Eiko Ojala’s Cut-Paper Illustration

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Estonian artist Eiko Ojala expertly creates illustrations using paper.  His complex collage pieces are at the same time simple in execution.  His background as an illustrator is clear in each of these pieces.  Ojala is able to communicate a considerable story with minimal imagery and medium.  Whether a series of trees interacting through different seasons, or portraits, Ojala weaves interesting narratives using simple poignant scenes.

The Cut Paper City Sculptures of Matthew Picton

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The work of Matthew Picton is something more than a map, even something more than a model city.  He meticulously builds cities from paper.  Each buildings wall is built from a strip of paper leaving its interior empty.  In a way his three dimensional maps get at the personality of a city.  Speaking about cartography Picton says,

“There is some intrinsic quality to cartography that goes beyond the scientific document – a beauty of form and detail, a record of past times and places, something that lives as a world in which imagination can flow; places to re-visit, places to re-imagine, a world to re-make itself in the imagination.”     [via]

Several of his pieces depict cities before and after a natural disaster or war.  The charred strips of paper mark burnt or crumbled buildings.  Pockets of burnt paper seem more like injuries than a cold record of a past fact.

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Yuken Teruya’s Intricate Cut-Out Trees

 

Yuken Teruya skillfully cuts intricate trees and other shapes out of banal, everyday objects like dollar bills, toilet paper rolls, and cereal boxes. The artist completely transforms what usually amounts to trash into delicate, beautiful art. Really makes you reconsider which material objects are “special”. Even the things we constantly overlook are full of creative (and even spiritual) potential. Teruya has a new piece in a recently opened group show at Denver’s David B. Smith Gallery. (via)

Origami Street Installation from Mademoiselle Maurice

Based in Paris, Mademoiselle Maurice creates colorful installations on the street by conglomerating a bunch of origami. A lot of “street artists” love to talk about how important the ephemeral nature of their work is. Well Mlle. Maurice’s delicate origami doesn’t look like it will last long in its original state. But somehow these works seem really natural in their setting, like a growth of delicate lichen on the shadowed side of a rock. It’s almost as if they appeared on their own. Be sure to check out her website for many more images and projects. (via)

Yunwoo Choi’s Large Sculptures Made of Rolled Magazines

Yunwoo Choi, who holds two M.F.A.’s (one in Sculpture, one in Fine Art), creates large scale sculpture out of rolled up magazines. But that sounds so much more boring than what the artist’s work actually brings to the table. The magazines lend a chunky, geometric punch to the already weighted works that is hard to anticipate only from a textual description. So many magazines are used in each piece that the works almost buzz with a busy violence, which is weird when you consider that they only consist of a a bunch of newsprint. This contradiction calls into question conventional concepts of strength, weight, and coherence.  (via)

Casey Ruble is in the details

 

Casey Ruble‘s cut-out paper collages are “more or less” true, according to the artist. Inspired by Truman Capote‘s “nonfiction novel” genre, Ruble bases her work on real imagery: photographs, books, magazines. She selectively omits, adds, and mixes facts and fiction, constructing scenes best read by their details.

Ryuta Iida’s Paper Cut-Outs

 

 

Ryuta Iida is a Japanese artist who cuts out thick volumes of paper [i.e. magazines and books] to form sculptural objects. I had only seen this done once before by the artist Tim Hawkinson at his solo LACMA exhibit in 2005 and it has boggled me ever since. So, I was thrilled to find out about Ryuta, who is picking up where Hawkinson left off and doing it in their own way. Whereas instead of taking personal photos of themselves to cut into, Ryuta uses popular magazines, thus adding an element of pop culture to their practice. (via)

Debra Scacco unlocks the 3 keys of greatness at MARINE CONTEMPORARY

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 I felt like I was peering into Debra Scacco’s personal journals as I walked around her exhibit BIRDS OF PASSAGE at Marine Contemporary. Her large and small works on paper feature her solid penmanship, which she glides across the surface into geographical formations like States and Countries. ”I Cannot Reach You” and “Hold Me” are just a couple of the repeated lines running throughout their corresponding paintings and although this may sound strange, there is almost a psychic connection between the viewer and the work that gives off the feeling of the syntax without actually having to read it. So, even if Debra wrote them in Itallian and I don’t speak or read Itallian, I would still be able to grasp the emotion trying to reach out for me. These are elegant and beautiful works that can take months and months to complete, especially the installation in the center of the room where she had to glue over 1000 golden pins together to form what looks like a map of all the pieces in the show combined onto one plane.