Drew Mosley Three-Dimensional Forest Critters Come Alive In Layers Of Resin

Drew Mosley - Mixed MediaDrew Mosley - Mixed MediaDrew Mosley - Mixed Media

Drew Mosley - Mixed Media

Canadian artist Drew Mosley paints vivid scenes of anthropomorphic animals on layers and layers of resin. Being an artist and a carpenter, his work contains layers of resin that sit inside custom made wooden frames. Being surrounded by incredible nature in his hometown of Ontario, he draws inspiration from the breathtaking beauty of the wild. The little forest creatures he depicts in his artwork are no doubt animals that he has come across on hikes or in daily life. Drew Mosley’s furry friends look like characters from a storybook, with lots of personality and quirky qualities. Although the critters are wild, they act somewhat like humans by carrying objects such as traveling packs and flags.

Drew Mosley creates in depth atmospheres by painting on individual layers of resin. Each animal almost seems to be popping out of its lush habitat, appearing three-dimensional. Even the feathers of the owl seem to be standing straight up, creating a very real sense of volume and shape. By using this technique, the artist renders extremely realistic textures of fur, feathers, twigs, and leaves. Many of his dioramas include found objects that sit right in the resin, jutting out from the piece. In Mosley’s work titled The Egg Thief, a real quail egg is included in the composition, making the entire piece look all the more realistic. The artist also being a carpenter, he creates sculptures and installations of his wild critters. (via Colossal)

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Surreal Paintings Created With Liquid Resin

surreal paintings

DuneganMixed2  Surreal Paintings

Jessica Dunegan’s surreal paintings and portraits are beautifully complex both in content and technique.  Using a mixture of epoxy resin, acrylic paint, and archival prints, Dunegan creates organic work with physical depth. After squeezing paint into a layer of liquid resin and creating opaque, delineating strands of paint, she repeats this process many times. Much of her paintings mediate between a sense of tense turmoil or unrest and peaceful tranquility. There is something both romantic and disorienting about her subjects and composition, and her formal process speaks eloquently to this particular aesthetic.

“My subjects are more than superficial objects. They may look realistic from afar, but upon further inspection, they are comprised of suspended, chaotic lines. I want to capture each animated form in time and celebrate its imperfections.” (via)

Dunegan currently lives in Boston. You can watch a video of her process here.

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