Extremely Detailed Steampunk-Inspired Bronze Sculptures By Alain Bellino

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Talented French sculptor and restorer Alain Bellino creates extremely detailed, ornate bronze sculptures from metal leftovers. He transforms various old items such as cutlery or chandeliers by welding them into fascinating works of art.

Born in 1955, Bellino has been learning gold and silver plating and bronze restoration in his father’s workshop. Only in 2010, after years of practice and technical research, artist developed his personal style which was highly inspired by both Renaissance and steampunk. As described in his website:

“In his work of re-directing and re-assembling, which is both iconoclast and highly rigorous from a formal point of view, at the crossroads between past and future, Alain Bellino sublimates and rehabilitates the ornamentation.”

Various steampunk motifs and floral ornamented skulls are frequent objects in his work. Bellino’s vanitas are often infused with extra surrealism, for example castles and ships and mounting on top of skull sculptures. His latest work, the Darth Vader mask, demonstrates how delicately Bellino’s creations connect modern and antique worlds.

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Johnson Tsang’s Surreal Sculptures Of Frightening Babies

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Honk Kong-based artist Johnson Tsang creates alternative ceramic creations that spook viewers. Employing a realist yet surreal sculptural technique, Tsang looks to produce exaggerated, almost cartoonish, bizarre human forms that look very convincing (and very disturbing). Besides his famous creepy, chubby, porcelain babies–whom he calls his own ‘children’–Tsang is known for his ability to morph both functional objects and the human body to put forth an alternative line of work that challenges the craft oriented world of ceramics. Much like Beccy Ridsdel Dissected Ceramics, Tsang has the ability to make ceramic pieces that in a way remain functional, but still work as a conceptual piece of art.

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Joseph Marr’s Life-Size Sensual Sugar Sculptures

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Australian artist Joseph Marr creates remarkable human-sized sculptures that are made out of sugar. The translucent candy-like texture gives the naked bodies a sensual feel and its color and whimsical appeal.  Marr colors the sculptures with ingredients like cola and raspberry fruit; don’t try eating them, though—most are protected by a layer of polyurethane.

Marr uses the delicious medium in order to convey that sexually charged aura that accompanies the stripped down sculptures. According to TreadHunter, the juxtaposition between the sugary syrup and the naked bodies represents the way that sexual relationships can be sweet and satisfying, but also the way in which people get themselves into sticky situations over lust and desire.

Sex sells and so does candy- the combination of both is bound to create extra appeal to the already wonderful creations.

Joseph Marr was born in 1979 in Australia and now lives and works in Berlin.(via Tread Hunter)

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Nick van Woert Covers Neoclassical Statues In Strange Chemicals

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Combining fiberglass statues with polyurethane, artist Nick van Woert‘s sculptures are swallowed up and overcome by texture and color. Artificial Neo-Classical statues are covered in multi-colored resin in a way that looks like they’ve been caught in the middle of a downpour. The visual weight of the translucent material (and emphasis on it) is something that’s at the center of van Woert’s work. In an article about him on Sight Unseen, the following is said about his philosophy of making:

Figuratively speaking, the idea is that the world we’ve built for ourselves is only as good as the materials we’ve used to build it — these days, that means all manner of plastics, strange chemicals, and the hollow plaster that replaces stone in the replica statues van Woert repurposes.

In the same article, van Woert’s practice is said to be driven by the mantra “you are what you eat.” Essentially, it’s the idea that we’d replace marble statues of Ancient Greek and Roman figures with cheap fiberglass will eventually catch up with us. The things we make now might not hold up the test of time as marble sculptures have. In his work, van Woert attempts to reconcile what it means to uphold the past visually, but not in terms of raw materials.

