Proof That Siberia Is More Than Just Snow

Vladivostok, 2009

Vladivostok, 2009

Holiday, Vissarion sect, City of the Sun, Krasnoyarsk Territory, 2006

Holiday, Vissarion sect, City of the Sun, Krasnoyarsk Territory, 2006

Koryak foothills, Kamchatka, 2000

Koryak foothills, Kamchatka, 2000

Newlyweds, suburbs of Novosibirsk, November 2010

Newlyweds, suburbs of Novosibirsk, November 2010

A new photography exhibition at the American University Museum wants to show you that Siberia is more than just a cold, barren place. Titled Siberia in the Eyes of Russian Photographers, it paints the Russian region in a different light. Photographs boast impressive landscapes and even some warm weather; We see children swimming and people wearing short-sleeved shirts. Anton Fedyashin, the executive director of the Initiative for Russian Culture at American University, spoke with Slate about stereotypes of Siberia. “Notions of Siberia in the United States come from Hollywood,” he said. “They come from films that emphasize the morbid exoticism of Siberia, the endless white plains, the sparse villages. Those are the kinds of images that are most widespread in the West. Of course, Siberia during winter does look like that, but there’s another side of the story.”

Siberia makes up about 75 perfect of Russia’s landmass, but only 25 percent of its population. The people who live there are described as having an independent spirit, much like pioneers who settled in the American West during the 19th century. The exhibition draws comparisons between the two places. “It’s an image that overemphasizes the negative aspects of this enormous part of the Eurasian continent and one that completely underrepresents the enormous geographical variety, which is breathtakingly beautiful. The exhibit shows that it’s equally as beautiful and eerily similar to the American West.” Fedyashin explains. While many Western photographers chose to accentuate the emptiness of Siberia, the Russian photographers in this exhibition depict a multifaceted place, spanning from the 1860′s to 2011.  (Via Slate)

Currently Trending

Advertise here !!!