Robot ethics becoming a concern with corpse-feeding droids on the battlefield

EATR
I heard this discussion over the ethics of killer robots (ENERGETICALLY AUTONOMOUS TACTICAL ROBOT, appropriately shortened to “EATR”) on the battlefield on KPCC radio bright ‘n’ early this morning and became excited over the possibility of science fiction plot lines inching closer and closer to reality. This picture above will not be what they look like (a more accurate modeled depiction after the jump), but how frightening would it be if these self-refueling lovelies really did jump into the uncanny valley? The government is trying to make more “ethically” aware EAT(E)Rs that will reject tasty corpse morsels on the battlefield (this is apparently against the Geneva convention?) for more Brontosaurus-friendly scraps. The question comes then, if your robot kills someone on the battlefield, who’s moral dilemma does it become? Obviously robots are not of a sentient mind to make such decisions…or are they?

Hussein Chalayan

Hussein Chalayan

British/Turkish fashion designer Hussein Chalayan is not only an internationally known figure in the industry’s runway, he is also an artist and catalyst for change of what it means to wear something. With his progressive attitude to clothing as a decorate-able and manipulatable second layer of skin, Hussein Chalayan has expanded the the materials of construction to an awe-inspiring breadth of technology and innovation.

Advertise here !!!

Lucy McRae

Lucy McRae
Lucy McRae straddles the world of fashion, technology and the body. Classically trained as a ballerina and architect, her work inherently is fascinated by the human body and how behaviour constantly shapes the ways in which our body interacts with the world and vice versa.

Tiffany Sum

"Lake Intervention", 2007/2008. Sound installation/ 30" x 24" Digital C-Print. Collaboration with Samuel Ekwurtzel.  

 

 

"Lake Intervention", 2007/2008. Sound installation/ 30" x 24" Digital C-Print. Collaboration with Samuel Ekwurtzel.

 

Tiffany Sum’s work explores the im/possibility of intimacy between body and technology. Through interactivity in participatory situations, impressions alternate between the visceral and palpable, the fleeting and intangible. The responsive environment generates a constantly changing social formation among the audience. The process of internalizing these impressions into personally meaningful enactments can be voluntary — as in the gallery, or involuntary — as in the public place.

 

Michael Schouflikir

French artist Michael Schouflikir’s work revolves the daily struggles we have with technology & modern human condition. Basically, the condition of our machines and nature that becomes more and more machine-like. We’re beat out and attacked by overgrown plants, take escalators towards our certain future of decapitation, and develop USB flash drives as bones. But don’t we kind of like it?

 

Chromosomal visualization

DNA Radio (German experts on biotech) converts the entire human genome to images and audio that will be streaming on the internet 24/7. Isn’t it crazy that figuratively, all we are made up of are these dots? Here’s a little science lesson for you…