Documentary Features Retired Chemistry Teacher’s Incredible Geometric Ceramics

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PORCELAINIA from Dave Altizer on Vimeo.

Filmmaker Dave Altizer’s short mini-documentary Porcelainia features Bobby Jaber, an educator, scientist, and artist. After Jaber retired from teaching chemistry, he was able to focus his energies on porcelain work, specifically geometric designs based on molecular shapes. Jaber’s approach to his work is inspired by his scientist/artist predecessors, most notably Buckminster Fuller, inventor of the geodesic dome. Though he’s had a little financial success with some of his work, Jaber is clearly motivated by love and dedication to his craft. Be sure to stick around after the credits to catch Jaber’s priceless reaction to current technology.

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Jonathan Latiano’s Scientifically Inspired Installations

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As a child, Jonathan Latiano found his artistic inspiration in the displays and dioramas at the Philadelphia Academy of Natural Sciences. Latiano uses his understanding of biology, astronomy, physics and geology as starting points for the creation of his work and the way he contextualizes his physical world. Created with a variety of materials, his work evokes tensions of temporality and permanence, physicality and ephemerality, destruction and creation, stasis and kinesis, and fragility and strength. “I find the poeticism and concepts of the physics of our universe simultaneously fascinating, beautiful and horrifying. The pieces that I create contrast abstracted human intuition with the reality of our natural environment. I strive to emphasize the areas that exist in-between the boundaries of defined regions. My work, in many ways, is my own personal attempt to understand my place in the physical universe.”

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Patterns Of Sound Visualized In Sand

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YouTube user brusspup blends science, illusion, and art into double-take inducing videos. Sand is used to create amazing patterns that are called Chladni figures.  Brusspup pours sand on a metal plate that is connected to a speaker and tone generator.  Various frequencies create different patterns of sand on the plate, higher frequencies creating more complex figures.  Different portions of the plate do not vibrate with each frequency.  The sand naturally accumulates in these areas of no frequency, creating a visualization of the sound traveling the metal plate.   [via]

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Roger Hiorns Uses Chemical Transformations To Create Art

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Roger Hiorns‘ sculptures and installations are concerned with chemical processes and how these processes affect his materials and forms. I first encountered Hiorns’ work a few years ago when his installation, Seizure, was nominated for a Turner prize in 2009. For this installation, Hiorns filled an entire vacant & demolition-ready ex-London council estate flat with a copper sulphate solution. This created an abundance of bright blue crystals that filled every inch of the space. Visitors to the space had no choice but to crush some of the crystals as they walked through the transformed flat, further altering the construction of the space and his work.  Hiorns uses the same copper sulphate solution to transform other objects, but also combines other seemingly disparate materials like ceramic pots with moving foam, metal with fire, steel with perfume, and even glass fiber with brain matter. A crucial component of Hiorns’ work stems from his compulsion to initiate the reaction, but then step back and become an objective viewer of his work as it transforms. Hiorns: “The works are successful if they are self-contained and need nothing else. They exist by their own language.”

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Sculptural Portraits Made From The DNA Left On Your Trash

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Artist Heather Dewey-Hagborg‘s project, Stranger Visions, is a wonderful mix of science and art.  Dewey-Hagborg turns a poetic attention to the seemingly innocuous artifacts of life: a hair, chewed gum, a cigarette butt.  Beyond sight, though, the DNA remains of each unique person inhabits these “artifacts”.  She picks up these remains up throughout Brooklyn and brings them to a nearby biology lab.  Dewey-Hagborg extracts the DNA from the object, then information from the DNA.  She runs the information through a program she has written herself that is able to determine physical features such as eye color, hair color, gender, nose width, and so on.  That information is then exported to a 3D color printer to create a sculptural portrait of the unwitting donor.  [via]

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Katie Scott’s Science Inspired Drawings

Katie Scott is an illustrator and printmaker from England. Her works are equal parts 19th century science illustration and tarot card mysticism. Once you look at them long enough, all plants, and living organisms in general, start looking like inspired sculptures. Check out everything on her website, then go to the park and look at the plants!

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Caleb Charland’s Bacteria Growth

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Beautiful photographs by Caleb Charland documenting the growth bacteria on film.

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Lucy McRae

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Lucy McRae straddles the world of fashion, technology and the body. Classically trained as a ballerina and architect, her work inherently is fascinated by the human body and how behaviour constantly shapes the ways in which our body interacts with the world and vice versa.

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