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Jessica Harrison’s Disturbing Skin Sculptures

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These disturbing sculptures, created by Jessica Harrison, seem to be made out of real, fleshy skin and hair. For your relief, that is not the case; they are actually made out of the casts of the palms and back of the artist’s hands. The artist chooses to photograph these sculptures against real skin, her hands, to trick her viewers into thinking that the actual sculpture might in fact be an extension of her body. Blurring these boundaries and limits of the body, Harrison provokes questions about perceptions and bodily shapes in relation to the two of the five sense, touch and sight.

Her research considers the relationship between interior and exterior spaces of the body, but looks neither inwards towards a hidden core, nor outwards from the subconscious, instead looking orthogonally across the skin to the movement of the body itself, using the surface of the body as a mode of both looking and thinking.

(Via Ignant)

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Sabine Timm’s Miniature Sculptures

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Sabine Timm - Assembledge

Sabine Timm - Assembledge

Glass bottles, broken ceramic statues, buildings, and an oven are all things you’ll find in Sabine Timm’s work. If this sounds excessive, I assure you it’s not. All of these things are miniature-size and require no heavy lifting. The Dusseldorf-based artist uses found and vintage objects to assemble tiny sculptures and arrange items in an amusing way. The images, captured in photographs, don’t seem like permanent installations. Instead, Timm’s handiwork feels fleeting, like we’re seeing a scene from a play.

Timm often utilizes the same objects among assemblages. This practice weaves a narrative through several images, and we can start to imagine a world where all of these things exist. They are vignettes, depicting a fantastic yet logical place. A pile of small petals nearly cover an entire house. Broken ceramics are given a second chance by simply drawing a new body parts. Timm also solves issues like overcrowding simply by stacking houses on top of each other. Build up instead of out, right?

There is obviously a lot of play at hand in Timm’s work. Her sense of humor is very sweet and goofy; for instance, she adds a face to plastic containers, using a comb as a wild hairstyle. It’s has a broad audience and is amusing in a couple of ways. She’s giving personality to inanimate objects, which is absurd. Additionally, the things she uses to create these faces are ingenious. Timm uses a lot of toys, such as the trees out of a train set. It’s nostalgic for many viewers, but also fun for kids, too.  There is a quiet sophistication to her work. The fine details are refined and innovative, yet the attitude of the images themselves are very accessible. You don’t need a formal art education to enjoy Timm’s work, and it’s able to be appreciated on a number of levels.

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Aaron S. Moran’s Reclaimed Wood Sculptures

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Location is important to Canadian artist  Aaron S. Moran. The wood sculptures he creates are both inspired by, and dependent on pieces of wood that he finds in a particular area. From them, he assembles the discarded material into works of art. Using a variety of colors, textures, and patterns, he creates pieces that create a dialogue between place, media, and the viewer.

At times, his sculptures feel like they are going to combust. In his series If You Resist This! and Wash Up (Boundary Bay), wood is unevenly matched in color and size. Pieces are wedged, layered, and placed where they will fit. The non-matching feels almost haphazard, like the piece’s shelf life wasn’t supposed to be very long. This visual tension feels volatile, as if there is something is ticking inside them and about to burst.

At other times, Moran’s sculptures are more docile. They hold an entirely different air and attitude. Here, he uses wood that’s been painted colors of a pretty sunset. Moran has considered placement of colors and arranged the wood in patterns. He titled the series Kite Contest/1991, conjuring up the feelings you’d get from a warm, pleasant day. He writes this about the series, poetically stating, “Sun filtered nostalgia, memories of vibrant kites flying high in the sky along the shore of a beach. Lively patterns from days gone by, blurred by time. Sun bleached photographs of smiling faces. Picnic blankets and pinwheels moving in the warm breeze.”

Moran is currently pursuing his MFA with the University of Windsor in Windsor, Ontario, Canada. He lives along the Detroit River on the border of Canada and the United States. You can follow his works in progress and inspiration on his Tumblr, Year On A River.

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Jessica Harrison’s Pride & Prejudice And Zombies

British artist Jessica Harrison will blow you away with her zombified sculptures of death!  Very “Pride and Prejudice and Zombies.” Love her sculptures!

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