Laser-Cut Wooden Records

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These aren’t your typical vinyl records.  Actually, they’re not vinyl at all.  Amanda Ghassaei seems to have perfectly situated herself between being a scientist and artist.  This project illustrates that well.  For it Ghassaei uses a laser to burn grooves into a variety of materials such as wood, acrylic, and paper.  The grooves are about two times larger than they would be on a regular record.  However, these DIY records are still entirely playable.  Check out the video after the jump to see her laser-cut records in action.

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Steeped In History: The Costume And Prop Designs Of Petra Storrs

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Londoner Petra Storrs is not just a set, prop, and costume/fashion designer– she’s an artist who collaborates with performers to transcend ideas beyond the ephemeral and into a sturdy cult of fantasy. The “reflective mirror dress” she designed for Paloma Faith, for example, not only sharpens the singer’s playful theatrical identity, but further investigates this concept of “the gaze”. In Dazed and Confused Magazine, Faith elaborates on the intention, “Obviously, as a performer, I am normally the observed, but I wanted to flip that dynamic around and make the audience the focus.” Storrs response, of course, was to whip up a garment that literally does just that.

But it’s not just creative camaraderie that gets Storrs’ juices flowing– she also finds inspiration from everyday objects and history, or everyday objects that hold history such as . . . tea. Camellia & the Rabbit, her latest design endeavor (collected here), involves performance artist Rachel Snider, who uses “tea as a central motif/metaphor” and a narrative “like sea shanties” to interweave “historical facts and stories of tea”– thus, evoking our own personal relationship to this British afternoon tradition.

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The Electronic Installations of Alberto Tadiello

The work of Italian artist Alberto Tadiello peeks into the vagaries of technology, nature, and their relationships.  For example, the first five photos of this post depict the installation EPROM (an acronym for Erasable Programmable Read Only Memory).  The installation mounted on the wall consists of music boxes connected to small electric motors, which are in turn connected to transformers.  While the tinny notes of the music boxes may conjure  memories of childhood at first, the motors and music boxes are soon spinning faster than the mechanisms can withstand.  Eventually the motors wear out reducing the ‘music’ to a hardly noticeable noise.  Of this event, the gallery statement says:

“Once the pawls wear out the noise slowly becomes less noticeable and even indistinguishable. The high-speed movement is associated with a sort of cathartic event, which relieves the music box interface from bearing nostalgic feelings.” [via]

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Illustrations of Pop Culture Figures Dancing by Jesse Lonergan

 

Illustrator and comics artist Jesse Lonergan is drawing a “Dancer a Day”. Every day, he draws an icon from movies, music, cartoons, pop culture, etc. in a “dancing pose”. He posts the quick sketches to his “Dancer a Day” blog. Just a really fun, loose project. Who doesn’t dig the image of a groovy Hannibal Lecter or a b-boy Gonzo? What about a super fab “The Dude”, or Godzilla and the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man cutting a rug on top of a metropolis? Some more selections after the jump and head over to the page itself, where Lonergan’s already amassed a pretty large collection of dancers. (via) Read More >

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John Breiner’s Lush Mixed Media Works

Brooklyn artist John Breiner never seems to pin himself down to one medium. Whether he’s using watercolor or ink, he always brings a lot of humanity to the table without sacrificing any aesthetic value. Breiner creates work that is really full- both in composition and technique. He’s also pretty heavily involved with music as well. Seems like he’s got too much going on creatively to really be pinned down in any one place. Definitely not something for us to complain about. Read More >

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THE CREEPY AND FUNKY ILLUSTRATIONS OF Robert Beatty

Kentucky-based Robert Beatty broke out with his cover design, and interior contributions, for the 8th installment of the esteemed Kramers Ergot comics anthology. And this foray was furthered with his recent sequential contribution to Space Face Book’s Rat Hex. His work is surreal. It’s funky. It’s creepy, and strangely erotic at times. It is often rendered with a soft fuzz and a hard edge, which is present in his most distinct work. It fits perfectly into the fields of poster and album design, and looks like a strange relative of the classic Fillmore posters. He also makes music, twittles, and flicks. Watch out.

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Design Month: Speak-er


Unless you’re a millionaire finding good looking speakers that blend in with your decor can be a challenge. Luckily, we have Speak-er speakers! According to guys over at engadget the sound is actually good too, though it’s missing a subwoofer and rich bass. For $100/ pair they seem like a deal.
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Black Light Posters

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There are some things that are just too awesome to be forgotten…. in a sea of trends that the design world is often forced to weather. Take for instance, the 1960′s revolutionary trend of poster printing called The Black Light poster. You’ve got to love the free form type, the over-the-top color, the hand-drawn graphics. How could we ever say this art is dated? This was Plus, these posters have the dual ability to look great in daylight, and look even better under the glow of a black light in a dark room, (that may or may not smell like marijuana). Everybody loves stuff that glows in the dark, even if they’re not high – though I suppose they’d be even more mind blowing when viewed through the colorful lens of LSD.

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