Interview: Jered Sprecher Always Lies

sprecher_nail_to_hang_your_sail_12_24x24

sprecher_slow_burn_12_16x20sprecher_held_close_12_40x44

Jered Sprecher makes paintings that do not fit neatly into any category.  At first they look like geometric abstraction, but then you realize that there is something different about the surface, it’s brushy and the edges of the shapes aren’t dogmatically hard like other geometric paintings.  In his broader body of work there are images peppered in among the abstract elements, but the images are sort of soft pictures with interruptions, like paintings based on a faded calendar that was exposed to too much light in a hallway.  Sprecher’s paintings seem to accept the modern idea that paintings are things, that paintings are first and foremost flat sculpture.  This train of thinking says illusions are a kind of deception, which they are.  Modernism goes a little further by hinting that illusions are lies that are also moral defects.  This aversion to illusion brought us abstract artists like the evangelical Donald Judd, the graceful openness of Helen Frankenthaler, and the philosophical diagrams of Peter Halley.   Enjoying painting as a window into an illusory world is a “mistake” everyone made until the 1940s, when some smart people came along and told us to be careful about it.  Modernists say any artwork that hides its true nature is a metaphor for misunderstanding life in a bigger way.  Sprecher does not seem to completely buy the modernist talking points, and like a bad political surrogate goes off message on a Sunday talk show, saying “Yes, but…  I always lie!”

You can see Sprecher’s newest work in his show I Always Lie at Jeff Bailey Gallery in Chelsea until March 23rd.  Interview after the jump.

Jered Sprecher

Jered Specher’s layered abstractions.

Advertise here !!!