior to moving the completed sculpture into another gallery, the structure’s shadow was documented in red on the wall and floor.

The Laser-Like Thread Installations of Sebastien Preschoux

These photographs depict the carefully constructed installations of artist Sebastien Preschoux.  Preschoux installs his work on location – both in urban and forested settings.  He constructs intricate structures of thread that beam from and through the surroundings.  Through careful lighting, the pieces resemble lasers scanning the area, or giant spider webs strung across branches.  The mathemetical precision of Preschoux’s work contrasts with the unpredictable natural settings they fill.

HelloMe’s Critical Objects Blur The Line Between Art And Furniture

Critical Objects is a personal initiative of Berlin-based graphic design firm, HelloMe. The project began as a series of explorations that thrive on not having any particular goal. The project consists of a series of objects that transcend a blurry line between artistic sculpture and functional furniture. The beauty of the project is that it remains unknown to the user if these things should really every be used, touched, sat on, or turned on… We have a small collection featured here, so be sure to check out the full series at Critical Objects.

Daniel Palacios’ Visualized Sound Waves

Artist Daniel Palacios‘ sculpture nearly seems alive.  A length of rope is attached at to a machine at each end and spun.  The spinning rope creates waves against a black backdrop, which are also audible as the rope cuts through the air.  Visitors entering the gallery and their movement then influence the rope’s wave.  The more a visitor moves in front of the installation, the more chaotic the wave pattern.  It’s interesting to note a visitors surprise or sudden discomfort upon realizing their influence on the wave.  The sculpture not only reveals a viewers impact on sonic surroundings, but also concretely presents also seems to eerily acknowledge each viewers existence in space and movement.

Clinton De Menezes’ Mini-migration Installations

People are on the move in the installations of Clinton De Menezes.  Large crowds of people seem to be trudging through a white field – a snowy plain or salt flat.  The exodus, though, plays out on the side of a wall.  The South African artist’s model migrations exhibit patience and attention to detail.  Each figure is hand painted before being placed and plastered to the wall.  De Menezes’ installations illustrate the personal and collective drama of human migration.  His work is clearly influence by the ever shifting and complex social landscape of the land of his birth.

Michel Blazy’s Massive Installations Made Out Of Detergent Foam

The installations of Michel Blazy grow, flow, and froth.  Like much of his work, Blazy’s latest installation, titled Bouquet Final, makes use of white foam.  Inside a French Medieval church, the foam tumbles from high scaffolding to the floor.  The pliable, moving, and ever changing foam contrasts with the sense of permanence in the centuries old cathedral.  Blazy alludes to a change and mortality by using materials such as foam, an unstable medium in perpetual transformation.  The foamy flow could also reference the earth and neglect for its environment.  The installation resembles uncontrollable detergent suds – a product that is at once used to clean our homes and also a poisonous pollutant to the earth and its waters.